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Destabilizing Acts of Witnessing (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 6:05pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

In the face of violence, acts of witness are crucial to reaffirm the humanity of those that have been dehumanized, rebuild social worlds, and assert new communal bonds. At the same time, efforts at witnessing are fraught with risk. Personal testimonies may increase feelings of isolation instead of yielding catharsis. Writers, scholars, and artists who strive to represent acts of violence risk turning suffering into spectacle and re-inscribing binaries of agency versus victimhood. No act of witness can encompass a person’s experience; there is always more to know than any narrative or representation could portray.

CFP: Asian Literature Session at PAMLA 2017 (Nov. 10–12, Honolulu, HI)

updated: 
Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 6:08pm
Satoko Kakihara, California State University, Fullerton
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

Asian Literature Session at PAMLA 2017

Friday, November 10 through Sunday, November 12, 2017

Chaminade University of Honolulu

http://pamla.org/2017

The Asian Literature standing session of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) is accepting proposals for the organization's 115th annual conference. The session welcomes proposals dealing with "Asia" and "literature" broadly conceived, from a wide range of historical periods. While this year's special sessions theme is "The Sense of Sight: Visuality, Visibility, and Ways of Seeing", the Asian Literature session aims to put in conversation papers that analyze issues of power and ideology more generally.

CFP (Conference): Postcolonial Literature at PAMLA 2017 (Honolulu, 10-12 November)

updated: 
Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 6:08pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

The Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) is looking for paper proposals in the topic area "Postcolonial Literature" for its 2017 conference. This standing session invites papers that explore any aspect of postcolonial literature. Papers that engage with the conference theme, "The Sense of Sight: Visuality, Visibility, and Ways of Seeing," are particularly welcome.

Call for Papers International Seminar on “Narratives of Violence and Terror in South Asia” 16-18 November, 2017 at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya, India

updated: 
Sunday, July 16, 2017 - 12:46pm
Department of English, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong - 793022, Meghalaya, India
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 22, 2017

“Terrorism will spill over if you don’t speak up” – Malala Yousafzai

Terror and violence have become markers of the times that we live in. Violence has become endemic in all walks of life. We experience violence at home and outside, both in private and public spheres. Violence manifests in different forms - as domestic, caste, communal, ethnic, racial, gender, national and state violence. In its extreme form, violence takes the form of terror and threatens human security. Practically no country or community appears to be safe in the post-9/11 world that we live in.

Sean O'Casey beyond Irish Nationalism, Louisville Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:17pm
Louisville Conference on Literature & Culture since 1900
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 1, 2017

Since the plays of Sean O'Casey are ripe for analysis beyond historical/new historical readings that examine them in light of Irish nationalism, I am seeking abstracts for a possible panel on O'Casey for the Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900 (http://www.thelouisvilleconference.com/) on February 22-24, 2018.  O'Casey's work, both that which focuses on the years just before and after Irish independence and that written during his years in England, offers varied resources for scholarship from the perspectives of colonialism/postcolonialism, Marxist theory, and gender analysis.

Narratives of Queer Space: An Inquisition in South Asian Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:22pm
NeMLA, https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16721
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

This panel establishes the presence of and explores queer themes and narratives in South Asian literature. While the focus is on the last forty years, we will also include more historic approaches as well. Participants may either focus on one country, work, or writer, or explore convergences and connections.

Reworking Labor: 2017 Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference

updated: 
Friday, June 23, 2017 - 11:54am
Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

Reworking Labor

2017 Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference

Conference Date: October 20, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Ann Stoler, Willy Brandt Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Historical Studies, The New School for Social Research

CFP: Afropolitan Literature as World Literature (edited collection, Bloomsbury Publishing)

updated: 
Monday, July 17, 2017 - 4:20am
Bloomsbury Publishing
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Afropolitanism currently inflects many academic and popular conversations about African literature. The term is mobilized to celebrate African influence in the world and to characterize the proliferation of African literature that is disconnected from the daily lives of average people residing on the continent. It refuses victimhood for Africans in the wake of patronizing representations by the likes of CNN, BBC, and KONY 2012 and sells a version of Africa ready-made for western reading tastes.  It represents a formidable ideology formulated by Achille Mbembe, among others, and a way to sell $30 novelty T-shirts to American hipsters.

Lives in Transit: Subjectivity in the Age of Migration (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 8:12am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

More than thirty years ago, Edward Said wrote in Reflections on Exile that “our age...is indeed the age of the refugee, the displaced person, mass immigration.” As migration becomes increasingly recognized as integral to contemporary societies, how does transit become central to how we understand urban spaces, communities, and the experiences of individuals within them? We understand transit as the movement of people, ideas, memories, or emotions, and what Jodi Byrd has described as “liminal existence” in “ungrievable spaces.” In what ways does the concept of "transit" model a rethinking of the relationship between individuals and postcolonial geographies? How does mobility constitute movement through both physical and ontological space?

Call for Chapters

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:30pm
Dr. Rajiv Ranjan Dwivedi
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

 Call for Chapters

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