Subscribe to RSS - professional topics

professional topics

Meeting the Evolving Needs of the Community College Professor in NeMLA

updated: 
Monday, June 3, 2019 - 1:24pm
NeMLA 2020 in Boston
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Roundtable: Meeting the Evolving Needs of the Community College Professor in NeMLA

This roundtable invites faculty at community colleges, junior colleges, vocational colleges and other two-year institutions to discuss the challenges and rewards that come with attending and presenting at academic conferences. With a focus on NeMLA itself, we would like to hear how NeMLA is doing in this regard: what successes or frustrations have you experienced here? What will you do differently or hope to do similarly in future? The goal of this roundtable will be to begin a conversation about these issues, and perhaps leave with concrete goals for the CAITY Caucus to pursue in supporting faculty from two year institutions within NeMLA.

OPEN CALL /II. Zip-Scene Conference on Analogue and Digital Immersive Spaces / #kaleidoscopicview

updated: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 2:46pm
Zip-Scene Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 1, 2019

Proposed dates:

10-12 November, 2019

Venue:

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Budapest, Hungary

Topic:

Interactive Narratives – the Future of Storytelling and Immersion in mixed reality mediums and performing arts. This conference aims to investigate whether XR/extended reality (VR/AR/MR) works will acquire a status comparable to film, performing arts and video games in the near future. On this basis, they are looking forward to papers that address narrative experiences enabled by XR and especially VR technologies. In addition, they want to challenge established storytelling strategies and instead more thoroughly analyse ways of creating engaging experiences. 

 

[NeMLA 2020] Detecting the Margins: New Perspectives on the Critical History of Detective Fiction (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:44am
Mollie Eisenberg, Princeton University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since its emergence from the periodical press into the first mass-market novelistic craze, detective fiction has occupied a liminal position in the margins of aesthetic legitimacy—and critical study. Detection is a popular genre, a “literature of escape,” that nevertheless seems to make a claim to, and find purchase in, more rarefied aesthetic and intellectual precincts. Michael Holquist styles detection as a guilty pleasure of the reading classes: “The same people who spent their days with James Joyce were reading Agatha Christie at night.” This panel asks what that liminal position might show us about both the genre and the conditions—theoretical, professional, material—of its study. 

Pre- or Post-? Periodization Problems in American Literary Study

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 10:58am
NEMLA 2020 (Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel for NEMLA 2020 (Boston) examines the scholarly, pedagogical, and professional problems posed by current chronological demarcations of “early” and “modern” American literature and seeks to propose viable alternative chronological models. The specific years covered by the traditional undergraduate American literary survey have a lasting impact on the American public’s sense of literary history, the dissertation topics of graduate students, the canonical visibility of authors who span chronological margins, the specific texts that receive attention in an author’s oeuvre, the networking of scholars, the availability of grant money, the publication contracts of major presses, and the creation of tenure-track positions.

NeMLA 2020 Panel: Experiences of Emerging Women, Trans, and Non-Binary Scholars in the Academy

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 2:36pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

51st Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

March 5-8, 2020

Boston, MA

This lightning roundtable seeks to amplify experiences of emerging women, trans, and non-binary scholars from a range of backgrounds across graduate, contingent, and junior institutional stature as they navigate careers in the academy. Participants will offer 3-5 minute “lightning presentations” that (a) share experience, (b) offer advice, and (c) demand change across micro and macro structures of the academy. Following the presentations will be ample time for open discussion between the participants and audience members.

NeMLA 2020: Intersectionality and the University

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 9:55am
Jennifer Ross, Nicole Lowman / NeMLA Graduate Student Caucus
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This session is a part of the 51st annual NeMLA convention in Boston, MA, to be held March 5-8, 2020.

For and Against Practice: Approaches to Teaching Professional Writing (NeMLA 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 10:11am
Callie Ingram & Jiwon Ohm / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This roundtable will provide a forum for participants to discuss and analyze their experiences and offer suggestions for teaching the multi-major professional writing course, more commonly referred to as simply “business writing” or “professional writing.” We especially welcome presentations that speak to and offer strategies targeting one of our three major concerns with the course: its decontextualized state, its reliance on non-neutral codes of professionalism, and the lack of pedagogical support often given to its instructors.

Two-Year and Four-Year College Institutional Relations

updated: 
Friday, May 24, 2019 - 12:25pm
Association of Departments of English
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

Recognizing the crucial role that community colleges play in the changing landscape of higher education, and the successes that they have had in educating and supporting a diverse student body, the ADE Bulletin calls for papers on two-year and four-year college institutional relations. Papers may treat the need for and reciprocal benefits of developing closer relationships between English departments and divisions of humanities at two- and four-year colleges, as well as the multiple pathways for developing those relationships.

Pages