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[UPDATE] Beauty and Belief (deadline for abstracts: July 31; conference: November 5-6, 2015)

Monday, July 13, 2015 - 11:56am
Literature and Belief, a semiannual publication of the Office for the Study of Christian Values in Literature, Brigham Young University

The conference will include a wide variety of sessions and topics on possible connections among (and tension between) literature, aesthetics, theory, and belief, broadly defined. Sessions will include—but not limited to—

•Creative writers discussing connections among (or possible conflicts between) aesthetics and faith in either their own work or the work of others.

•The analysis of literary texts or cultural artifacts that in some way explore or embody one or more aspects of religious belief or practice, broadly defined.

Reconsidering Sodomy

Monday, July 13, 2015 - 11:38am
Northeast Modern Language Association

Following Foucault's description of sodomy as "that utterly confused category," literary scholars like Jonathan Goldberg and Alan Bray, among others, have continued to theorize the ways in which sodomy denotes no fixed set of bodily acts, but rather persists as a mobilizable category with social, political, and juridical valences. Sodomy necessarily persists, that is, in excess of the material bodily configurations it purports to police. Even so, much prevailing scholarship nonetheless returns to anal penetration as a presumptive and primary figuration in the discourse of sodomitical, disorderly, and/or illicit sexual acts.

Feminist Spaces 2.1 "Queering Feminism: LBGTQ and Feminist Intersectionality" due Oct. 1

Monday, July 13, 2015 - 8:19am
Feminist Spaces Journal

Feminist Spaces invites undergraduate and graduate students to submit academic papers, creative writings, and artistic pieces that adhere to this issue's theme of feminist LGBTQ+ intersectionality. The Supreme Court's recent ruling regarding same-sex marriage equality and the media's growing interest in transgender men and women has re-initiated discussions of feminist intersectionality with regard to the LGBTQ+ movement. The feminist movement has been divided into various waves, each advancing a different majority opinion of LGBTQ inclusion or exclusion.

Journal Seeks Prose and Poetry

Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 11:04am
Lehigh Valley Vanguard

Submissions in PROSE

Generally, we're looking for people who want to critically examine our society through their writing. This can be done in a variety of ways.

We accept op-eds, book reviews, film reviews, television reviews, memoir narratives, flash fiction, art reviews, and open letters.

Some current topics for consideration:
Intersectional feminism
Working class rhetorics
The body as a site of radical change
Anarchist thought
Exploring masculinity
Critical pedagogy
Community activism
Identity studies

Submissions can be 500-2,500 words. We welcome non-academic and even anti-academic writing.

Call for Book Chapters. Mater Dolorosa: The Representation of the Blessed Mary in Literature and Art

Saturday, July 11, 2015 - 7:30am
Universitas Press

In today's complex world religious discourse is especially crucial, considering that secularism is expanding around the globe. We seek contributions on the representation of the Virgin Mary in World Literature and Art. Comparative approaches are always welcome. Religious and cultural literacy is important for domestic and international politics, the practice of peace, harmony, justice, and social prosperity. Thus, this edited volume will help diminish religious illiteracy. Contributions are welcome from scholars in various disciplines in the humanities. Please send your proposals, along with your CV by July 31 to Elena Shabliy

LITERATURE TODAY: Call for submissions for October 2015 issue

Saturday, July 11, 2015 - 12:34am
Literature Today

we are inviting submissions for
October 2015 issue of Literature Today. Theme of our October 2015
issue is 'Love'. You can send us poems, short stories and one act
plays on :

1. love at first sight
2. poem/story/one act play in memory of a loved one
3. love as an aesthetic experience
4. love and teenagers
5. love and romance as predestined event
6. love relationships and role of gods
7. love and marriage
8. love as illusion
9. love in the age of Internet
10. lovers as rebellions
11. platonic love
12. love and immortality
13. disappointment/deceit in love
14. lovers as saints
15 any other relevant theme related to love

Special Topic: Faith and Violence in Literature (Spring 2016)

Friday, July 10, 2015 - 9:06pm
Julie Ooms / Intégrité: A Journal of Faith and Learning (Missouri Baptist University)

Intégrité (pronounced IN tay gri tay) is a scholarly journal published twice a year by the Faith & Learning Committee and the Humanities Division of Missouri Baptist University, St. Louis, MO. Published both online ( and in print copy, it welcomes essays for a special issue (Spring 2016) on "Faith and Violence in Literature." Essays may explore the interaction between Christian faith and violence in individual works or writers, in issues concerning teaching such works and writers, and in the pedagogical tasks educators at faith-based institutions of higher learning face when discussing and reflecting on the use of violence.

Seeking Teaching Tools Submissions for Studies in the Novel

Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:59am
Claire Barber-Stetson

Studies in the Novel is seeking pedagogical content for inclusion in the "Teaching Tools" section of its website. Content should address approaches to teaching either 20th- and 21st-century novels or interdisciplinary approaches to teaching novels, in general.

Submissions may include sample course syllabi, assignments, or short reflections on a "teachable moment"—a passage, a conflict, a scene, a pattern of meaning, or a character—from a novel. See for sample submissions and the complete guidelines.

Edited Collection: "Theory Lessons: Theorizing the Classroom" Deadline: September 1, 2015

Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:51am
book editor: Becky McLaughlin / book publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This collection emerges from a growing interest in the ways in which theory can illuminate not just the products and ideas of high culture but also the ins and outs of everyday life. Taking the university classroom, broadly construed, as a site of theoretical investigation, this collection asks if theory can help us to understand classroom dynamics, offer pedagogical strategies, and illuminate current pressures on higher education that find expression in the classroom. As a forum for these issues, this collection particularly welcomes psychoanalytic, Marxist, Deleuzian, and feminist approaches, recognizing not only that these approaches are often in conflict but also that collectively they enhance our understanding of the classroom.