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Bodies that Sell: Commodification and Cultural Marketplaces (Submission deadline : 20 Jan 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, January 1, 2015 - 1:04pm
English Graduate Organization - UMass Amherst

[http://umassego.com/conference/]

We make assumptions based on bodies all the time: what bodies are
normative, strange, dangerous, fragile, familiar, foreign, and so on. The bodies we see are always-already constructed and commodified within various cultural marketplaces. Bodies function as currencies, some of which have more cultural capital than others. This cultural capital lends visibility to some bodies, while rendering others invisible.

Call for Submissions: Aporetic Press

updated: 
Tuesday, December 30, 2014 - 11:17am
Aporetic Press

Aporetic Press is inviting the submission of proposals for edited collections and scholarly monographs in the fields of literary criticism, philosophy, media and cultural studies, as well as fiction and poetry related to the Gothic, horror, weird, speculative, cyberpunk and science fiction. In the case of literary works a sample chapter or an indicative selection is preferred in lieu of a proposal. Full manuscripts should not be sent unsolicited.

Subjectivity in an Object World

updated: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 - 11:07pm
St. John’s University Humanities Review (Vol. Thirteen, Issue 1/Spring 2015)

Deadline: January 25, 2015

Contact Information:

Editor: Kevin MacDonnell

Email: sjuhumanities@gmail.com

"The chief defect of humanism is that it concerns human beings. Between humanism and something else, it might be possible to create an acceptable fiction."

-Wallace Stevens

[Update: Deadline Extension] CFP: Multi-Discursions: Remapping the Topography of Thought

updated: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 - 6:55pm
Sigma Tau Delta Iota Chi (California State University, Northridge English Honors Society)

A colloquium to be hosted by Sigma Tau Delta Iota Chi Chapter, sponsored in part by the Department of English at California State University, Northridge.

New Deadline:
January 16, 2015

Conference Date:
Saturday, April 25, 2015
California State University, Northridge

Italo Calvino once asked, "who are we, who is each one of us, if not a combinatoria of experiences, information, books we have read, things imagined?" And while the question maintains its relevance, isn't it about time we turn our attention away from the individual, the "we," and ask this question of the texts produced and the environments in which they are produced?

Trinity Institute's 44th National Theological Conference - Creating Common Good: A Practical Conference on Economic Equality

updated: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 - 4:48pm
Trinity Wall Street - Trinity Institute

From January 22-25, 2015, a diverse group of scholars and faith leaders will offer strategies for developing a more just economy and instill the confidence to take action for social change at Trinity Institute's 44th National Theological Conference, "Creating Common Good: A Practical Conference on Economic Equality."

Passages @ Georgetown, Feb 21, Submissions EXTENDED to January 9, 2015

updated: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 - 1:47pm
Georgetown University English Graduate Student Association

- PASSAGES -
The 4th Annual English Graduate Student Association Conference
Georgetown University
February 21, 2015
Keynote address by Jed Esty, PhD and Samantha Pinto, PhD

Deadline for Proposals: EXTENDED to January 9, 2015

The middle passage, the passage of time, a secret passage. Passing as straight, the passing of a loved one, just passing through. Passages and acts of passing often involve movement and transformations that cross — and sometimes blur — traditional boundaries of place, time, identity, or perspective. This conference will explore how and why passages and passing occur, what they entail, and why they matter.

albeit Issue 2.1: New York and Los Angeles in the American Imaginary

updated: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 - 10:43am
albeit

The City That Never Sleeps and the City of Angels. Gotham and the Dream Factory. albeit is going bicoastal, and invites scholarly articles, detailed lesson plans, book reviews, creative pieces, and nonfiction essays exploring the place of New York City and Los Angeles in American culture. Topics for this issue can include, but are not limited to:

[UPDATE] Hostile Intelligences and The General Antagonism CALL FOR PAPERS

updated: 
Tuesday, December 23, 2014 - 1:32pm
Sara Collins/Pratt Institute

Hostile Intelligences and The General Antagonism
CALL FOR PAPERS

"Collective intelligence has to organise itself into a hostile intelligence — also in the sense of inoculating the host as a malignant parasite. An alien intelligence is not concerned with any orthodoxy, it proliferates and organises its own heresies".
–Matteo Pasquinelli

Circling Our Wagons Conference: Stories and Histories of Hip Hop April 16-19, 2015

updated: 
Monday, December 22, 2014 - 10:07pm
Albany State University Department of English, Modern Languages, and Mass Communication.

Call for Papers for Albany State University Department of English, Modern Languages
and Mass Communication.
Circling Our Wagons Conference: Stories and Histories of Hip Hop
April 16-19, 2015
Rap music is a black cultural expression that prioritizes black voices from the margins of urban America. Rap music is a form of rhymed storytelling accompanied by highly rhythmic, electronically based music. It began in the mid-1970s in the South Bronx in New York City as a part of hip hop, an African-American and Afro-Caribbean youth culture composed of graffiti, breakdancing, and rap music. From the outset, rap music has articulated the pleasures and problems of urban black life in contemporary America.

FEVER DREAMS experimental publication: CALL FOR PAPERS DUE MARCH 20, 2015

updated: 
Monday, December 22, 2014 - 4:00pm
FEVER DREAMS

FEVER DREAMS, volume one of possibly more, cheaply bound and even more cheaply produced, an outlet for graduate students & bored assistant or adjunct professors & wordplay enthusiasts & and peripheral dilettantes, an exercise in type layout & readership & experimental publications immediately sent down the memory hole, catering to an audience of one or possibly fewer, academic (read: "serious") in tone but absolutely not peer-reviewed, unplayful and archive-minded, a total bruise on the c.v., is looking for contributions.

JANE AUSTEN'S PRIDE AND PREJUDICE: A CRITICAL COMPANION [UPDATE]

updated: 
Monday, December 22, 2014 - 10:13am
Subashish Bhattacharjee and Mandika Sinha, University of North Bengal

"If the authentic test for a great novel is rereading, and the joys of yet further rereading, then Pride and Prejudice can rival any novel ever written." — Harold Bloom One of the most popular works of fiction in English literature, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813) has withstood the tests of time and has been revisited time and again with renewed critical engagements, adaptations and popular celebration. Regardless to say, several tomes have been dedicated to this particular work over the years, and many more continue to be produced with consistency that engage with the novel across areas such as the application of literary theories, in the context of cultural studies or even popular culture.

Sacred Literature, Secular Religion: A Conference on Cultural Practices, Oct. 1-3, 2015

updated: 
Monday, December 22, 2014 - 1:06am
Le Moyne College Religion and Literature Forum

Keynote Speakers: Amy Hollywood, Harvard Divinity School; Cynthia Robinson, Cornell University; John Lardas Modern, Franklin & Marshall College; Richard A. Rosengarten, Chicago Divinity School; Amila Buturovic, York University

lemoyne.edu/slsr

Charles Taylor recently claimed that we live in "a secular age," one in which a wide range of religious practices – and ways to opt out of those practices – are available. Today we might follow traditional forms of observance, establish new kinds of worship that are not strictly religious, or reject devotional pursuits altogether. Is Taylor right, or have these options always existed in varying degrees, in various periods and places?

Alchemy in Harry Potter

updated: 
Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 9:10pm
Anne Mamary and Christine Myers/Monmouth College

Call for papers for a multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary collection of essays on alchemy in the Harry Potter novels.

In a 1998 interview with The Herald, J.K. Rowling said, "I've never wanted to be a witch, but an alchemist, now that's a different matter. To invent this wizard world, I've learned a ridiculous amount about alchemy. . . . I [had] to know in detail what magic can and cannot do in order to set the parameters and establish the stories' internal logic."

We are seeking papers for a collection of new essays on alchemy, broadly conceived, in the Harry Potter series. We welcome essays on alchemy itself and the alchemical symbolism in the novels.

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