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Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences

updated: 
Saturday, March 26, 2016 - 4:45pm
Journal of Humanities and Cultural Studies R&D

The journal's objectives are to publish papers of broad interest in the humanities and social sciences. The journal strives to enable a sound balance between theory and practice and will publish papers of research, conceptual, viewpoint, case study, literature review nature in broad topics in the field such as: Philosophy and Psychology, Religion and Theology, Social Sciences, Language, the Arts, Literature and Rhetoric, Geography and History, Management, Communication, Media and Information Sciences.

Submission via website:
http://jrsdjournal.wix.com/humanities-cultural

or email:

Call for papers Journal of Digital Humanities

updated: 
Saturday, March 26, 2016 - 4:39pm
Journal of Humanities and Cultural Studies R&D

submission via website

jrsdjournal.wix.com/humanities-cultural

or email:

jrsd.journal@gmail.com

The Journal of Digital Humanities is a comprehensive, peer-reviewed, open access journal that features scholarship, tools, and conversations produced, identified, and tracked by members of the digital humanities community through Digital Humanities Now.

SPECTRA Journal submissions open for Issue 5.2

updated: 
Friday, March 25, 2016 - 1:06pm
SPECTRA (the Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Theory Archives) Journal

SPECTRA: The ASPECT Journal http://spectrajournal.org
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Issue 5.2, Spring 2016
Theme: Crisis & Transformation
Initial abstracts due Friday, April 15, 2016 Full submissions due Wednesday, May 4, 2016

[UPDATE] Chapter proposals for "Transecology: Transgender Perspectives on the Environment"

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 4:27pm
Douglas Vakoch / California Institute of Integral Studies

Chapter proposals are invited for the edited book Transecology: Transgender Perspectives on the Environment, due by May 15, 2016. This volume will explore the intersection between transgender studies and ecology, with contributions from an international group of scholars representing a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, including but not limited to such fields as literary criticism, gender studies, environmental studies, history, philosophy, religious studies, women's studies, anthropology, sociology, psychology, economics, geography, and political science.

Austen and Deleuze

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 2:28pm
Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge

2017 is the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death. Austen has become one of the most discussed and beloved literary figures; indeed, her status as one of our most beloved literary figures has often influenced the ways in which her life and works are discussed within critical circles. Eve Sedgwick famously announced that Austen criticism is "notable not just for its timidity and banality but for its unresting exaction of the spectacle of a Girl Being Taught a Lesson." This special issue of Rhizomes invites critical articles and creative works that dismiss both this legacy of timidity and the tendency to exact pedagogical spectacles through scholarship.

Recuperation (of antagonistic, oppositional or emancipatory Forms of Cultural Production)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 1:42pm
London Conference in Critical Thought

Recuperation is an inexorable feature of late capitalism, as modes of art and cultural expression that once were resistant, oppositional or antagonistic from the 1960's and 70's have been gradually absorbed by
capitalism and its attendant apparatus, such that a certain generation has no idea what even constitutes "political dissent" because they have never seen examples of it. Land art which once rejected the

Journal of Intercultural Inquiry

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 11:43am
Geoffrey Nash/University of Sunderland, UK

CFP Journal of Intercultural Inquiry
Call for Papers
Date Submitted:
Announcement ID:

[UPDATE] Borders and Borderlands: Liminal Textualities in Contemporary Literature

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 10:26am
York St John University

Borderlands are defined as being both 'an area of land close to a border between two countries' and 'an area between two qualities, ideas or subjects that has features of both but is not clearly one or the other' (Oxford Dictionaries, 2016). The significance of borders and borderlands has become particularly prevalent in contemporary society. Literature has always responded to the issues of its context of production such as Burke writing on the French Revolution up to and including Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche's 2013 novel Americanah addressing global concerns of nationality and migration.

Afro-Mexico: Negotiating a Cultural Identity through Dance

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 3:47am
Joana A. Guzman

This research looks at the cultural performances and popular celebrations practiced by Afro-Mexicans from the colonial period to the 20th century in the regions of Veracruz, Oaxaca and Guerrero. The goal is to demonstrate how the use of performance and popular traditions has impacted Afro-Mexicans in the shaping of an imagined community, giving space for agency in the formation of their cultural identity. The scholarship of the African diaspora in Mexico is a relatively fresh area of study. Gonzalo Aguirre Beltran (1945) pioneered the documentation of their economic history including slavery and origins. Other themes of study rely on sociopolitical aspects, geographic studies, gender, magic and spirituality.

(Update) Call for Abstracts for Critical Insights: Civil Rights

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 3:22am
Christopher Allen Varlack (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)

From its flawed notion of "separate but equal" to the rampant violence against black bodies throughout the twentieth century, the United States faced a clear racial divide perpetuated by its Jim Crow culture and the disenfranchisement of blacks. In response, on August 28, 1963, noted American civil rights activist, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, urging radical social and political change in a society marred by a rich history of segregation and discrimination. Since then, we have recognized this speech as a symbol of the enduring struggle for equal civil rights and the pursuit of the core values upon which the United States was based.

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