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professional topics

Ages and Stages: Women in the Academy, Revisted

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:40pm
Terry Novak/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Although much has changed in the academy in recent decades, many struggles related to gender and the “traditional notions” of the roles women fulfill and the roles men fulfill in the academy have remained strikingly rigid, to the detriment of individuals as well as to the collective institution. Women still bear a service burden disproportionate to that of their male colleagues. Women in the academy still struggle with childbearing and child rearing choices that men in the academy do not face in the same way. Women still face sexism and sexual harassment that their male counterparts escape. For women of color, the burdens are magnified.

Gender & Sexuality Writing Collective: The 26th Annual Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 4:33pm
University of Rochester, Susan B Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

The 26th Annual Gender & Sexuality Writing Collective

Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies

October 25-26, 2019, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

The Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of Rochester will hold a two-day writing collective on October 25-26, 2019. The writing collective will provide a lively platform for graduate students to workshop a paper with fellow graduate students and faculty from multiple institutions.

New Book Series: Precarity and Contingency

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:36pm
CSU Open Press and the Center for the Study of Academic Labor
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

From Sue Doe and Seth Kahn, co-editors:

 

We are excited to offer our first call for proposals for a new book series called Precarity and Contingency, published by the Colorado State University Open Press and sponsored by the CSU Center for the Study of Academic Labor.

 

Deadline: August 30, 2019

Decisions: Early October 2019

 

What we want to publish

Teaching and Engaging Shakespeare in the Classroom (NeMLA 2020, roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:01pm
John F. Maune / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

More than 400 years after his death Shakespeare is still taught in western universities and throughout the world. The number of published books related to his works as well as similarly devoted scholarly conferences seem to increase yearly. This means that what and how to approach teaching Shakespeare is not stagnant as might be imagined, but rather is expanding. The number of plays attributed to Shakespeare have seen some fluctuations, but the theory and scholarly research applied to pinch and prod his works continue to produce new stimulating insights. This gives the teacher more options on what to include in their lessons and by necessity, what to exclude. It is no easy choice deciding what to focus on in the classroom.

Teaching South Asia outside the English Department

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:36pm
South Asian Literary Association (SALA) Conference, Seattle, WA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

How does pedagogical strategizing work in teaching Global South Asian literatures in majority serving institutions located in areas where the student body is mostly white, or lacking in South Asian immigrant groups? How does South Asian literature find a place in general education core courses? What are some current practices and challenges that scholars of color specializing in and including South Asia as a text, experience in their classrooms? We are interested in sharing experiences on teaching, planning courses, writing curriculum development projects including South Asia centric courses both for the major and the general education classes that embrace the inclusion of literatures from the global South, especially from South Asia.

The Adaptive Academic: Building Skills and Leadership Culture Beyond the University

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 1:25pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 51st Annual Convention (Boston, MA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Graduate programs are primarily configured to equip students with the tools to thrive within an economy of knowledge production, but such a pedagogical framework takes for granted the structural inclusion of opportunities for developing competencies that are corollary to academic skills. Many of these competencies—planning and organization, collaborative management, transparent communicativeness, fiscal accountability, conflict resolution, stress tolerance, tactful coaching and active mentorship, to name a few—are increasingly being valued as essential for workplace success and leadership.

Creative Writing in the Age of Trump

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 11:31am
Dr. Abby Bardi/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel invites writers as well as literary scholars to address the question of political and literary engagement in our political age. In a political age, what happens to the novel or poem of interiority or introspection? Does literary material have to engage with the political? And if it doesn’t, can the political be read between its lines? What are the possibilities for creative work in an era that is increasingly in a state of emergency? Creative writers of all levels and genres are encouraged to explore these questions in the context of their own work. Paper proposals may be submitted on the NeMLA website. https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/User/SubmitAbstract/18240

NeMLA 2020 Roundtable: 'Getting Back in the Game': Professional Reinvention and Adaptation

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:09am
51st Northeast Modern Language Association Convention (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Despite an increasingly grim job market outlook, the humanities continues to produce PhDs in large numbers. Between 2007 and 2017, the number of available Assistant Professor positions in the field of English dropped from 879 to 320. During the same time period, the number of non-tenure-track positions increased from 21% to 34%. Yet in 2016, 5,500 doctorates were still awarded despite the massive post-2008 decrease in obtainable positions. As Vimal Patel wrote in a Chronicle article from September 2018, “The mirage has vanished.

Vampires, Zombies, Bodices, and Perps: Genre in Creative Writing

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Genre fiction (such as fantasy, sci-fi, suspense and mystery, thrillers, historical romance) has often been discouraged in creative-writing courses, even outlawed. However, in recent years, the popularity of genre fiction in the marketplace has challenged the boundaries of literary writing. This panel will consider some of the following questions: How do challenges to the traditional boundaries of genre impact the teaching of creative writing? How might fiction, drama, and even poetry address these challenges? How can the conventions and tropes of genre fiction be used fruitfully in literary writing? Both writers who work in or with particular genres and writers who have resisted the lure of genre are encouraged to share their work and ideas.

Creative Writing and the New Higher Ed

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the development of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop at the University of Iowa in the 1930s, creative writing courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level have proliferated. In 2008, there were 156 MFA programs in Creative Writing in the U.S; in 2016 there were 244. This roundtable will consider the status of international creative writing courses and programs within the context of the evolving picture of higher education. Some questions to consider: What effects might the spread of online education have on creative-writing pedagogy? Is creative writing as a field sustainable? As higher education moves to encompass a variety of formats and economic models, how will creative writing courses have to evolve?

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