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professional topics

Creative Writing in the Age of Trump

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 11:31am
Dr. Abby Bardi/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel invites writers as well as literary scholars to address the question of political and literary engagement in our political age. In a political age, what happens to the novel or poem of interiority or introspection? Does literary material have to engage with the political? And if it doesn’t, can the political be read between its lines? What are the possibilities for creative work in an era that is increasingly in a state of emergency? Creative writers of all levels and genres are encouraged to explore these questions in the context of their own work. Paper proposals may be submitted on the NeMLA website. https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/User/SubmitAbstract/18240

NeMLA 2020 Roundtable: 'Getting Back in the Game': Professional Reinvention and Adaptation

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:09am
51st Northeast Modern Language Association Convention (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Despite an increasingly grim job market outlook, the humanities continues to produce PhDs in large numbers. Between 2007 and 2017, the number of available Assistant Professor positions in the field of English dropped from 879 to 320. During the same time period, the number of non-tenure-track positions increased from 21% to 34%. Yet in 2016, 5,500 doctorates were still awarded despite the massive post-2008 decrease in obtainable positions. As Vimal Patel wrote in a Chronicle article from September 2018, “The mirage has vanished.

Vampires, Zombies, Bodices, and Perps: Genre in Creative Writing

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Genre fiction (such as fantasy, sci-fi, suspense and mystery, thrillers, historical romance) has often been discouraged in creative-writing courses, even outlawed. However, in recent years, the popularity of genre fiction in the marketplace has challenged the boundaries of literary writing. This panel will consider some of the following questions: How do challenges to the traditional boundaries of genre impact the teaching of creative writing? How might fiction, drama, and even poetry address these challenges? How can the conventions and tropes of genre fiction be used fruitfully in literary writing? Both writers who work in or with particular genres and writers who have resisted the lure of genre are encouraged to share their work and ideas.

Creative Writing and the New Higher Ed

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the development of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop at the University of Iowa in the 1930s, creative writing courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level have proliferated. In 2008, there were 156 MFA programs in Creative Writing in the U.S; in 2016 there were 244. This roundtable will consider the status of international creative writing courses and programs within the context of the evolving picture of higher education. Some questions to consider: What effects might the spread of online education have on creative-writing pedagogy? Is creative writing as a field sustainable? As higher education moves to encompass a variety of formats and economic models, how will creative writing courses have to evolve?

Meeting the Evolving Needs of the Community College Professor in NeMLA

updated: 
Monday, June 3, 2019 - 1:24pm
NeMLA 2020 in Boston
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Roundtable: Meeting the Evolving Needs of the Community College Professor in NeMLA

This roundtable invites faculty at community colleges, junior colleges, vocational colleges and other two-year institutions to discuss the challenges and rewards that come with attending and presenting at academic conferences. With a focus on NeMLA itself, we would like to hear how NeMLA is doing in this regard: what successes or frustrations have you experienced here? What will you do differently or hope to do similarly in future? The goal of this roundtable will be to begin a conversation about these issues, and perhaps leave with concrete goals for the CAITY Caucus to pursue in supporting faculty from two year institutions within NeMLA.

OPEN CALL /II. Zip-Scene Conference on Analogue and Digital Immersive Spaces / #kaleidoscopicview

updated: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 2:46pm
Zip-Scene Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 1, 2019

Proposed dates:

10-12 November, 2019

Venue:

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Budapest, Hungary

Topic:

Interactive Narratives – the Future of Storytelling and Immersion in mixed reality mediums and performing arts. This conference aims to investigate whether XR/extended reality (VR/AR/MR) works will acquire a status comparable to film, performing arts and video games in the near future. On this basis, they are looking forward to papers that address narrative experiences enabled by XR and especially VR technologies. In addition, they want to challenge established storytelling strategies and instead more thoroughly analyse ways of creating engaging experiences. 

 

[NeMLA 2020] Detecting the Margins: New Perspectives on the Critical History of Detective Fiction (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:44am
Mollie Eisenberg, Princeton University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since its emergence from the periodical press into the first mass-market novelistic craze, detective fiction has occupied a liminal position in the margins of aesthetic legitimacy—and critical study. Detection is a popular genre, a “literature of escape,” that nevertheless seems to make a claim to, and find purchase in, more rarefied aesthetic and intellectual precincts. Michael Holquist styles detection as a guilty pleasure of the reading classes: “The same people who spent their days with James Joyce were reading Agatha Christie at night.” This panel asks what that liminal position might show us about both the genre and the conditions—theoretical, professional, material—of its study. 

Pre- or Post-? Periodization Problems in American Literary Study

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 10:58am
NEMLA 2020 (Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel for NEMLA 2020 (Boston) examines the scholarly, pedagogical, and professional problems posed by current chronological demarcations of “early” and “modern” American literature and seeks to propose viable alternative chronological models. The specific years covered by the traditional undergraduate American literary survey have a lasting impact on the American public’s sense of literary history, the dissertation topics of graduate students, the canonical visibility of authors who span chronological margins, the specific texts that receive attention in an author’s oeuvre, the networking of scholars, the availability of grant money, the publication contracts of major presses, and the creation of tenure-track positions.

NeMLA 2020 Panel: Experiences of Emerging Women, Trans, and Non-Binary Scholars in the Academy

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 2:36pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

51st Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

March 5-8, 2020

Boston, MA

This lightning roundtable seeks to amplify experiences of emerging women, trans, and non-binary scholars from a range of backgrounds across graduate, contingent, and junior institutional stature as they navigate careers in the academy. Participants will offer 3-5 minute “lightning presentations” that (a) share experience, (b) offer advice, and (c) demand change across micro and macro structures of the academy. Following the presentations will be ample time for open discussion between the participants and audience members.

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