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UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm
UCLA

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Panel: Visualizing Diversity in Children's Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 11:55am
Diversity Committee, Children's Literature Association

Call for Papers
Visualizing Diversity in Children's Literature
Panel Sponsored by Children's Literature Association Diversity Committee
2016 Children's Literature Association Conference

1968 and Global Cinema - panel at SCMS Atlanta 2015 - Abstracts due AUG 5

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:46am
Society for Cinema and Media Studies

CfP- 2016 SCMS - 1968 + Global Cinema - 3/30-4/3/16 - Atlanta, Georgia

1968 and Global Cinema

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference

Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

Although scholarship exists on the late 1960s New Waves, especially on in French New Wave vis-à-vis May '68 in Paris, scholarship that puts cinemas on 1968 into dialogue with one another across national boundaries is surprisingly lacking.

'Facts and Fictions' - First Workshop of 'The Art of Identification' Network, University of Birmingham, Tuesday 13 October 2015

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 2:36am
The Art of Identification

The Art of Identification network, funded by a networking grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intends to bring together a range of academics and practitioners in order to explore the interconnections between practical techniques of human identification and the artistic representation of personal identity. The methods by which people have proved, or been assigned, their identities have varied over time – from Early Modern insignia to the contemporary strobe light of a retinal scanner – and the term 'identification' can also be taken to mean a number of things, including the determination of individual personhood via paperwork, bodily examination, verbal testimony, and digital recording.

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

The Novel and Digital Humanities: Seeking Teaching Tools (July 25)

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 2:33pm
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website

The editorial team at Studies in the Novel is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website. I am seeking pedagogical content that addresses teaching novels using digital humanities tools/perspective. Please consider submitting sample course syllabi, specific assignments, short narrative descriptions of your own experiences, or other appropriate content. The next deadline for submission is July 25.

Proposed Edited Collection on American Women Writers and Liminality 10 Dec 2015

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 3:03pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR A PROPOSED SSAWW EDITED COLLECTION
CALL FOR SENIOR SCHOLAR TO WRITE PREFACE

The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is seeking abstracts (250 words) for essays (7500-8500 words, excluding notes) on American women writers and liminality for a proposed edited collection. We also seek a senior scholar in the field of American women writers to write the preface to the collection and, if interested, join the team as a co-editor.

The Weird & the Southern Imaginary - Edited Collection

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 2:06pm
Travis Rozier / Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz; Bob Hodges / University of Washington

Keynote: The Weird & the Southern Imaginary will introduce the aesthetics and generic conventions of the Weird to cultural studies of the U.S. South and the region's local, hemispheric, and (inter)national connections. Contributions from literary critics, film and popular culture scholars, philosophers, and critical theorists will consider forms of the Weird in a range of texts (literature, art, film & television, comics, music) from, about, or resonant with conceptions of different South(s).

CFP Anthology on Girl Labor (non-western and new media)

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 1:45pm
Diana Anselmo-Sequeira

We are looking for original contributions for an anthology on the history of girl labor to be published by an American university press. We are seeking specifically for chapters that examine girl sex work and new media labor in non-western contexts.

Preferred topics include:

Girls and internet labor: blogging, gaming, lifestyle videos, micro-celebrities in non-western contexts

Girls and self-marketing in the web: seeking sponsorships, broadcasting one's image for profit

DIY cultures: Hello Kitty, "cute cultures," fashion, girls as producers of new consumer products

Gift cultures/ alternative markets/ hunter and gathering communities

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