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Conflicts and Resolutions

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 10:15am
Michigan College English Association

Call for Papers: MCEA Conference on Friday, October 16 and Saturday, October 17, 2015

Theme: Conflicts and Resolutions

Featured Luncheon Speaker: Poet Linda Nemec Foster

Location: Davenport University, Robert W. Sneden Center, 6191 Kraft Avenue, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 49512

Southeast Asian Gothic (edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 3:41am
Katarzyna Ancuta, Mary J. Ainslie, Andrew Hock Soon Ng

The contemporary rebranding of Gothic as a global phenomenon has led to an exploration of previously unchartered cultural territories in search of texts that are open to such interpretation. In particular, the recognition of Asia as a promising site for Gothic Studies reveals complex intra-Asian connections and cultural influences, shared heritage, philosophical and religious worldviews, beliefs, and values that foreground the need to investigate the local forms that are associated with Gothic contexts. This underscores a non-generic understanding of Gothic and the need to develop a methodology that can be applied to study a variety of texts.

[UPDATE] Wreck Park Journal Now Taking Criticism Submissions

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 5:01pm
Wreck Park Journal

Wreck Park: Interesting Literatures, Interested Criticism

Wreck Park is a double-blind, peer reviewed publication run out of Binghamton, New York. The journal publishes prose, poetry, criticism, and interviews, and is particularly interested in conceptual frameworks and developments that set to disrupt the canonical and standardized discourses of the contemporary academic and literary landscapes. The journal welcomes authors, poets, researchers, and thinkers whose work reflects an interrogation of engendered norms and traditions within societies, cultures, intellectual circles, and beyond.

CFP: MMLA Creative Writing II: Prose - Border(ing) Anxiety: Constructions of a Biopolitical Other (due April 5th)

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 3:40pm
Francesco Levato / MMLA

The force of biopolitics in contemporary society marks boundaries beyond geopolitical borders, inscribing otherness on bodies simultaneously necessary to the functioning of society, while abjecting them as dangerous to the very fabric of that society; an anxiety that reimagines and reproduces disciplinary power structures employed in the regulation, control, and subjugation of the collective, as well as individual, body. In this panel we seek to examine the material implications of the construction and bordering of such biopolitical otherness in our contemporary moment as imagined across multiple modes of literary and scholarly production.

MMLA Conference, American Literature I (before 1870) by April 5, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 12:56pm
Midwest Modern Language Association Conference

With the theme of "Arts and Sciences" in mind, we welcome papers exploring the relationship between the artistic and the scientific in American literary texts produced before 1870. Possible topics might include: representations of artistic or scientific innovation or discovery, explorations of pseudo-science and its cultural effects, the influence of literary texts on scientific and/or medical knowledge and practice, the influence of scientific and/or medical progress on the literary imagination, doctors and/or patients as characters in literary texts, art and/or artifice as theme, and the role of the arts and/or the sciences within the larger American culture.

Midwest MLA, Nov. 12-14, Irish Studies Panel

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 12:22pm
Midwest MLA

We welcome papers that explore any aspect of Irish studies, but particularly those that integrate this year's conference theme of "Arts and Sciences." Thus, we welcome papers that consider the ways in which Irish writers—or scientists—have utilized or explored science in their literature or art. This panel takes a broad approach to the conference theme and papers may consider these aspects: narratives of scientific exploration, myth and literature, literature and scientific culture, the scientist as literary character, or scientific discovery.

Reading Queer in Literature, Film and Culture (and Theory itself)

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 3:29am
The Apollonian: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies [http://theapollonian.in]

The Apollonian: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies (ISSN 2393-9001)
Call for Papers
Volume 2, Issue 2 | June 2015

FOCUS: Reading Queer in Literature, Film and Culture

Submissions are invited for the forthcoming issue of The Apollonian (Vol. 2, Issue 2) on the representations of the 'queer' in the various genres and sub-genres of literature, art, cinema, culture, critical theory, philosophy and history. The papers are expected to be scholarly in nature, and yet accessible to a fairly general readership.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

[UPDATE} Abstract/shuns DEADLINE MARCH 31

updated: 
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 5:45pm
Joshua Adair and Paul Walker

adair1@murraystate.edu pwalker1@murraystate.edu
What about those ideas you entertain but never fully develop? Those notions which are reviled and dismissed by peer gatekeepers? Follies so whimsical they unsettle even you?

We're looking for those submissions, the ones shunned by polite society and keepers of the status quo.

Let us be up front: Abstractshuns endeavors to become an ersatz academic journal, middlebrow at best. If Grindr/Tinder (depending on the orientation of the idea) spent a really naughty weekend with Notes and Queries, this would be the spawn, with Courtney Love and Jack Halberstam as godparents.

[UPDATE] Extended Deadline: Death, Violence and Religiously-Inflected Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 3:21pm
MLA 2016

Please consider submitting 250-word abstracts to the following panel at the 2016 MLA in Austin, Texas.

We invite essays focusing on representations of death and/or violence in U.S. religiously-inflected fictions of the nineteenth century.

Essays might examine consider, for example:

-the ways authors associated with religious traditions have embraced or rejected imagery commonly associated with death and/or violence

-the kinds of spaces in which violence and/or death are figured

-death and/or violence as metaphors for religious experience

-the rhetorical strategies deployed to use religion as a justification for sectional, racial, and territorial violence

MSA 17, Nov. 19-22, Modernism of Politics

updated: 
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 11:51am
Matthew Hannah / University of Oregon

The modernist period, as the theme of this year's conference suggests, was a period marked by revolutions of various stripes: aesthetic, social, cultural, and political. Among these, political revolutions often occupied center stage, both in terms of public awareness but also in terms of modernist praxis. Many modernists participated in radical political actions even as they experimented or facilitated experimentation with radical aesthetics.

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