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Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:54pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

Tracing Indo-American Encounters, 1780s-1880s (for ACLA 2016)

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 8:38am
Anupama Arora, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth; Rajender Kaur, William Paterson University

This seminar seeks to draw on the growing body of work oriented toward the transnational and global turn in American Studies to trace connections between the Indian subcontinent and the United States in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We invite papers that examine the traffic (of ideas, texts, people, commodities) between India and the U.S. to provide a window into the ways in which India was part of the cultural landscape and imaginary of the U.S. from its inception, and performed important ideological work in domestic conversations such as those surrounding race, nation, religion, gender, and trade.

The Evidence of Realism (deadline 9/23/15; ACLA, Harvard 3/17-20/16)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:39pm
Geoffrey Baker

The Evidence of Realism

[For the annual meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association at Harvard University, March 17-20 2016]

How do texts--and especially realist texts--and their plots use or complicate the idea of evidence? What sort of evidence do such texts seem to assume readers require in order to encounter the "effect of the real"? And how do contemporaneous ideas of evidence from philosophy, legal theory, or science provide context for the consideration of evidence in literary works?

Animals, Animality, and National Identity (ACLA 3/17-3/20/2016; due 9/23/15)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:22pm
Keridiana Chez

This seminar will explore how national identities have been forged through the manipulation and deployment of animals and animality. How have animals, and ideas associated with such animals, been used to construct imagined communities? How have these constructions helped to strengthen or weaken national borders? How have assertions of imagined community, as expressed via relations with animals, overlapped with racial/ethnic identities?

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

Trans/forming the Digital Humanities: Disciplinary Borders, Digital Frontiers

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 1:29pm
NeMLA 2016 - Hartford, Connecticut

Literary studies finds itself today at a double crossroads: as trans-formative digital humanities practice becomes increasingly accepted and visible in our research and curricula, so, even in more traditional methods of inquiry, has the unit of the "trans-" gained traction. Transnational, transatlantic, trans-periodic, transgender, and translational issues, to name but a few, increasingly structure and energize our readings and re-readings of literary texts. With this panel, we seek to move beyond a ruptural understanding of DH, with its underlying anxiety about disciplinary change, and to explore instead the potential continuities between humanities computing and existing methods.

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

[UPDATE] Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation (Nov 19-20, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 8:37am
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS: UPDATE

Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference
November 19-20, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Susan Phillips, Northwestern University
Associate Professor of English and Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professor

Faculty Roundtable:
-Prof. Natasha Barnes, University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor of African American Studies and English

-Prof. Peter Coviello, University of Illinois at Chicago
Professor of English

-Prof. Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of English

-Prof. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University
Frances Willard Professor of Screen Cultures

The River: Flows of Innovation and Exchange in the Global(i)zed English World

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 4:49am
Department of English & Modern Languages, North South University

We would like to solicit abstracts, with a maximum of 300 words, for papers addressing any aspect of our theme of innovation and exchange. The deadline for submissions is October 15, 2015. Please send your abstracts to conference.deml@northsouth.edu. All accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Selected papers will be published in our peer reviewed journal Panini. We will notify candidates of the status of their submission by November 30, 2015.

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