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The Oswald Review

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 1:19pm
University of South Carolina, Aiken
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018

The Oswald Review is a refereed undergraduate journal of criticism and research in the discipline of English.  Published annually, The Oswald Review accepts submissions from undergraduates in this country and abroad (with a professor’s endorsement).

 

Guidelines

Submit each manuscript as a separate email attachment in Microsoft Word.  TOR discourages simultaneous submission to other journals.

All text must be in current MLA format, justified left only and without headers and footers.  Endnotes, if absolutely necessary, should be minimal.

 

Title page:

title of work;

author’s name;

Call for submissions: Catholic Library World

updated: 
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 12:27pm
Catholic Library World/ Catholic Library Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 13, 2020

Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World.

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is an international refereed association journal. CLW publishes articles that focus on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholicism and Catholic Studies. CLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries.

Hacking English: Lit, Productive Disorientation, and Digital Praxis

updated: 
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 12:25pm
Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Roundtable: Explores questions around how digital pedagogy entails challenge to or rethinking of the teaching of literature. Activities such as distant reading, multi-modal remix, archive building, and social-reading are explored for potential to be "productively disorienting" in how students and faculty approach literature. (10 minute presentations plus discussion).

 

Northeast MLA

April 12-15, 2018

Pittsburgh PA

Abstract

Teaching Terrorism: CFP for 2018 NEMLA Roundtable, Pittsburgh April 12-15.

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Call for papers for a roundtable at the 2018 Northeast Modern Language Association conference in Pittsburgh, April 12-15. 
Deadline for Submission: September 30, 2017.

This roundtable will examine teaching methods and strategies for addressing the fiction of terrorism in the contemporary literature classroom. With a focus on teaching after 9/11, and in a moment fraught with tensions about politics and secondary education (see, for example, the “Professor Watchlist”), this roundtable will also address the ways faculty can frame their classes—not only for the students they teach, but for a general public concerned with the politics of college and university faculty.

Deadline Extended: NeMLA 2018 Classics Today

updated: 
Monday, October 2, 2017 - 9:53pm
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 10, 2017

The art, history, literature, and philosophy of ancient Greece and Rome serve as the foundation of Western civilization. While the Classics have had a tremendous influence on subsequent cultures, the academy frequently keeps the discipline of Classics separate from modern literatures and languages. Yet the Classics have always been an integral part of cultural productions and the university itself; the word “academy” even has its origins in Plato. This roundtable will explore the current state of Classics scholarship, focusing on Classics as an area of study as well as its place in contemporary academia. Possible approaches include:
· Defining the Classics

· Current research trends in Classics scholarship

Pedagogy: Universal Design & Other Challenges—Accessibility Issues in the English Classroom

updated: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 10:44am
Charles A. S. Ernst / College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

250- to 500-word proposals, with title, for 15-minute papers/presentations on the challenges and opportunities in teaching students with disabilities in composition or literature courses.  Papers should address issues like the following:  teaching methods and resources, including universal design curricula, to support students with physical challenges (e.g., sight, hearing, paralysis), students with learning disabilities (e.g., cognitive impairment affecting reading, writing; attention deficit syndrome), and other disabilities; dealing with students susceptible to non-disclosure of disabilities; high school to college transition for English majors with disabilities; consideration of institutional liability risks of IT inaccessibility in F2F, online, and h

• Pedagogy: Considering Diversity in the English Curriculum

updated: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 10:44am
Charles A. S. Ernst / College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

250- to 500-word proposals, with title, for 15-minute papers/presentations on pedagogical considerations of diversity issues in the English curriculum.  Papers should address topics like the following:  curricular concerns and imaginative solutions to the development of courses treating ethnic literatures, spiritual orientations, and/or gender-identity readings; selection of materials and modes of presentation; multicultural vs.

• Pedagogy: Service Learning in English Courses—Composition and Literature: How Far Have We Come?

updated: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 10:44am
Charles A. S. Ernst / College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

250- to 500-word proposals, with title, for 15-minute papers/presentations on the pedagogical use of service learning in composition or literature courses.  Papers should address issues like the following:  Determining whether service learning projects—and what kinds—are appropriate to course material; matching key components of one’s English course with appropriate service learning projects; establishing relations with off-campus service learning entities; framing project assignments that enhance service learning while maintaining course content integrity; developing an assessment model to measure outcomes.  How many different service learning projects within an English course?  How long should such projects be?  Level of difficulty?  Challenges, risks,

Pedagogy: Stimulating Awareness/Provoking Engagement: Metacognition, Active Learning, & Supportive Technology in the Literature or Composition Classroom

updated: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 10:44am
Charles A. S. Ernst / College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

250- to 500-word proposals, with title, for 15-minute papers/presentations treating pedagogy on the use of metacognition strategies in the context of active learning & appropriate technological support in teaching literature or composition in classroom settings.  Metacognition encompasses “learning how we learn” activities and techniques.  Active learning presumes learner-based instruction, and may include problem-based learning, inquiry-based learning, collaborative learning, or other forms of active learning, including the use of technology—PowerPoint, SmartBoards, student response systems, Smartphones, IPhones, IPads, IPods, social media (e.g., YouTube, Facebook), whether in F2F, online, or hybrid courses.

Beyond the Classroom: Imagining New Spaces for Literature on Campus

updated: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 10:38am
NeMLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Short Description: This NeMLA panel invites participants to share their experiences engaging students with and through literature in spaces beyond the classroom, such as through common reading initiatives, student activities and clubs, and other co-curricular programming. It also welcomes speculative pieces proposing and evaluating possible new places in higher education for literature, literary study, and the humanities.

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