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Seeking Teaching Tools Submissions for Studies in the Novel

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:59am
Claire Barber-Stetson

Studies in the Novel is seeking pedagogical content for inclusion in the "Teaching Tools" section of its website. Content should address approaches to teaching either 20th- and 21st-century novels or interdisciplinary approaches to teaching novels, in general.

Submissions may include sample course syllabi, assignments, or short reflections on a "teachable moment"—a passage, a conflict, a scene, a pattern of meaning, or a character—from a novel. See https://studiesinthenovel.org/interact/teaching-tools.html for sample submissions and the complete guidelines.

Edited Collection: "Theory Lessons: Theorizing the Classroom" Deadline: September 1, 2015

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:51am
book editor: Becky McLaughlin / book publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This collection emerges from a growing interest in the ways in which theory can illuminate not just the products and ideas of high culture but also the ins and outs of everyday life. Taking the university classroom, broadly construed, as a site of theoretical investigation, this collection asks if theory can help us to understand classroom dynamics, offer pedagogical strategies, and illuminate current pressures on higher education that find expression in the classroom. As a forum for these issues, this collection particularly welcomes psychoanalytic, Marxist, Deleuzian, and feminist approaches, recognizing not only that these approaches are often in conflict but also that collectively they enhance our understanding of the classroom.

Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website: Graphic Novels and World Literature Teaching Tools (July 27)

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 10:50pm
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website: Teaching Tools

The editorial team at _Studies in the Novel_ is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website: https://studiesinthenovel.org/interact/teaching-tools.html

I am currently seeking pedagogical materials related to Graphic Novels and World Literature such as syllabi, assignments, textual reflections, etc.

This is a continuous project with monthly opportunities to submit.

ELN 54.2: In/Security

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 1:50pm
English Language Notes, University of Colorado Boulder

IN/SECURITY
Special issue of English Language Notes, Fall/Winter 2016 (Vol. 54, No. 2)

CFP: Feminist Ghosts: The New Cultural Life of Feminism

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 1:29pm
Diffractions - Graduate Journal for the Study of Culture

Call for Articles

Diffractions - Graduate Journal for the Study of Culture

Issue 6 | Feminist Ghosts: The New Cultural Life of Feminism

Deadline for articles: November 30

Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference Boston, March 10‐12, 2016 The South in the North

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 8:13am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature

Taking place for the first time in a non-Southern venue, SSSL's conference next year in Boston will focus on challenges to and reconfigurations of North/South binaries in regional, national, hemispheric, and transatlantic literary and cultural studies. The foundation of traditional US Southern literary studies on domestic regional difference and distinctiveness has been expanded over recent decades to encompass broader study of Southernness within national and global rubrics.

The multi-textual nature of religious-manuscript culture in the early realm of print in colonial India.

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 2:26am
Tapati Bharadwaj

The multi-textual nature of religious-manuscript culture in the early realm of print in colonial India.

This is a call for papers for a collection of essays/primary texts that looks at early colonial-imperial print and the nature of Orientalist scholarship, based on religious texts, that emerged with Sir William Jones, post-1780s. Manuscripts of the Hindu religious texts were often transferred onto print; but what exactly were the processes involved? How did native-brahmins look upon it as they assisted the Britishers in making the shift take place from a manuscript culture to a realm of print technology?

Expanding the Field: Rethinking Projective Verse and Mid-Century American Poetry

updated: 
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 5:21pm
The Charles Olson Society

The Charles Olson Society will sponsor a session at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, to be held at the University of Louisville, February 18-20, 2016. We are interested in abstracts pertaining to any aspect of mid-Century American poetics, but in particular those that build on and problematize the mechanics of projective verse. While "Projective Verse" has received ample treatment in studies concerning major poets like Charles Olson and Robert Duncan, other poets built on projective verse in their own ways, fashioning distinctive styles that, while tangentially related to projective verse, also created new poetic forms.

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