Subscribe to RSS - religion

religion

"English Catholicism in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture" panel at ASECS Annual Meeting, March 31-April 3

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 1:14pm
Geremy Carnes

This seminar aims to focus attention on a segment of the English population that is often ignored or treated simplistically in scholarship on our period: the English Catholic community. Recent research by Gabriel Glickman, Alison Shell, and several other scholars has demonstrated that the Catholic community was active politically, socially, and artistically throughout the eighteenth century. This panel seeks papers from historians, art historians, literature scholars, and religion scholars on any subject related to the political or social activities or cultural productions of eighteenth-century English Catholics.

Jews and Christian Materiality 51st International Congress in Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 12-15, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:43pm
Shamma Boyarin

In the conclusion to her Christian Materiality (2011), Caroline Walker Bynum opens the door to an expansion of her discussion of medieval materiality and religion to Judaism and Islam: "Understanding the full materiality of Christian belief and practice," she says, "may help to clarify at least one of the ways [i.e., the material way] in which medieval Christianity (and, in certain aspects, its modern descendants) is similar to, yet differs from, its sister religions, Islam and Judaism" (273). This session proposes to go beyond Bynum's brief concluding survey, focusing specifically on the relationship between Judaism and Christianity.

JEWISH WOMEN IN MEDIEVAL ENGLAND (ROUNDTABLE) - KALAMAZOO, 12-15 MAY 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 4:34pm
Adrienne Williams Boyarin (University of Victoria)

It is generally accepted that there are few post-biblical Jewish women in medieval Christian art. When they are depicted, their Jewishness is usually unmarked; where they appear in narrative, they are often passive or eventual converts; they lack the anti-Jewish stereotypes so often associated with Jewish males. Sara Lipton has argued that this is partly because "the Jewess's femaleness trumped her Jewishness" ("Where are the Jewish Women?" in Dark Mirror, 2014). At the same time, Jewish women are ubiquitous in the legal and historical records of twelfth- and thirteenth-century England.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

Gender and Emotion: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2016, University of Hull, 6th - 8th January 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:27am
University of Hull

The grief-stricken faces at Edward's deathbed in the Bayeux Tapestry; the ambiguous 'ofermod' in The Battle of Maldon; the body-crumpling anguish of the Virgin witnessing the Man of Sorrows; the mirth of the Green Knight; the apoplectic anger of the mystery plays' Herod and the visceral visionary experiences of Margery of Kempe all testify to the ways in which the medieval world sought to express, perform, idealise and understand emotion.

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference: Shakespearean Transformations, 8-11 September 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:41am
University of Hull

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives

University of Hull, 8-11 September 2016

www.hull.ac.uk/bsa2016

Keynote speakers:

Susan Bassnett (University of Warwick)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Michael Neill (University of Auckland)
Claudia Olk (Free University of Berlin)
Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides)
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)
Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

A CRITICAL COMPANION TO TIM BURTON (Abstr. by 30 September)

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 6:29am
Prof. Adam Barkman and Dr. Antonio Sanna

Tim Burton is certainly one of the most popular directors of contemporary Hollywood. His oeuvre includes blockbuster films such as Batman (1989), Planet of the Apes (2001) and Alice in Wonderland (2010) as well as less profitable– but still highly recognizable - films such as Ed Wood (1994). His work with stop motion, evident in Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993), Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (2005) and the recent Frankenweenie (2013) has further popularized and updated a technique that has been fundamental in cinema since the silent era.

Looking for Public Humanities Pieces on "America"

updated: 
Friday, July 17, 2015 - 8:55pm
'Merica Magazine: for the unlikely patriot......

It is our contention that a magazine like this has needed to exist for a while. There needs to be a home for the complicated patriot, the unlikely patriot.The sociologist Robert Bellah believed that the United States had a civil religion that was to be contrasted with that of other nations. If that's true – and we think it is – then this is a magazine for the agnostics. What can one say? America seems like a pretty good idea – we should try it some time.

To get what we're up to check out our website at mericamagazine.org (that's "Merica," not "America," lest you accidentally go to the other - though excellent - magazine of that name). Check out especially the "About" section and the "Submission" section for a fuller idea of our concept.

Pages