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postcolonial

Joseph Conrad and the Uses of Influence

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:37am
M. Nezam-Mafi/ Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Even among the modernists with whom he is frequently grouped, Joseph Conrad, the Polish-born former mariner who, in his third language, reinvented himself as a British novelist, is a singularly resonant and deeply fraught figure.  Conrad’s biography and work anticipate both the figure and the preoccupations of the transnational and transcultural artist.  In a 1906 letter, Henry James wrote to Conrad, “No one has known – for intellectual use – the things you know.”  How Conrad rendered what he “knew” is critical to literary developments of the last century.  Much of the scholarship on Conrad, however, has focused on his impressionism or, more controversially, on his view of imperialism.  Was he, in his partial sympathy for subjugated people, and his attack

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

updated: 
Saturday, July 28, 2018 - 8:59pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Panel: Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

NeMLA Annual Convention: March 21-24, 2019, Washington D.C.

Cultural and Linguistic Intersectionality in 20th- and 21st-century Italian Aesthetic Production

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:30am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The 20th century is characterized by the sheer and fast-paced growth of human exchanges that, related to and flexibly caused by the increase of mobility, travel, migration and wars, affected the cosmopolitanism and hybridity of many writers. The often-difficult systematization of nationhood and the process of decolonization further contributed to the reconfiguration of social, political, religious, and cultural geographies whose boundaries were troubled by dynamics of trespassing. Italy plays an overlooked but significant part in the process of cultural displacement and aesthetic redistribution that characterizes the 20th century.

Local and Global? Representations of Climate Change in Contemporary Anglophone Novels

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:28am
Moira Marquis/ UNC Chapel Hill
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 28, 2018

This panel will present at NEMLA 2019

March 21-24 in Washington DC

Climate change represents a profound conceptual problem. It is both locally and global manifested. It is both knowable by science as well as created by the technologies science has enabled. How do contemporary Anglophone novelists represent these realities? From Margaret Atwood to Nnedi Okorafor to Hanya Yanagihara many contemporary novelists see their novels as both locally specific as well as globally relevant.

Memory Studies Association (MSA) Annual Conference 2019

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:27am
Memory Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

Founded in 2016 in Amsterdam, the Memory Studies Association (MSA) aims to provide a central forum for developing, discussing, and exchanging ideas about the theory and methodology of the broad-ranging field of memory studies.  The MSA welcomes all students, scholars, and practitioners interested in memory in both the public and private realms, no matter their home discipline, to come together to help advance the field and exchange work and ideas.

UPDATED: SAMLA 90 General Call for Papers

updated: 
Friday, June 29, 2018 - 11:21am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 13, 2018

SAMLA 90: Fighters from the Margins: Socio-Political Activists and Their Allies
November 2–4, 2018 ◆ Sheraton Birmingham ◆ Birmingham, Alabama

SAMLA is again pleased to offer prospective participants the opportunity to submit abstracts to a General Call for Papers. The General Call for Papers will be used to build programming from accepted abstracts that did not resonate with any of our currently published CFPs.

Atrocity Literatures: Othering or Solidarity?

updated: 
Friday, June 29, 2018 - 10:51am
Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Papers will be presented as part of a panel at the 2019 Northeast MLA convention in Washington D.C., which will take place from March 21-24, 2019.

Proposals must be submitted by September 30, 2018. For enquiries, contact Gayatri Devi at gdevi@lockhaven.edu.

Reminder: NEMLA 2019: Water as Transcultural Space

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 4:53pm
Délice Williams | NEMLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This year’s NEMLA conference includes focus on transnational spaces and “the complex processes of transculturation.” Since waterways such as oceans and rivers have historically been both media for and a contested sites of such processes, we invite panelists for a proposed session that will explore water and/as transcultural and transnational space. While we are particularly interested in exploring the cultural, political, and imaginative impulses that can work to turn waterways into transcultural spaces, we are equally interested in explorations of the forces that resist processes of transculturation.

Re-Imagining the Pacific - Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

updated: 
Thursday, August 16, 2018 - 3:16pm
Francisco Delgado, Borough of Manhattan Community College (CUNY)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel will examine what it means to re-imagine a region of the world that continues to occupy the imaginations of, among others, artists and scholars, vacation goers and/or environmentalists. The islands of the Pacific, for instance, were regarded by colonial explorers from Europe as utopias untouched by humankind. Beginning in the twentieth century, some islands were used as military testing sites by the United States and Europe with no regard for the Indigenous people of these locations. And most recently, as literary theorist Aimee Bhang explains, the Pacific “is laden with speculation, mostly of two kinds: one that anticipates the economic potential of the ‘Asian century,’ and another that projects its ecological devastation” (663).

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