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History, Memory, Grief: A 30th Air India Anniversary Conference, April 29-30, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 23, 2015 - 10:41am
Department of English and Cultural Studies, McMaster University.

History, Memory, Grief: A 30th Air India Anniversary Conference
John Douglas Taylor Conference, April 29-30, 2016

Department of English and Cultural Studies, McMaster University, Hamilton. Organizers: Chandrima Chakraborty, Nisha Eswaran, Sharifa Patel and Sarah Wahab

Unsettling Empire: Material Culture and the Global Economy in Nineteenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Sunday, August 23, 2015 - 10:27am
C19: March 17-20, 2016

In the nineteenth century, the question of the United States' growing status as a world power manifested itself not only through territorial expansionism, but also through the nation's economic ties to the rest of the globe. Whether through vociferous debates about tariff policies, or through competition with European powers over trade with Asia, or through consumers' metaphorical ownership of the world imagined through the possession of imported goods, nineteenth-century Americans were aware of the geopolitical implications of the United States' economic policies and entanglements.

Forgotten Books and Cultural Memory, May 27–28 2016, Abstracts due February 1, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 3:21am
Taipei Tech Department of English (National Taipei University of Technology)

Literary history is full of forgetting—both forced and natural. Manuscripts and books have been forgotten as a result of conquest, language changes, and politics. Other texts have been forgotten due to their physical condition: sole manuscripts are hidden away in archives, libraries burn, and paper disintegrates. Many medieval texts that are now central to the English literary canon, such as Beowulf, Piers Plowman, and the Book of Margery Kempe, were virtually unknown until the nineteenth, or even twentieth centuries. Later texts, from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, have been forgotten due to changes in taste, to their originally ephemeral nature, or to the sheer quantity of works that were published.

CFP: Native American Literature (47th Annual CEA Conference, March 31-April 2, 2016, Denver, CO)

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 3:29pm
Benjamin Carson / Bridgewater State University

Call for Papers, CEA 2016

Conference Theme: creation

47th Annual Conference | March 31-April 2, 2016 | Denver, CO

Native American Literature Panel(s)

This year's conference theme is particularly relevant to Native American/Indigenous/First Nations peoples. While all topics related to Indigenous literatures will be considered, including Indigenous poetics, Indigenous rhetorics, as well as issues of sovereignty, separatism, and transnationalism, papers that address the conference theme will be especially welcome.

Proposals will be accepted online at www.cea-web.org beginning August 15,
2015.

Submission deadline: November 1, 2015

[UPDATE] Southern Studies Conference 5-6 Feb. 2016

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 9:59am
Auburn University at Montgomery

Now in its eighth year, the AUM Southern Studies Conference invites panel and paper proposals on any aspect of Southern literature. The conference will be held 5-6 February 2016. Topics may include but are not limited to:

Fictional Religions (ACLA 2015)

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 9:31am
American Comparative Literature Association

Fantasy, science fiction, horror, and even more mimetic fiction in various media such as texts and graphic novels have long permitted the sort of free experimentation often celebrated (or bemoaned) in the American religious environment, though constrained by genre conventions, social contexts, market forces, and other factors. Thus, especially the "estranged" genres of fiction (pace Suvin) permit not only the utopian depiction of traditional religions as they ought to be and the dystopian depiction of religions as they ought not to be, but also the representation of novel religious forms—a space in which new fictional religions may be invented.

Connections: The Threads, Roots, and Pathways That Bind Us

updated: 
Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 5:49pm
New Voices Graduate Student Conference

The New Voices Planning Committee is proud to announce that we are now accepting proposals for the 2016 New Voices Conference. This year's annual conference will be held February 4-6, 2016, at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and will feature papers, panels, workshops, creative writing readings, and a poster session.

"Love and its Opposites" in Post-Colonial Narratives, ACLA 2016, Abstracts Due 9/23/15

updated: 
Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 2:29pm
Kenneth Sammond, Fairleigh Dickinson University

Introducing a conversation between Salman Rushdie, Christopher Hitchens and Deepa Mehta, the American scholar Deepika Bahri recalled how Rushdie had written that "The opposite of hatred is love; the opposite of tyranny is love; the opposite of censorship is love; the opposite of evil is love; the opposite of politics is love; the opposite of war is love; the opposite of God is love." This conversation, titled, "The Only Subject is Love," emphasized the centrality of love as a theme in Rushdie's writing and in the creative process. This seminar will have us explore the role love plays in reacting and responding to its opposites in postcolonial literature.

[UPDATE]: Consuming and Consumption (Columbia, SC): abstract due October 20, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 2:11pm
Association of Carolina Emerging Scholars

Consumption sustains and undermines modern life, from popular culture to our most privileged art. The Association of Carolina Emerging Scholars is seeking abstracts that address consumption in any of its many forms, including but not limited to the following: eating, buying, obsession, the reception of media, and the status-seeking public use of resources first called "conspicuous consumption" by Thorstein Veblen in 1899.

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