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Marquez and Literatures from India- 25 July 2015 [UPDATE]-Call for Papers

updated: 
Friday, July 3, 2015 - 11:02am
Dr. Amith Kumar P V, Dept. of Comparative Literature and India Studies, EFL-University, Hyderabad, India

As the prophet of magic realism and an extraordinary satirist of political dictatorship, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's literary horizons are incomprehensibly vast, and the rigorous intensity of his writings is inexplicably multidimensional. Marquez challenges the luminal line between 'story' and 'history', and interrogates the public and private domain with an uncommon and effortless ease and clarity. He fuses the chaotic and the cosmic, the materialistic and the mystical, and invites us to participate in a magico-historical narrative of which he is an undisputed craftsman.

"Strange Bedfellows" (dis)junctions UC Riverside Graduate Conference 2015 -- Nov. 2-3, 2015; abstracts due July 30th [UPDATE]

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 6:05pm
(dis)junctions Graduate Conference / University of California, Riverside

"Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows."-Shakespeare's The Tempest (2.2)

UC Riverside's (dis)junctions conference invites papers and panels that push at the boundary of contemporary scholarship. Our critical focus, "Strange Bedfellows," is geared specifically toward innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to cultural, literary and theoretical texts. We are looking particularly for scholarship that emerges from the disjunction of incongruent forms, that thrives on the border of the unfamiliar, and that transgresses the boundary of the expected.

Resistance: Lives of Dissent and Revolt / SIUC / November 6-7, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 2:54pm
18th Annual Building Bridges Graduate Conference

Call for Papers

RESISTANCE: LIVES OF DISSENT AND REVOLT
18th Annual Building Bridges Graduate Conference
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, Illinois
November 6-7, 2015

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Shireen Roshanravan, Kansas State University
Dr. Stacy Keltner, Kennesaw State University

The theme for this year's graduate conference will address the powers and limits of resistance. What constitutes resistance and how is resistance embodied? How do we think through our experiences of dissent and revolt? As recent decades have been shaped by struggles of resistance, this conference considers the various possibilities that resistance opens for our futures of revolt.

Call for Publications - Verge: Studies in Global Asias (Special Issue: Asian Empires & Imperialism), due Aug 1

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 12:00pm
Verge: Studies in Global Asias

Verge: Studies in Global Asias is a new journal that includes scholarship from scholars in both Asian and Asian American Studies. These two fields have traditionally defined themselves in opposition to one another, with the former focused on an area-studies, nationally and politically oriented approach, and the latter emphasizing epistemological categories, including ethnicity and citizenship, that drew mainly on the history of the United States. The past decade however has seen a series of rapprochements in which, for instance, categories "belonging" to Asian American Studies (ethnicity, race, diaspora) have been applied with increasing success to studies of Asia.

Disability in Postcolonial Literature and Film due Sept 30, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 8:26am
NEMLA, The Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel invites submissions on the subject of disability as represented and narrativized in postcolonial literatures and cinema of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. How do these texts represent, complicate, and undermine the concept of disability? How do disabled characters function in these narratives and to what effect? How does disability intersect with issues of gender, class, race, and ethnicity? How does it inform the construction of citizenship?

Papers might address but are not limited to:

- Disability and war

- Disability, gender, and/or sexuality

- Disability on screen

- Disability and care

- Disability and international aid

- Disability and prostheses

Eco-narratives of the French Caribbean

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 9:40pm
Lisa Connell/NeMLA

Ecological readings of French Caribbean literature provide valuable insight into the relations between the landscape and subjectivity at the same time as they foreground crucial epistemological and aesthetic underpinnings of the region's cultural production. From the metaphorical stance exemplified by Aimé Césaire, Edouard Glissant and the Créolistes to the gendered spaces of knowledge formation illustrated by Gisèle Pineau and Maryse Condé, the connections between the land and identity, historical coercion and individual empowerment, invite readers to reassess notions of how the land inscribes the experience of colonization.

Global Feminist Film: Diversity on Screen NeMLA 2016 March 17-20

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 2:34pm
Joy Schaefer / Stony Brook University

Situated within the disciplines of women's & gender studies and transnational film studies, the Global Feminist Film: Diversity on Screen workshop will bring feminist film scholars, filmmakers and programmers together to discuss gender perspectives on contemporary practices of film production, spectatorship, history and theory situated in a transnational context. As film programmers and gender studies scholars, we believe it is necessary to discuss feminist film not only in a transnational and culturally diverse context, but also to bring practitioners and scholars together to discuss theoretical, aesthetic, political and historical issues from interdisciplinary perspectives.

Somewhere Else: Teaching Literatures of Refugee Experience in a U.S. Context (NeMLA, Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 11:47am
Justine Dymond

In "Refugee Memories and Asian American Critique," Viet Thanh Nguyen suggests that a category of refugee literatures outside of disciplinary borders of national literatures "allow[s] a different set of connections across time and space that point somewhere else besides assimilation into the nation and to affiliations with other people besides US citizens" (934). What connections are necessary to make, and what kinds of borders do we have to cross, in the teaching of refugee literatures? With Nguyen's words in mind, this roundtable session aims to explore our encounters with literatures of refugee experience in the classroom.

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