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Asia and the Historical Imagination: Essays

updated: 
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 6:41am
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Asia and the Historical Imagination: Essays is a edited collection of essays concerned with representations of Asia's past. The essays in this volume will complement a 3-day workshop that. This 3-day workshop will be held at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) from 30th July to 1st August 2015.

Last Chance to Book: 'Place-Based Arts: Brighton Writes'

updated: 
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 6:09am
University of Brighton

Place-Based Arts: Brighton Writes
Friday 29 May 2015
Sallis Benney Theatre, Grand Parade, Brighton UK.

Join us next week for this exciting one-day event on Place-Based Arts, exploring how location can provide diverse and rich triggers for writing and other arts based practices.

Highlights include keynotes from Iain Sinclair and Richard Kerridge, round table debates with artists and writers who have used Brighton as a source for their practice, a film screening of Ian McDonald's Brighton Bandits, and a range of parallel sessions with academics and artists presenting work and ideas relating to place.

Consuming Culture in Victorian and Edwardian English Literature (SAMLA 87)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 2:51pm
SAMLA (South Atlantic Modern Language Association)

From the proliferation and commodification of print culture in the 18th century to the Forster's Education Act of 1870, those who consumed - and the way people consumed – the arts and culture at large changed irrevocably in England. These factors - among numerous others- culminate Leonard Bast's feeble attempts to fit Ruskin's depictions of Venice to his basement hovel in E.M. Forster's classic Howards End. Bast's story, pushed to the margins of the novel, is primarily that of a working class individual attempting to better his position in life through the arts and culture.

MLA Options for Teaching Volume on Teaching Space, Place, and Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 1:22pm
Robert T. Tally Jr.

Essay proposals are invited for Teaching Space, Place, and Literature, a volume in the MLA's Options for Teaching series to be edited by Robert T. Tally, Jr. This volume aims to survey a broad expanse of literary critical, theoretical, and historical territory in presenting both an introduction to teaching spatial literary studies and an essential guide to scholarly research being conducted in this burgeoning field. Exploring key topics and pedagogical strategies for teaching issues of space, place, and mapping in literary and cultural studies, this volume will include valuable information for both specialists and nonspecialists in spatiality studies, and the essays should be of interest to teachers of undergraduate- and graduate-level courses.

H.D. panel, SAMLA Nov. 13-15, 2015, Durham, NC (abstracts due June 10)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 12:06pm
The H.D. International Society

We invite paper proposals for the "H.D. and her Circle: New Directions" panel at this year's South Atlantic MLA in Durham, NC, November 13-15, 2015. Send 250-word abstracts, brief bio, and A-V requests to rawalsh@ncsu.edu by June 10, 2015.

Papers may focus on work by H.D. and/or those in her circle (Bryher, Kenneth MacPherson, Marianne Moore, Richard Aldington, John Cournos, Robert Herring, Ezra Pound, Paul and Eslanda Robeson, etc.), and the thematic focus of the panel is open to a range of new approaches. Given SAMLA 2015's conference theme, "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts," papers that address connections to other art forms/media are welcome, although not necessary.

MLA Volume: Teaching Anglophone South Asian Women's Writing

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 9:06am
Deepika Bahri (Emory) and Filippo Menozzi (Kent)

We invite proposals for a volume in the MLA Options for Teaching series entitled Teaching Anglophone South Asian Women's Writing, edited by Deepika Bahri and Filippo Menozzi.

This volume seeks meaningful responses to the following questions: What do we teach when we teach South Asian women's writing? How do we teach it in a variety of contexts? How is our pedagogy changing in response to new developments: digital contexts, emergent genres, changes in the publishing industry, and growing anxiety about the under representation of nonanglophone writing?

Please visit website for more information:

Call for Submissions to a Special Issue of the Journal of Popular Film and Television on Holmes Onscreen (Tentative Title)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 7:32am
Tom Ue, Department of English, University College London

Heralded by The Telegraph as a 'global phenomenon,' BBC's Sherlock is now one of the most commercially and critically successful television series of all time. The global recognition of Sherlock, combined with the recent discovery of Arthur Berthelet's 1916 silent film Sherlock Holmes starring William Gillette in his only screen appearance as the famous sleuth, makes it especially timely for film scholars, students, and audiences to reassess the cultural legacy of Holmes onscreen. Forthcoming work by Hills (2016) and Poore (2016) argue strongly for Holmes as a continuing source of scholarly interest, spurring us to look at Holmes' filmic lives.

HBCUstory Symposium 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 6:19am
Crystal A. deGregory, Ph.D./ HBCUstory, Inc.

HBCUstory Symposium 2015 | Call for Papers
Theme | Reconstruction in an Age of Resistance: Respecting our Roots. Restoring our Rites.
Presented by | HBCUstory, Inc. + Fisk University

HBCUstory Inc., in partnership with the Fisk University, proudly presents the third annual HBCUstory SYMPOSIUM Oct. 9-10, 2015 in Nashville, Tennessee. Held in Nashville, Tennessee, a distinctively southern city that is home to four of the nation's 107 HBCUs, the two-day research and cultural symposium is first of its kind to convene Historically Black College and University (HBCU) researchers, presidents, administrators, faculty, staff, students, and alumni.

[UPDATE] Speculative Fiction – SAMLA - Deadline Extended

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 3:31pm
Lisa Wenger Bro / Middle Georgia State College

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres. The cohesive element that pulls works together is that there is some "unrealistic" element, whether it's magical, supernatural, or even a futuristic, technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way. For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction—from Gabriel García Márquez to H.P. Lovecraft to William Gibson. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.

Wrestling with the Angels: Exploring Stuart Hall's Theoretical Legacy (25-27 February 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 2:18pm
TU Dortmund University, Germany

Stuart Hall, who passed away in February 2014, was one of the founding figures of what is known today as 'Cultural Studies' and long-time director of the renowned Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at the University of Birmingham. Besides that, he was a central figure of the British New Left, founding editor of the journal New Left Review, and one of England's most charismatic public intellectuals.

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