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Heidelberg Center for American Studies 13th Annual Spring Academy Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 8:59am
Heidelberg Center for American Studies

Heidelberg, Germany, 14-18 March, 2016

Call for Papers

The thirteenth HCA Spring Academy on American History, Culture, and Politics will be held from March 14-18, 2016. The Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) invites applications for this annual one-week conference that provides twenty international Ph.D. students with the opportunity to present and discuss their Ph.D. projects.

The HCA Spring Academy will also offer participants the chance to work closely with experts in their respective fields of study. For this purpose, workshops held by visiting scholars will take place during this week.

Comment dit-on queer? Queer Theory in French

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 1:15pm
Adam J. Dexter / NeMLA

47th Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
17 March - 20 March 2016

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Sept. 30, 2015

[CFP SCMS 2016] The Possibility of an Island Film

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 12:07pm
Joseph Pomp / Harvard University

The oft-remarked "spatial turn" in cultural studies (initiated in part by the reception of Michel de Certeau, Henri Lefebvre, and David Harvey) converged with a resurgence of interest in films that rest upon a depiction or evocation of a specific geographical entity: the "street film," the "city symphony" or the Bergfilm, to name a few oft-noted categories. Many scholars seem to agree tacitly that we might also speak about an "island film," although the term itself has yet to be properly articulated and circulated. In fact, the very concept of a discreet "islandology" is a brand new one (see Marc Shell, Stanford U.P. 2014).

[UPDATE] Ruth Rendell: Special Issue of Contemporary Women's Writing on Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 8:11am
Falmouth University

Ruth Rendell, who has recently died, was one of the most prolific and important female authors of the C20th/21st centuries, achieving many literary awards and honours, plus a Labour peerage. Her literary output, both as Ruth Rendell and Barbara Vine, transcended generic boundaries and conventional assumptions about character, the police procedural novel, class and gender, amongst many of her other concerns.

Museum Engagements in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature; NeMLA 2016; Hartford, CT; March 17-20, 2016 [UPDATE]

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 5:11pm
NeMLA 2016

The rise of the modern museum was (and remains) a global event that resonates across literary cultures. Germain Bazin termed the nineteenth century the "Museum Age" for the myriad ways the new phenomenon of the public museum redefined the social status of art. This session investigates how this development was received by nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglophone authors writing during and immediately following the rise of the modern museum.

CFP: CCLA Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively 28-30 May, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:09pm
Canadian Comparative Literature Association

CFP: Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively

Knowledge and understandings of shared values are created based on our respect for difference and diversity and our engagement with the communities we live in. A focus on connections between the individual, the local and the global can provoke new ways of thinking.

Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:54pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

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