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Feminist Pedagogy: Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association in Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 1:10pm
Kathleen Alves/CUNY

Feminist Pedagogy in the Two-Year College

How do two-year college instructors put feminist theory into pedagogical practice? This roundtable discusses forms of feminist pedagogy in the community college classroom. Participants are invited to share methods and ideas of pedagogy for teaching in women and gender studies and/or feminist approaches to learning and classroom strategies across the disciplines. Papers should aim to address gender and sexuality issues, along with race and class, within and outside the rapidly transforming academic space of the two-year college.

The Literacy Boom and Contemporary Anglophone Literature, Cambridge, MA, 17-20 March 2016

Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 12:55pm
American Comparative Literature Association

Recent work on world literary systems has done much to illuminate the history, geography, and politics of our present-day literary moment. We now know much about the uneven circulation of narrative forms across the globe; about the ethical and epistemological challenges facing translation; and about the impact that literary markets have had on literary and cultural production.

Seminar: Reading Visual Cultures (ACLA 2016 Seminar March 17-20 2016 at Harvard)

Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 10:40am
Co-Organizers: Margaret Galvan, The Graduate Center, CUNY and Leah Souffrant, New York University

It has been more than fifty years since Susan Sontag insisted: "What is important now is to recover our senses. We must learn to see more, to hear more, to feel more." To what extent has this lesson been learned? And how committed are we to teaching it? And through what methods? This seminar seeks to examine the possibilities and limitations of theoretical approaches that help us understand and assess Gloria Anzaldúa's claim that the "image is a bridge between evoked emotion and conscious knowledge; words are the cables that hold up the bridge. Images are more direct, more immediate than words, and closer to the unconscious. Picture language precedes thinking in words; the metaphorical mind precedes analytical consciousness."

Berkeley Journal of Religion and Theology: General Call for Papers, 2015-2016

Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 4:58pm
Berkeley Journal of Religion and Theology: The Journal of the Graduate Theological Union

The Berkeley Journal of Religion and Theology (BJRT) is a new, peer-reviewed journal of the Graduate Theological Union at Berkeley that is managed by GTU doctoral students under the supervision of the GTU consortial faculty. The mission of the BJRT is to be an international and diverse forum of original, cutting-edge scholarship in religious studies, philosophy, and theology that reflects the GTU's endeavor to be a nexus for "where religion meets the world."

The (Native) American University

Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:16am
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

The colonial appropriation of indigenous place names has been an abiding concern of postcolonial studies. The severing of names from their semantic, grammatical, and linguistic ties within the native language and their re-contextualization within the language of the settler creates, in a variety of ways for both colonizer and colonized, a gap between the experience and meaning of a place and the name used to describe it, complicating the colonial boundary.

Dollars and Desire: Capitalism, Oppression, and the Racial Other

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:46pm
Northeast MLA (NeMLA)

The history of the commodification of Black bodies within a global context has been central to the Afro-diasporic experience. While in conversation with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and colonization; contemporary scholarship grapples with what it is to interrogate the consumption of Black bodies. Working from the perspective of Blackness and commodification in Black Looks: Race and Representation, bell hooks argues that the "contemporary commodification of Black culture by whites in no way challenges white supremacy when it takes the form of making Blackness the 'spice' that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture" (14).