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Chronicles and Grimoires: The Occult as Political Commentary

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 1:46pm
Medieval Association of the Midwest: International Medieval Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan: May 12-15, 2016.

Whether seen in signs and portents, or read in grimoires or magic books, the occult in the premodern world is both marveled at and feared. A significant amount of the description of occult and sorcerous activity, however, also functions as political commentary, whether as direct criticism of secular current events or as a voice or conceptual space for the spiritual "other" in medieval society.

Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference Boston, March 10‐12, 2016 The South in the North

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 8:13am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature

Taking place for the first time in a non-Southern venue, SSSL's conference next year in Boston will focus on challenges to and reconfigurations of North/South binaries in regional, national, hemispheric, and transatlantic literary and cultural studies. The foundation of traditional US Southern literary studies on domestic regional difference and distinctiveness has been expanded over recent decades to encompass broader study of Southernness within national and global rubrics.

The multi-textual nature of religious-manuscript culture in the early realm of print in colonial India.

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 2:26am
Tapati Bharadwaj

The multi-textual nature of religious-manuscript culture in the early realm of print in colonial India.

This is a call for papers for a collection of essays/primary texts that looks at early colonial-imperial print and the nature of Orientalist scholarship, based on religious texts, that emerged with Sir William Jones, post-1780s. Manuscripts of the Hindu religious texts were often transferred onto print; but what exactly were the processes involved? How did native-brahmins look upon it as they assisted the Britishers in making the shift take place from a manuscript culture to a realm of print technology?

Columbia, Columbus, Columbianism: The Admiral's Metamorphoses in Nineteenth-Century America

updated: 
Tuesday, July 7, 2015 - 5:33pm
Zach Hutchins/C19: The Society of Early Americanists

As the historian Thomas Schlereth noted in an essay from which this panel takes its name, the memory and image of Christopher Columbus were appropriated by citizens of the United States for a wide variety of purposes during the long nineteenth century. A feminine personification of the new republic signifying liberty and progress was named Columbia in his honor; the exploits of a newly recovered historical Columbus were invoked in support of western expansionism and Manifest Destiny; and the naturalization of various ethnic groups was a process of Columbianism, whereby the Admiral's status as an immigrant to the New World rhetorically sanctioned the integration of Italians, Jews, and other groups into the American body politic.

CFP: Literature and Censorship (Deadline Sep 30, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 7, 2015 - 3:37pm
Sanglap: Journal of Literary and Cultural Inquiry 2.2

India is one of the few countries in the world to have a film censor board. And one of its recent casualties is a lesbian film significantly titled "Unfreedom." The current government has upped the ante by extending the ban culture of censorship from the aesthetic realm to the realm of everyday consumption with the ban on beef. The ban on Jafar Panahi, the Iranian filmmaker, continues and he continues to express himself in his art form in house arrest. The recent Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris has put the limelight back on censorship.

CFPanelists: "Unsettling the Slave Narrative" (C19 2016)

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2015 - 11:31pm
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

This proposed panel seeks to present new and challenging perspectives on the history of the slave narrative genre. Recent studies have sought to recontextualize and/or reconsider the generic contours of the Anglo-American slave narrative. For example, Daphne Brooks has suggested the development of a "sonic slave narrative"; Nicole Aljoe and Ian Finseth have drawn attention to the "journeys" of the form in the early Americas; Deborah Jenson has highlighted popular sources from the Haitian Revolutionary period; John MacKay has written comparatively about the autobiographical writings of American slaves and Russian serfs.

VI Annual UConn Languages Graduate Student Assoc. Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2015 - 7:09pm
Languages Graduate Student Association--University of Connecticut

VI Annual Languages Graduate Student Association Conference
University of Connecticut

CALL FOR PAPERS

At the Crossroads: Mapping Dichotomies in Literatures, Cultures, and Languages

Date: November 6, 2015
Venue: Thomas J. Dodd Research Center

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