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[UPDATE] Geographies of Home in Ethnic American Women's Literature (NEMLA 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 2:15pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

From Louise Erdrich's Love Medicine to Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera to Toni Morrison's Home, symbolic representations of "home" mediate between the individual and the various geographies of home, both physical and metaphysical. How do literary works employ the tropes of location and dislocation, of belonging and exile, of inside(r) and outside(r), to highlight the complex relationship we have to the "place" that shapes our identities and destinies? We seek papers from any theoretical or critical perspective that interrogate the notion of home and belonging in gendered, aesthetic, political, and/or social dimensions in contemporary ethnic American women's literature.

Nobody's Disease: Theorizing Syphilis and Subjectivity

updated: 
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 1:46pm
Carrie Johnston, Quincy University

Dear Colleagues:

Please consider submitting a proposal by November 1 for the collection described below.

Nobody's Disease: Theorizing Syphilis and Subjectivity

Last call: Space and Place in World Literature (NeMLA 2015 Toronto, ON, Apr 30-May 3)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 11:52am
Alla Ivanchikova/NeMLA

Space and Place in World Literature (NeMLA 2015 Toronto, ON, Apr 30-May 3)

chair: Alla Ivanchikova

contact email:
ivanchikova@hws.edu

46th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association April 30 - May 3, 2015 Toronto, Ontario
Chairs: Alla Ivanchikova, Michael Modarelli
Area: World Literatures (non-European Languages)

Space and Place in World Literature

New Voices 2015 Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 3:40pm
New Voices

The New Voices Planning Committee is proud to announce that we are now accepting proposals for the 2015 New Voices Conference. This year's annual conference will be held winter 2015 at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and will feature papers, panels, workshops, creative writing readings, and speakers related to our annual theme, which is as follows.

[UPDATE]: What's Law Got to Do With It?: Diasporic Literature Post-9/11

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 3:24pm
Justine Dymond/Northeast Modern Language Association

In her 2010 collection of essays, Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work, the Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat writes, "There are many possible interpretations of what it means to create dangerously, and Albert Camus, like the poet Osip Mandelstam, suggests that it is creating as a revolt against silence, creating when both the creation and the reception, the writing and the reading, are dangerous undertakings, disobedience to a directive" (11). This session focuses on the literature of diasporic communities that disobey legal directives and constructions of personhood, citizenship and immigrant status in the post-9/11 era.

Food and Sustainability: Towards a Culinary Ecology, NeMLA April 2015

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 2:27pm
North East Modern Language Association

Interest in the fields of food and sustainability studies within the humanities is rapidly growing, in part due to their ability to investigate our perceived relationship with ecology. Food is a text that conveys identity, reflecting historically grounded or socially constructed attitudes through what is produced and consumed, both gastronomic and printed. Likewise, the connection between nature and culture as manifested in narratives allow us to recognize the discourse and disconnect between society and our environment, marking us through this relationship. Central to both fields is the interplay of humanity and environment, depicted in rural and urban ecologies, e.g. food deserts versus urban food jungles.

Critical Approaches to South Asian Studies Workshop FEBRUARY 26 & 27, 2015

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 2:14pm
South Asia Research Group at York Centre for Asian Research, York University

Critical Approaches to South Asian Studies Workshop
FEBRUARY 26 & 27, 2015

Call For Participation
2015 Critical Approaches to South Asian Studies Workshop: Questions of Method in South Asian Studies

York University, Toronto

Workshop dates: February 26th & 27th, 2015
CFP deadline: October 15, 2014

The Critical Approaches to South Asian Studies (CASAS) Workshop will take place on February 26th and 27th, 2015. CASAS offers a forum for exploring research on and critical discussions about the study of South Asia and the South Asian diaspora. Building on previous years, the third annual workshop will provide a space for scholars to share works in progress and engage with new ideas.

(Deadline Extended) November 13-14 Conference: Abiding Cities, Remnant Sites -- CUNY Graduate Center, CFP due Sept 30

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 11:22am
CUNY Graduate Center Department of Comparative Literature & Italian Specialization

Keynote Speakers: Elaine Scarry (Harvard) & Rosanna Warren (U of Chicago)

Deadline Extended to 30 September

If you can blow whole places out of existence, you can blow whole places into it. - E. Bowen

The students of the Department of Comparative Literature and the Italian Specialization at the CUNY Graduate Center present the annual interdisciplinary conference entitled Abiding Cities, Remnant Sites to be held on November 13 and 14, 2014.

"Celebrating 40 Years" / "Célébrons le 40e anniversaire de note association"

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 10:25am
Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures / L'Association des littératures canadiennes et québécoise

Formed in 1975 by members such as Joanne Burgess, Patricia Morley, Donald Smith, and André Vanasse, ACQL is celebrating its fortieth year in 2015. Like many of its related institutions, ACQL was founded in an era when state policies supporting official bilingualism were newly born and when postcolonial and other contemporary theory was only beginning to exert an effect on the fields of Canadian and Quebec literary studies. Much has changed in forty years.

[UPDATE] CHARLIE BROOKER: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES Edited Collection of Essays

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 8:38am
Charlie Brooker: Critical Perspectives

THIS IS AN UPDATED CFP WITH AN EXTENDED DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS. WE HAVE RECEIVED HIGH QUALITY SUBMISSIONS THUS FAR, BUT REQUIRE MORE TO COMPLETE THE COLLECTION

Charlie Brooker has one of the most distinctive styles in contemporary television. He has gained critical and commercial success in both fiction and non-fiction programmes, notably A Touch of Cloth, the Black Mirror collection and his 'Wipe' series. His distinguished style of blending comedy and cynicism underpin his work, and his dystopian narratives engage with some of the most pressing issues in the contemporary world.

The Long, Wide Nineteenth Century - July 31-August 2, 2015

updated: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 7:41am
The Dickens Project

Recent critiques of the idea of the "Victorian" have included attention to both space and time, challenging both the temporal imperatives that follow, perhaps fetishistically, the contours of Victoria's reign, and the geographical isolation of a culture (or set of cultures) in which people went to war or opted for diplomacy; traded (or refused to trade) objects and ideas; translated and plagiarized the works of other cultures; embarked on journeys to discover rivers, love, self, or God; produced and abandoned formal and informal empires.

[UPDATE] "To (Not So) Boldly Go: Science Fiction as Instrument of Colonial Enterprise" abstract deadline September 30, 2014

updated: 
Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 10:13pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

Both science fiction and postcolonial theory are concerned with troubling normative understandings of movement, diaspora, and hybridity. Indeed, "The Stranger in the Strange Land" is an oppositional trope that is at the heart of both science fiction and historical colonial encounters. The other-worldliness and futurity of science fiction has offered numerous writers an effective (and increasingly popular) medium to critique political, social, and cultural issues, and in many ways presents an ideal literary landscape to interrogate the colonial enterprise. Even so, there is a relative lack of postcolonial voices in the mainstream SF genre. What accounts for this silence?

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