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Mobilities: INCS 2015, Atlanta, GA April 16-19, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 2:16pm
Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS)

The nineteenth century has long been understood as an era of industrial growth, scientific discovery, technological innovation, and imperial expansion. Such sweeping global transformations relied on a complex web of relations between humans and machines, individuals and systems, ideas and practices, as well as more efficient and frequent movement across increasingly connected networks of space. From railroad travel to advances in shipping, from the movement of immigrants, enslaved laborers, scientists and colonial settlers, to the circulation of ideas, bodies, and/as commodities, nineteenth-century mobilities challenged and reconfigured the very constitution of subjects, nations, and cultures across the globe.

The Good Life and the Greater Good in a Global Context

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:13am
Laura Savu Walker

Dear colleagues,
I'm writing to invite you to submit proposals for a collection of essays that is tentatively titled The Good Life and the Greater Good in a Global Context. Please take a look at the brief description of the topic, its rationale, and research questions below. Feel free to add any other comments and questions and let me know if you are interested in contributing. My own essay examines the transnational dimensions of "that moral-intimate-economic thing called 'the good life'" (Berlant 2) as theorized by cultural critic Lauren Berlant and imagined by Pakistani novelist Mohsin Hamid in his latest novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (2012).

Uncertain Spaces: Virtual Configurations in Contemporary Art and Museums. Lisbon, 30 October-1 November 2014

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 10:39am
Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, IST-ID, IHA-UNL

International Conference - CALL FOR PAPERS

"UNCERTAIN SPACES: Virtual Configurations in Contemporary Art and Museums"

31 October | 1 November 2014, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal

Over the past decades, and especially since the generalization of the Internet, artists have been actively exploring the potentialities of new media languages and communities, often blurring artistic categories. Movements like Digital Art or Internet Art clearly demonstrate how these technological means came to shape challenging new territories for contemporary art, not only in terms of creation, reception and participation, but also regarding its preservation, collection, curatorship or exhibition.

LiNQ, vol. 41 - Apocalypse

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 7:45am
James Cook University (Australia)

Scenarios for the apocalypse seem to proliferate in popular culture. John R. Hall believes that numerous examples suggest that "an apocalyptic mood is no longer confined to cultures of religious fundamentalism" but is also demonstrated in "diverse mainstream apocalyptic references" (1). In the media, the apocalypse generates news headlines; in October 2013, the Sydney Morning Herald reported that scientists had found "evidence of an apocalypse on a planetary system similar to our own" (von Radowitz). In 2012, the belief that the end of the Mayan calendar on 21 December would mean the end of the world triggered thousands of blog posts. A poll of 16,000 adults showed 8 per cent suffered genuine anxiety that the world would end on that day.

Call for Peer Reviewers | Kaleidoscope journal

updated: 
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 8:01pm
Laura McKenzie | Durham University

Kaleidoscope is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal edited by postgraduate researchers at Durham University. A key feature of Kaleidoscope is that it embodies and connects diverse subject areas in a single publication, whether in the Arts and Humanities, the Sciences, or the Social Sciences.

'To (Not So) Boldly Go': Science Fiction as Instrument of Colonial Enterprise

updated: 
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 3:19pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

Both science fiction and postcolonial theory are concerned with troubling normative understandings of movement, diaspora, and hybridity. Indeed, "The Stranger in the Strange Land" is an oppositional trope that is at the heart of both science fiction and historical colonial encounters. The other-worldliness and futurity of science fiction has offered numerous writers an effective (and increasingly popular) medium to critique political, social, and cultural issues, and in many ways presents an ideal literary landscape to interrogate the colonial enterprise. Even so, there is a relative lack of postcolonial voices in the mainstream SF genre. What accounts for this silence?

'Regional Gothic', Collection of Essays, edited by William Hughes and Ruth Heholt, Call for Abstracts

updated: 
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 4:36am
William Hughes and Ruth Heholt

With the referendum for Scottish Independence scheduled for September 2014 and the Cornish having recently been granted minority status, questions about the dis-unity of the 'United' Kingdom are prominent in the contemporary debate regarding nationalism and regional identity. Regional Gothic will explore these fractures and the darker imaginings that come from the regions of Britain.

Modernist Times

updated: 
Monday, June 23, 2014 - 9:16pm
University of Western Sydney, Australia

Modernist Times
21 November 2014
Bankstown Campus, University of Western Sydney, Australia

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Brian Boyd (University of Auckland)
author of 'Why Lyrics Last', 'On the Origins of Stories', 'Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian Years' and 'Vladimir Nabokov: The American Years'.

The modernists were the most temporally-aware of artists. The innovations of Woolf, Mann and Joyce were focused on time: its elasticity, manipulability and centrality to human experience.

2015 NeMLA: Recipes for Power: Food and Literacy in French and Francophone Literature (abstracts Sept. 30th)

updated: 
Monday, June 23, 2014 - 7:19pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 46th Annual Convention

Are we what we eat? One's relationship to food is closely intertwined with many aspects of one's identity including ethnicity, social class, and gender, among others. Our perception of food production, preparation and consumption practices tends to influence how we see the people who are implicated in those practices. This session will consider, through the lens of food, works created by French and Francophone authors. The session will encourage reflection on how those artists are able to address questions of identity, assimilation, marginalization, and agency using food imagery.

The City in Contemporary Arab Women's Writings

updated: 
Monday, June 23, 2014 - 11:56am
NeMLA

This panel seeks papers that focus on the representations of the city in the literature of the Arab Uprising and in all contemporary Arab women's writings, both fictional and non-fictional: travel narratives, autobiographies, memoirs, testimonials, etc. Possible topics include but are not limited to: rebel cities, Utopian cities, cities at war, cities of exile, foreign cities, World capitals, literary capitals, sacred cities.

Please submit your abstracts to Rania Said through the NeMLA website.
https://nemla.org/convention/2015/cfp.html#cfp15207

[UPDATE] Second Call for Papers; [sic] - A Journal of Literature, Culture and Literary Translation; Open, Non-Thematic Issue

updated: 
Sunday, June 22, 2014 - 8:33pm
[sic] - A Journal of Literature, Culture and Literary Translation (www.sic-journal.org) University of Zadar

Second Call for Papers

(Open, Non-Thematic Issue)

[sic] – a journal of literature, culture and literary translation invites submissions for the upcoming 9th issue. We accept:

- original research papers: up to 9,000 words, including references and footnotes
- reviews and interviews: up to 2,000 words
- translations of literary texts: up to 9,000 words
- video essays (max 50 MB) – video submissions are welcome from all fields within the journal's focus

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