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Old age and aging in British theatre and drama - An edited collection

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 10:43am
dr Katarzyna Bronk

In contrast to the ongoing childhood studies, humanistic gerontology is still largely an unexplored research area, despite more and more attention being paid to old age by historians, sociologists and literary scholars. The latter have taken up the subject of aging and the elderly, trying to create something like an all-encompassing literary "meta-narrative old age" (Johnson and Thane, eds., Old age from antiquity to post-modernity, 17). Johnson and Thane suggest that this may be a fallacy and that one should rather focus on more contained historical and socio-cultural research areas when studying the processes and meaning of aging. This way, for instance, one can avoid interpretative mistakes attributed to Georges Minois.

The Fiction of Law. About Crime, Justice, facts and imagination (abstract delivery: 10th September 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 10:24am
Altre Modernità, Università degli Studi di Milano (Italia)

In a traditional perspective, we define crime fiction as a popular genre regulated by a clearly identifiable set of formal and thematic rules – or "formulae" (Scaggs 2005) – and aligned, with minimal departures, to the paradigm proposed by W.H. Auden in 1948: "a murder occurs; many are suspected; all but one suspect, who is the murderer, are eliminated; the murderer is arrested or dies." (The Guilty Vicarage). In its natural evolution process, the genre has emancipated itself from this formulaic structure and from the thematic limitations to become a privileged site for stylistic experimentation (including documentary fiction, both literary & filmic) and for the voicing of social concerns and political reflections.

[UPDATE] Privacy and Freedom in the Digital Age (Journal Special Issue August 30, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 9:44am
PROTEUS--A Journal of Ideas

Proteus: A Journal of Ideas seeks submissions for our upcoming issue, "Privacy and Freedom in the Digital Age." We are soliciting articles and creative works from a wide range of disciplines that reflect upon the issue's theme. We are looking for broad theoretical inquiries, individual case studies, and traditional scholarly articles related to the theme. Additionally, we strongly encourage submissions of theme-related photographs, poetry, and creative writing. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Novel Theory Across the Disciplines, Graduate Student Symposium, December 8, 2015

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 10:53pm
Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University

From its earliest forms to its contemporary iterations, the novel remains a radically capacious and evolving genre. As the dominant form of modern literature, the novel assumes various overlapping functions as an aesthetic object, cultural artifact, historical text, and conceptual resource. At the same time, novelistic conventions such as plot structure, narrative technique, and characterization shape and inform scholarly research across an array of disciplines including anthropology, film and television studies, law, and medicine.

Lacan and Philosophy (ACLA 2016, March 17 -20, Harvard University)

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 8:34pm
Todd McGowan (University of Vermont)/Gautam Basu Thakur (Boise State U)

2015 marks the 40th anniversary of a controversial talk that Jacques Lacan gave at MIT. Lacan's audience came expecting a discussion of psychoanalytic theory and practice, but what they heard didn't fit within the confines of psychoanalysis. This produced much disappointment among audience members. On this anniversary, we propose to return to the question of where Lacan's thought belongs. Specifically, we want to consider Lacan as a philosopher and in relation to other philosophers. Though Lacan himself constantly emphasized his distance from philosophers like Kant, Hegel, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty, recent thinkers inspired by Lacan have seen himself, despite his stated intentions, as Kantian, Hegelian, or Sartrean.

Call for Book Chapters. Mater Dolorosa: The Representation of the Blessed Mary in Literature and Art

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 6:52pm
Universitas Press

In today's complex world religious discourse is especially crucial, considering that secularism is expanding around the globe. We seek contributions on the representation of the Virgin Mary in World Literature and Art. Comparative approaches are always welcome. Religious and cultural literacy is important for domestic and international politics, the practice of peace, harmony, justice, and social prosperity. Thus, this edited volume will help diminish religious illiteracy. Universitas Press has agreed to publish this edited volume. Contributions are welcome from scholars in various disciplines in the humanities.

Analyses/Rereadings/Theories Journal - issue 5 call for articles

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 3:08pm
University of Lodz

Analyses/Rereadings/Theories (A/R/T Journal) is a peer-reviewed journal that has been created with a view to providing a forum for analyzing and discussing issues of immediate relevance for contemporary literary and cultural studies.

The editors would like to invite submission of contributions for its fifth issue, to be published in December 2015. We invite original articles, reviews and interviews addressing any topics related to Anglophone literature and culture.

The contributions should be between 4000 and 6000 words long. Each contribution will be anonymously refereed by a reviewer (double-blind review). The deadline for the submission of manuscripts is 30 September 2015.

Seriously Funny: The Role of Satire and the Satirist in the 21st Century -- NeMLA 2016 (March 17-20, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 9:33am
Danielle Fuentes Morgan/ NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)

Dave Chappelle walked away from a $50 million contract with Comedy Central, later explaining, "I want to make sure that I am dancing and not shuffling." Likewise, Stephen Colbert refused to allow his young children to watch his Colbert Report, in an effort to prevent their confusing his persona with their dad. This panel seeks proposals examining the role and responsibility of the satirist in the 21st century. How do satirists distinguish themselves (or not) from their satire and how does this impact audience understanding?

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