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[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

CFP: Peripheral Modernity and the South Asian Literary-World

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:54pm
24th European Conference on South Asian Studies, University of Warsaw, Poland

The 2008 global downturn has compelled the social sciences and humanities to refocus on the concept of "crisis" in capitalism and rethink the relations between "core" and "periphery." What is crucial to this era of crisis is the emergence of the BRICS countries and the corresponding shifts in the world system. Debates on world literature and comparitivism have been alert to these readjustments (Moretti, 2000; Orsini, 2003; Damrosch, 2005; Warwick RC, 2015) as well as the proliferation of the neo-social realist novel (Adiga, Hamid, etc).

'To (Not So) Boldly Go': Science Fiction as Instrument of Colonial Enterprise (Roundtable) NeMLA 2016

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:20pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) March 17-20, 2016

Both science fiction and postcolonial theory are concerned with troubling normative understandings of movement, diaspora, and hybridity. Indeed, "The Stranger in the Strange Land" is an oppositional trope that is at the heart of both science fiction and historical colonial encounters. The other-worldliness and futurity of science fiction has offered numerous writers an effective (and increasingly popular) medium to critique political, social, and cultural issues, and in many ways presents an ideal literary landscape to interrogate the colonial enterprise. Even so, there is a relative lack of postcolonial voices in the mainstream SF genre. What accounts for this silence?

Conference marking the 40th Anniversary of the television miniseries Roots

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 3:53pm
Goodwin College

In the final week of January, 1977, the ABC miniseries Roots became the most-watched television program of all time. To the surprise of the show's producers, Roots became not only a ratings windfall, but a cultural phenomenon, articulating an African-American counter-narrative of American history, provoking a dialogue about the legacy of slavery, and presenting African-American characters with a dignity and integrity that differed sharply from the caricatured representations common to television up to that time. In many ways, the response to the show by the media and the general public constitutes the first of many "conversations about race" that have punctuated the Post-Civil Rights era.

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:55am
Kate Costello/ University of Oxford

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective
Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting
March 17-20, Harvard University, Cambridge MA

Submission deadline: September 23

Bilingualism is a phenomenon that unites literary creation across geographic and temporal boundaries. Yet questions about the role of bilingual competencies in literature often remain overlooked. This panel seeks to bring together scholars across disciplines in exploring the place of bilingualism in literary production and the comparative potential of bilingualism in literary criticism.

Feminist Singularities [UPDATE]

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:31am
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

Co-organizers: Jacquelyn Ardam, UCLA; Ronjaunee Chatterjee, CalArts

2015 marked the 30-year anniversary of the publication of Donna Haraway's "A Cyborg Manifesto," whose radical questioning of the divisions between human and machine, matter and meaning, and gendered and "postgendered" existence continues to animate our social reality. Recent discussions in the field of new materialism, which grapple with questions of embodiment and materiality, have opened up new avenues for theorizing femininity outside of conventional frameworks.

[UPDATE] ACLA 2016 Seminar: Morphology of the Trauma Text

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:01am
Jay Rajiva, Georgia State University; Jennifer Olive, Georgia State University

Seminar Proposal for ACLA 2016 (American Comparative Literature Association)
March 17-20, 2016
Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

[UPDATE] CFP: Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:43am
Keridiana Chez

Submission for papers begins today through Sept. 23rd.

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

CFP [UPDATE]: Transgender Studies

Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 9:44am
Gender Forum: An Internet Journal for Gender Studies

In May 2014, on a cover featuring actress and transgender activist Laverne Cox, Time Magazine proclaimed that we had reached the "transgender tipping point". But have we? What would it look like if we had? While it is true that transgender activists like Cox and Janet Mock are appearing on our televisions more often, and transgender models like Ines Rau or Andreja Pejic are gracing the pages of magazines, transgender women (especially women of color) are still disproportionately at risk for hate crimes, and face discrimination in many areas of life.