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[UPDATE] Literature and Tourisms of the Long Nineteenth Century - due date June 3 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 9:49am
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

According to the OED, the word tourism enters the English lexicon at the dawn of the nineteenth century, thus institutionalizing the notion that travel is a necessary component of personal development. As crowds of earnest bourgeois travelers displaced the solitary young aristocrat on the Grand Tour a vast body of literature concerned with both mundane and exalted facets of foreign places cropped up to fulfill a new set of needs. Owing to the diversity of places to which individuals traveled and the many different reasons for doing so, these needs were diverse and multiform.

SAMLA Special Session: Afterlife in the African Diaspora: A Seminar/Workshop (Abstracts 5/15/15;papers 10/1/15;conf 11/13-15/15)

updated: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 2:30am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference

This seminar/workshop seeks to spark a critical conversation about how historical subjects and historical texts within the African Diaspora get re-fashioned, re-animated, and re-articulated, as well as parodied, nostalgized, and defamiliarized, to establish an afterlife for African Atlantic identities and narratives. Participants will consider how—as transnational and transhistorical sites of memory—particular performances (textual, visual, or embodied) circulate and imagine anew the meaning of prior personal and textual narratives liberated from their originary context.

CFP Shakespeare after Shakespeare (deadline: 06/25/15)

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 10:12pm
French Shakespeare Society

Call for papers
"Shakespeare after Shakespeare"
French Shakespeare Society 2016 Conference
Paris, 21-23 January 2016

On the occasion of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, the Société Française Shakespeare is dedicating its annual conference to "Shakespeare after Shakespeare". The conference will be the occasion for academics, theater, performance and arts practitioners to discuss the playwright's long-lasting legacy.

We welcome proposals (in English or in French) on topics such as:

The Coral Thomas Fellowship - $75,000 AUD

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 6:44pm
State Library of New South Wales

The State Library of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia) is pleased to announce that applications are now open for the Coral Thomas Fellowship.

The Fellowship includes $75,000 AUD. An additional travel bursary will be made available if the successful applicant is from outside Australia.

The Fellowship encourages deep and focused research into Australian culture, history and society, drawing on Australian and international research collections. It also will promote discussion on Australian history and culture through research which informs and engages contemporary discourse.

[UPDATE] Literature & Politics Panel @ SCMLA

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 12:54pm
Ashley Bender / South Central Modern Language Association

We seek essays that explore the intersection of literature and politics. This session is open topic. The deadline has been extended to April 6.

Modernism and the Anthropocene (edited collection, DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 5/15/15)

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 12:08pm
Jon Hegglund (Washington State University) and John McIntyre (University of Prince Edward Island)

We are seeking 500-word proposals for submissions to a collection of essays exploring the representation of the Anthropocene within modernist literature and culture. As a whole, the volume examines the emerging and complex relationship between Anglo-American modernism and its geological, climatological, and deep historical contexts, as it is articulated in a range of literary texts, movements, and expressions in the first half of the twentieth century.

Please email proposals and queries to
Jon Hegglund: hegglund@wsu.edu or
John McIntyre: jmcintyre@upei.ca

COLLABORATION & BETRAYAL

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 11:25am
SAMLA #87 -- Durham, North Carolina -- November 2015

In its aesthetic and political senses, "collaboration" has a twofold, seemingly contradictory meaning. On the one hand, collaboration names a creative and democratically communicative sharing between individuals, disciplines, traditions, etc. Yet, on the other hand, this positive sense is countered by negative connotations of traitorous and nefarious "collaborationism." While the positive sense of collaboration has found academic credibility in its interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary guises, the negative connotations of collaboration refer us to traditions of appropriation, marginalization, and usurpation.

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