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Poet-Artist Collaboration (abstracts due May 30)

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 3:45pm
SAMLA Conference Durham, NC, Nov. 13-15

This panel explores the theme of "literature and the other arts" through the unique dynamic of word-image interaction situated in the poet-artist collaboration. Paper proposals addressing poet-artist collaborations from any time period found in ekphrasis, illustrated books, book arts, children's books, broadside printings, digital projects, and museum/site-specific installations and exhibits are welcome. By May 30, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Anne Keefe, University of North Texas, at anne.keefe@unt.edu.

PAMLA 2015: 21st-Century Literature (Nov. 6-8, 2015); May 15, 2015 Proposal Deadline

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 12:41pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Fifteen years in, our twenty-first century literary traditions are beginning to take shape, and, indeed, it may be time to bring the poorly-named "contemporary" period to a close after its 70-year reign. Questions remain, however. Have we noticeably shifted into a new literary period? Or, is the defining crisis that will launch a new literary period just on the horizon? The 9-11 Attacks, globalization/neoliberalism, the Anthropocene, the collapse of a post-Cold War détente with the resultant repolarization of world powers and many other cultural shifts may serve as useful markers of an incipient yet-to-be-labeled era.

Border, Globalization and Identity

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 12:54am
The Dept. of English, P.D. Women's College, Jalpaiguri, W.B. India

UGC-Sponsored National Seminar
on
Border, Globalization and Identity
In collaboration with Indian Association for the Study of Australia, Eastern Region
Organized by The Dept. Of English, P. D. Women's College, Jalpaiguri, W.B., India

The JNZL Prize for New Zealand Literary Studies 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 - 9:32pm
The Journal of New Zealand Literature

The Journal of New Zealand Literature (JNZL) offers an annual prize for an essay in the area of New Zealand literary studies.
• The prize is available to graduate students and to emerging scholars who have completed their PhDs within the last three years.
• There is a cash prize.
• The winning entry will be published in JNZL.
• The prize is open internationally.
• Entries will be judged anonymously by the Editorial Committee and the International Advisory Board of JNZL. Judging will be by majority decision.
• The Editorial Committee reserves the right not to award the prize in any given year.
• Non-winning essays may be considered for publication in JNZL in the usual way.
Please submit the following:

The Contemporary: Culture in the Twenty-First Century, March 3-5, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 - 8:30pm
Princeton University

We are constantly under pressure to define the "now." When did it begin? What does it include? When will it end? Recent attempts to capture this moving target have offered an array of starting points--the end of World War II, 1968, the end of the Cold War, the start of the new millennium, 9/11, the 2008 financial crisis. These attempts have also offered an array of periodizing concepts--postmodernism, post-postmodernism, late capitalism, neoliberalism, the anthropocene, the post-civil rights era, the post-human. We propose to respond to and circumvent this pressure in two ways. First, by creating a dialogue between our periodizing concerns and recent literature and art.

Exploring Moral Interfaces: Private Worlds and Public Systems, 7th to 9th October, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 - 4:03am
The English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad, India

Exploring Moral Interfaces:
Private Worlds and Public Systems
An International Conference organized by The English and Foreign Languages University
7th to 9th October, 2015
"Everyone deserves a private life," says the female protagonist in the 1994 movie, Three Colors: Red by Krzysztof Kieślowski. The intrusive nature of the modern technologies that facilitate access—without consent or acknowledgement—to the private domains of people's lives further blurs the already hazy borderlines that separate the public from the private. The proposed conference will address some of the troubling issues relating to this phenomenon.

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