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Liminality and Beyond: Conceptions of In-betweenness in American Culture and Literature

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 9:46am
University of Zielona Gora, Poland
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Recent theories explain that any cultural encounter engenders the particular and, more often than not, peculiar condition of in-betweenness. Even in the past, when the immigrants faced the assimilative pressures within the American society, their identity could hardly be discussed in essentializing terms. The condition of in-betweenness affected political, cultural, emotional, familial, professional, and many other spheres of life. A number of social critics and cultural theoreticians have coined variegated terms regarding the condition of in-betweenness experienced by the representatives of certain cultural groups in attempt to redefine their identities in American society.

Games 2019. Games and Literary Theory 2019

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:24am
Games and Literary Theory Presidency University Kolkata
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 30, 2019

Call for Papers

Videogames have grown into a global socio-cultural phenomenon and are now a primary concern of Literary and Cultural Studies as well as the Social Sciences. In a medium that sweeps across geographies (including virtual ones), however, the discourse usually privileges a certain section  when it comes to the representation of identity. In a medium, where roleplaying and playing in character is of prime importance, such an ignoring of the marginal and the diverse is indeed problematic.

Victorians Institute Conference 2019: The Nineteenth-Century Gothic

updated: 
Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 9:42am
Indu Ohri / Victorians Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 28, 2019

Seeking paper abstracts for the panel “The Nineteenth-Century Gothic” at the Victorians Institute Conference in Charleston, SC, from October 31-November 2, 2019.

The organizer invites submissions that explore the literary features, historical contexts, theoretical approaches, and adaptations/neo-Victorian incarnations of nineteenth-century ghost stories or Gothic topics. Papers related to the Gothic in the conference’s thematic territories of Charleston, Britain, Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean are especially welcome. Please email your CVs and 250-300-word abstracts to Indu Ohri at io3jc@virginia.edu by Friday, June 28, 2019.

Flows & Floods: Changing Environments and Cultures

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:09am
Nora Castle, Amul Gyawali, Harry Pitt Scott | English & Comparative Literary Studies, University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Flows & Floods:
Changing Environments and Cultures

22nd February, 2020|University of Warwick 

Keynote Address: Profs. Dominic Boyer and Cymene Howe (Rice University)

NEMLA 2020: Forgiveness in the 21st Century: Postcolonial Perspectives

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:10am
Saumya Lal
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

 

Panel: Forgiveness in the 21st Century: Postcolonial Perspectives

(NEMLA 2020, March 5-8, Boston)

In today’s world, where political narratives of apologies and amnesties proliferate, understanding the nature of forgiveness has become increasingly significant. The arguable success of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission – with its ideological investment in forgiveness, as affirmed by Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s No Future without Forgiveness – has impelled the world to engage seriously with the ethical possibilities of forgiveness. Yet, questions about the vexed relationship between forgiveness, responsibility, and justice remain unresolved. 

Decolonizing the Victorians

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 6:03pm
School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 25, 2019

Decolonizing the Victorians 

School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon

October 14, 2019

Org. University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies (ULICES-CEAUL), in collaboration with the Centre for Indian Studies

 

Keynote speakers:

Jyotsna Singh, Professor of Renaissance Literature, Michigan State University, USA

Neilesh Bose, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in History, University of Victoria, Canada

 

Chinua Achebe's No Longer at Ease at 60 (for Northeast Modern Language Association 5-8 March 2020)

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:39am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

As Chinua Achebe's second novel, No Longer at Ease, first published in 1960, arrives at its 60th anniversary, scholars have an opportunity to reassess its significance not only for African literature, but also for world literature in general. The story is set in the 1950's and richly depicts the cultural tensions of African societies nearing independence from Great Britain. It forecasts both the optimism and the disappointment that would characterize post-independence Africa. In dramatizing the fortunes of the Okonkwo family in rural Nigeria and Lagos, No Longer at Ease forms a sequel to Achebe's first and most famous novel, Things Fall Apart (1958), but is not as widely read and discussed as its predecessor.

Katherine Mansfield Journal Tinakori

updated: 
Monday, June 3, 2019 - 3:20pm
Katherine Mansfield Society in association with Edge Hill University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 12, 2019

Tinakori:

Critical Journal of the Katherine Mansfield Society 

Editors: Kym Brindle and Karen D’Souza

 

‘But this is all a dream you see. I want to come home – to come home’

Letter from Mansfield to Murry [18 March 1918]

 

NeMLA 2020 Panel: 'The New Lost Generation': African American Expatriate Writers in Paris, 1945-60

updated: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 5:08pm
Courtney Mullis, Duquesne University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 2020: Boston, MA

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

In his 1961 essay “The New Lost Generation,” James Baldwin argues that Europe gave the “new” African American expats of the late 1940s and the 1950s “the sanction, if one can accept it, to become oneself. No artist can survive without this acceptance. But rare indeed is the American artist who achieved this without first becoming a wanderer, and then, upon his return to his own country, the loneliest and most blackly distrusted of men.” Indeed, Baldwin asserts that African American expats in Paris gained a kind of liberation through their experience with a culture wholly unlike their own.

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