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Dramatising death and dying in British theatre

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 7:15pm
dr Katarzyna Bronk

Medieval drama taught its audiences not only about virtuous living but, more importantly, a good death and a joyful afterlife. Miracle plays re-played the most significant and most spectacular deaths known from the Gospels, while morality plays, such as Everyman, imagined the act of dying and the prospects for posthumous happiness of their main characters.

North American Literature and the Environment. Deadline Oct. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 2:53pm
Jim Daems

I am putting together a proposal for a collection of essays for the North American Literature and the Environment, 1600-1900 series for Ashgate. The book will focus on the 16th and 17th centuries, and particularly on how religious views of the period, be they Puritan or Church of England, for example, play a role in how the environment or the colonial enterprise is represented in the work(s) of an author or authors. I am also thinking of such representation in a way that can consider broader categories beyond just theology—gender, sexuality, race, ecocriticism, etc. Topics could include, but are not limited to:
How does a particular religious worldview influence a writer's representation of the North American environment?

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 10:55am
Postcolonial Studies@ Emory

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

Postcolonial Studies @Emory: https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/postcolonialstudies/
Faculty Developer: Deepika Bahri, Deepika [dot] bahri [at] emory [dot] edu
Book Review Editor: Caroline Schwenz, cschwen [at] emory [dot] edu

Postcolonial Studies @ Emory is a long standing website that aims to create a more inclusive digital community for postcolonial studies scholars across the globe. Our website accepts book review submissions as well as summaries of important postcolonial works for our Digital Bookshelf.

International Conference Fictional Maps

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 3:01pm
Facta Ficta Research Centre & Silesian University in Katowice

Mapping the imaginary has always been a challenge for world-building and storytelling alike. Map of the fictional world subverts the very essence of an actual cartography: it represents a territory that cannot be discovered or traversed in a non-fictional realm and yet it delivers much more than a usual map: a promise of the journey into unknown. An exquisitely quotable phrase coined by J. R. R. Tolkien, who claimed to "start writing with a map and [then] make the story fit" is only reprising what have always been evident to cartographers and creators of imaginary worlds: maps precede territories and are inevitably becoming the most essen¬tial part of modern and postmodern storyworlds.

Australian Narratives in Film and Literature: Critical Perspectives

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 2:58pm
Ilha do Desterro (Brazil)

Ever since the early days of British occupation of Australia, there has been a major concern in finding a balance between the colonial ways of looking to the land and the difficulty, if not impossibility, of dealing with the vastness of the Australian territory and the diversity of its native peoples. Such tensions, far from being resolved, have created a literary and filmic system which reflects the multiplicity of approaches and constructions of Australian land and culture and whose examples, unfortunately, do not reach the non-English-speaking world as they should.

"Realizing the Unreal: Victorian Speculative fiction in Context" - Abstracts due November 15, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:26pm
The Confidential Clerk: Journal of the Centre for Victorian Studies

The Confidential Clerk (ISSN 2454-6100), an open-access, peer-reviewed journal of the Centre for Victorian Studies, Jadavpur University, seeks contributions for its 2015/16 issue, 'Realizing the Unreal: Victorian Speculative Fiction in Context'. The issue will focus on Victorian speculative fiction and its generic, thematic, historical, and cultural contexts. Victorian speculative fiction is usually described as 'a flight from the real'; but we welcome submissions that go beyond this understanding to show how the Victorian imagination engages with the unreality of the real or creates alternative realities of the unreal in different forms of speculative fiction.

[UPDATE] Commonwealth Essays and Studies, Spring 2016 Post-conflict territories: representations and reconfigurations

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 6:57am
CES

Through the creation of a bounded space, territory, as Stuart Elden points out, 'is already a violent act of exclusion and inclusion; maintaining it as such requires constant vigilance and the mobilization of threat, and challenging it necessarily entails a transgression' (Elden, Terror and Terrorism xxx). This organisation and maintaining of territorial limits as an enterprise fraught with violence is clearly apparent in the postcolonial world, the boundaries of which, ever since European imperial expansion began and right through to decolonisation and the present era, have been drawn and redrawn with little or no consideration for the cultural and historical affinities among the inhabitants of those places.

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