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RMMRA Annual Conference CFP

updated: 
Friday, November 4, 2016 - 9:19am
Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2017
“Reformations during the Middle Ages and Renaissance”
Colorado Mesa University, Grand Junction, CO
June 22–24, 2017

Child be Strange: a symposium on Penda’s Fen

updated: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016 - 10:48am
British Film Institute & Birkbeck
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

‘Child be Strange’ is a one-day symposium on Penda’s Fen, organized in partnership with the British Film Institute, the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, and Strange Attractor Press.

 

Date: Saturday 10th June 2017, 10am–5pm, with a public screening at 6:20pm Venue: NFT3, BFI Southbank, London

 

Featuring a Q&A with screenwriter David Rudkin

 

2017 Circling the Elements Hip Hop Conference: HIP HOP IN DIASPORA:

updated: 
Friday, October 28, 2016 - 10:10am
Circling the Elements Hip Hop Conference (Albany State University)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 19, 2017

In the 1970s, DJ Kool Herc, a Jamaican born man living in the Bronx, helped spark the birth of a new genre/culture:  Hip Hop.  Popularized by Black and Brown marginalized populations in the United States, Hip Hop is a genre and culture now known around the world.  From its early inception until now, Hip Hop has evolved into a culture and art form with its own Diaspora.  During this, our fifth annual conference, we will explore how Hip Hop has reached a global audience and undergirded a whole new worldview for the last thirty years.  This year, we will come to know Hip Hop in Diaspora

 

The committee invites proposals/abstracts that:

Rebirth, Resurrection, and Revivification

updated: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 10:25am
Glossolalia, Yale Divinity School's graduate journal of religion
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 5, 2016

Rebirth, Resurrection, and Revivification 

Glossolalia, Yale Divinity School’s recently revived academic journal, is pleased to announce a call for paper submissions for inclusion in the Fall 2016 edition, on the theme of “Rebirth, Resurrection, and Revivification.”

A Political Companion to John Updike

updated: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 10:25am
Edited by Matthew Shipe, Yoav Fromer, and Scott Dill
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 30, 2017

Recent scholarship on John Updike—especially since his death in 2009 and the subsequent opening up of his personal papers at Houghton Library—has begun to shed light on his still overlooked, albeit extremely fecund, political mindset. A Political Companion to John Updike will seek to establish a new scholarly foundation for this exciting and burgeoning field in Updike studies by inviting scholars to submit essays that employ multiple perspectives and fresh interdisciplinary approaches to better understanding the kinds of political questions Updike’s writing addresses.

Beauty and Exile: Negotiating, Exchanging, and Redeeming the Challenges

updated: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 10:25am
Christianity and Literature East Regional Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 20, 2017

Christianity and Literature East Regional Conference

“Beauty and Exile: Negotiating, Exchanging, and Redeeming the Challenges”

March 30-April 1, 2017

Grove City College

Grove City, PA

 

[MELUS] DEADLINE APPROACHING: Religion and US Ethnic Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 10:25am
J. Stephen Pearson (U North Georgia)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 31, 2016

We invite papers exploring the representation or influence of religion and/or spirituality in ethnic U.S. literatures for a panel at MELUS 2017. Scholars might consider how multicultural encounters with religion "construct or deconstruct racial, gender, sexual, and class identities."

The MELUS conference (Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the U.S.) will be held April 27-30, 2017 at MIT.

Volume on Shusaku Endo's "Deep River"

updated: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 10:26am
Mark W. Dennis and Darren J. N. Middleton
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 4, 2016

The editors of a planned, interdisciplinary volume on Shusaku Endo's last novel, Deep River, are looking for one final chapter contribution.

Set in 1984, Endo's novel features multiple references to the Hindu-Sikh conflict of the time, and we are inviting scholars to consider writing a chapter on the novel in relation to Sikhism, Hinduism, Indian secularism, and/or religion and violence.

Final essays (7000 words, inclusive of endnotes) are due in late May 2017.

Since this is the final piece in our planned anthology's puzzle, interested contributors should send an email, by 11/4/2016, to d.middleton2@tcu.edu, containing:

Name

Chapter title

150 word abstract

Shakespeare Reformed – Shakespearean Reformations

updated: 
Friday, October 14, 2016 - 10:05am
Shakespeare Seminar 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016

In the year of the 500th anniversary of the publication of Luther’s theses, the Shakespeare- Seminar 2017 calls for papers that address ideas of reform and reformation in Shakespeare's works. We invite papers on the literary and cultural repercussions of the two major early modern reformations – the one prompted by Martin Luther and the one initiated by Henry VIII. Taking our cue from Hamlet's famous charge to the players to “reform it altogether” (Hamlet 3.2.36), the seminar seeks to address both questions of religious reformation and of more widely conceived notions of personal, political, cultural, or literary reform in Shakespeare's poems and plays. Topics may include, but are not restricted to the reform/reformation of

 

American Literature and American Religion - AARWR - CFP EXTENDED

updated: 
Friday, October 14, 2016 - 10:05am
American Academy of Religion--Western Region (AAR-WR), Religion in America
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 15, 2016

Scholars of American religion are well familiar with the problem that, in most standard narratives of American history, religion tends to play a minor and neglected role. A similar problem has been noted in the study of American literature. Scholars of American religions have worked to and may continue to help correct both of these problems.

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