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Latin American Jewish Studies panel

updated: 
Friday, March 20, 2015 - 1:01am
Joanna L. Mitchell: The Mezzuzah and the Mestizaje

Latin American Jewish Studies panel at the Midwest Modern Language Association

We invite paper proposals for the panel "The Mezzuzah and the Mestizaje: Jewish Latin America" at the Midwest Modern Language. Presentations of original research regarding all aspects of Jewish life in Latin America are welcome.

The conference will take place in Columbus, Ohio, November 12-15, 2015. Presentation should be 20 minutes in length and may be presented in English, Spanish or Portuguese. Please send proposals of no more than 200 words to Dr. Joanna Mitchell at mitchej2@ohio.edu by April 5, 2015.

CFP: Gothic Tourism

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 4:58pm
Dr Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Prof. Donna Lee Brien

In recent years, it has become clear that 'Gothic' as a critical term has the potential to bring together varied perspectives, from numerous areas of enquiry. While there has been some interest in analysing examples of tourist experiences through a Gothic lens, this has mainly been limited to a small number of locations and disciplinary perspectives (London, Whitby and literary related subjects and approaches, for example). Thus, the topic of 'Gothic tourism' offers a new area that can be addressed from a number of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches.

Pedagogies in the Flesh: Teaching, Learning, and the Embodiment of Sociocultural Differences in Education

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 3:53pm
Editors: Sarah Travis, Amelia M. Kraehe, Emily Jean Hood, and Tyson E. Lewis

Current discourses surrounding education rely heavily upon developmental psychology and cognitive theory as the primary tools for depicting and explaining human experience and subjectivity. However, these tools prove to be inadequate, as they fail to account for the historicity and materiality of human development and personhood. Alternate approaches are needed if we are to understand the making of the self as a process through which socially and culturally situated bodies are construed and experienced within and against histories of racism, sexism, heteronormativity, ableism, and class inequality. Certainly the histories of oppression based on social hierarchies are addressed in social foundations literature as well as anti-oppressive pedagogies.

The Legacy of Performance: Oral storytelling and Music in Minority, Postcolonial, and Immigrant Literatures (6/10/15; 11/13/15)

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 2:37pm
MELUS at SAMLA

People in ethnic/racial minority groups, those from colonized countries,
and immigrants often carry with them a rich heritage of oral story telling and musical performance—from the Ananci stories out of Africa to the Klezmer music of Jewish immigrants. This panel invites papers on literary texts that represent, celebrate, rework, or otherwise engage with the conference theme of creativity in all of its manifestations. Topics might include, but are not limited to: the use of trickster figures in literature, reworking/rewriting of oral myths/legends, the use of music in literature, and the use of visual and/or performing arts in literature. Presentations should run between 15 and 20 minutes and allow time for discussion.

Conflicts and Resolutions

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 10:15am
Michigan College English Association

Call for Papers: MCEA Conference on Friday, October 16 and Saturday, October 17, 2015

Theme: Conflicts and Resolutions

Featured Luncheon Speaker: Poet Linda Nemec Foster

Location: Davenport University, Robert W. Sneden Center, 6191 Kraft Avenue, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 49512

Southeast Asian Gothic (edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 3:41am
Katarzyna Ancuta, Mary J. Ainslie, Andrew Hock Soon Ng

The contemporary rebranding of Gothic as a global phenomenon has led to an exploration of previously unchartered cultural territories in search of texts that are open to such interpretation. In particular, the recognition of Asia as a promising site for Gothic Studies reveals complex intra-Asian connections and cultural influences, shared heritage, philosophical and religious worldviews, beliefs, and values that foreground the need to investigate the local forms that are associated with Gothic contexts. This underscores a non-generic understanding of Gothic and the need to develop a methodology that can be applied to study a variety of texts.

[UPDATE] Wreck Park Journal Now Taking Criticism Submissions

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 5:01pm
Wreck Park Journal

Wreck Park: Interesting Literatures, Interested Criticism

Wreck Park is a double-blind, peer reviewed publication run out of Binghamton, New York. The journal publishes prose, poetry, criticism, and interviews, and is particularly interested in conceptual frameworks and developments that set to disrupt the canonical and standardized discourses of the contemporary academic and literary landscapes. The journal welcomes authors, poets, researchers, and thinkers whose work reflects an interrogation of engendered norms and traditions within societies, cultures, intellectual circles, and beyond.

CFP: MMLA Creative Writing II: Prose - Border(ing) Anxiety: Constructions of a Biopolitical Other (due April 5th)

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 3:40pm
Francesco Levato / MMLA

The force of biopolitics in contemporary society marks boundaries beyond geopolitical borders, inscribing otherness on bodies simultaneously necessary to the functioning of society, while abjecting them as dangerous to the very fabric of that society; an anxiety that reimagines and reproduces disciplinary power structures employed in the regulation, control, and subjugation of the collective, as well as individual, body. In this panel we seek to examine the material implications of the construction and bordering of such biopolitical otherness in our contemporary moment as imagined across multiple modes of literary and scholarly production.

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