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Border Disputes: Global Modernism and World Literature - MadLit Conference 2/25/16-2/27/16

updated: 
Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 8:48pm
Modernisms/Modernities Colloquium (MMC) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Recently scholars of modernism have advocated for a "global turn". Accordingly, the field of modernist studies has expanded to encompass times and places, authors and texts, which have been overlooked by traditional, canonical accounts of modernism. Extending the spatial and temporal boundaries of modernism has opened new avenues of inquiry and discovery. The decentering of modernist studies from its European focus has led to the inclusion of many non-European traditions and literatures. However, some argue that a global approach to the study of modernism ignores the particularities of history, culture, and language.

2016 Theatre Symposium: Pages, Stages, Audiences

updated: 
Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 6:47am
Qatar University, Doha Department of English Literature and Linguistcs

Full Title: Theatre Symposium 2016: Pages, Stages, Audiences

Date: 08-May-2016 - 09-May-2016
Location: Qatar University Campus, Doha, Qatar
Contact Person: Dr. Anastasia Remoundou-Howley ts2016@qu.edu.qa
Call Deadline: February 28, 2016
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1652348941703221/

The Department of English Literature and Linguistics at Qatar University inaugurates a two-day Theatre Symposium open to scholars and theatre practitioners with an interest in theatre and theatrical praxis in and about the Middle East.

(Un)stable Identities: How the Self is Forged and Found - March 19, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 8:05pm
English Graduate Student Association, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: (Un)Stable Identities: How the Self is Forged and Found

"There will be time / to prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet."­ Eliot, Prufrock
"We know what we are, but now what we may be."­ Shakespeare, Hamlet
"I am not an angel...and I will not be one till I die. I will be myself." ­ Bronte, Jane Eyre

Heresy, Belief, and Ideology: Dissent in Politics and Religion

updated: 
Monday, December 28, 2015 - 7:32pm
Second Conference of the International Society for Heresy Studies

The International Society for Heresy Studies announces a Call for Papers for its second biennial conference at New York University, June 1-3, 2016. The conference theme will broadly focus on ideological aspects of heresy in both religion and politics. Throughout history, definitions of "heresy" have been crucial to defining "orthodox" belief, worship, and practice. Indeed, every faith, ideology, and institution must struggle over what is deemed heretical as part of defining what is deemed normative, and it is hard to imagine any ideology (even an anti-ideology ideology) that does not draw a boundary to mark what is subversive or unacceptable.

The Street and the City - Awakenings: 14-15 April 2016

updated: 
Monday, December 28, 2015 - 9:54am
University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies

The Street and the City - Awakenings
Date: 14-15 April 2016
Convener: University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies / ESHTE
Venue: School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon and
Estoril Higher Institute for Tourism and Hotel Studies

CFPanelists: "Black Narratives of Home/Property in American Literature" [DUE 1.25.16]

updated: 
Sunday, December 27, 2015 - 6:01pm
American Studies Association

Toni Morrison writes in her first novel 'The Bluest Eye' (1970): "Knowing that there was such a thing as outdoors bred in us a hunger for property, for ownership. The firm possession of a yard, a porch, a grape arbor. Propertied black people spent all their energies, all their love, on their nests" (18). This passage brings immediately to mind the thematic preoccupation with property and landholding throughout American literary history—from Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'House of the Seven Gables' to William Faulkner's Sutpen's Hundred, Willa Cather's Blue Mesa to Arthur Miller's Willy Loman—and the place of Black narrative within that tradition.

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