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"Food, Feasting and the Flesh: Between Conflict and Communion" for 2016 IMC at Leeds

updated: 
Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 11:23am
Dr. Ya-shih Liu/ Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies

This TACMRS-sponsored session welcomes proposals that consider the various ways in which writers have explored the paradoxical notions engendered in the consumption of food in social and religious contexts in the Middle Ages.

[UPDATE] Deadline extended to May 27th for Southern Writers, Southern Writing

updated: 
Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 5:20pm
Southern Writers, Southern Writing Graduate Conference - University of Mississippi

The 21st Annual Southern Writers/Southern Writing Conference (SWSW) (July 16-18, 2015) is a University of Mississippi Graduate conference featuring both critical submissions (seminar papers, articles, works in progress) exploring Southern literature/culture and creative submissions (poetry, short stories, or novel excerpts) exploring Southern themes/settings.

SWSW regularly features panels on a wide range of topics related to Southern literature and culture. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

SRS 7th Biennial Conference 18-20 July 2016

updated: 
Friday, May 22, 2015 - 9:17am
Society for Renaissance Studies / Glasgow University, UK

School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow
http://rensoc.org.uk/

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Professor Neil Rhodes (University of St Andrews): 'Making Common in Sixteenth-Century England'
Professor Willy Maley (University of Glasgow): '"Patsy Presbys", or "Pulling the Wool Off Living Sheep": Milton's Observations (1649) and Ulster Presbyterianism'
Professor Evelyn Welch (King's College, London): 'Renaissance Skin'

Call for Papers

Asia and the Historical Imagination: Essays

updated: 
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 6:41am
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Asia and the Historical Imagination: Essays is a edited collection of essays concerned with representations of Asia's past. The essays in this volume will complement a 3-day workshop that. This 3-day workshop will be held at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) from 30th July to 1st August 2015.

Consuming Culture in Victorian and Edwardian English Literature (SAMLA 87)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 2:51pm
SAMLA (South Atlantic Modern Language Association)

From the proliferation and commodification of print culture in the 18th century to the Forster's Education Act of 1870, those who consumed - and the way people consumed – the arts and culture at large changed irrevocably in England. These factors - among numerous others- culminate Leonard Bast's feeble attempts to fit Ruskin's depictions of Venice to his basement hovel in E.M. Forster's classic Howards End. Bast's story, pushed to the margins of the novel, is primarily that of a working class individual attempting to better his position in life through the arts and culture.

Art as Ethics / Ethical Art in the Works of George Eliot (SAMLA 87)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 2:50pm
SAMLA (South Atlantic Modern Language Association)

In her famous essay, "The Natural History of German Life," George Eliot decried the recent attempts of English painters to recreate the "truthfulness" of Teniers and Murillo. Though Eliot would attempt to correct the errors in perception and representation through her writing, she continued to engage with other forms of art (paintings and music, specifically) throughout her life. In keeping with the theme of SAMLA 87, this panel looks for papers examining the moments in Eliot's works - her novels, poetry, nonfiction - wherein she contemplates other forms of art and their moral and ethical implications for both her characters and her readers.

MLA Options for Teaching Volume on Teaching Space, Place, and Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 1:22pm
Robert T. Tally Jr.

Essay proposals are invited for Teaching Space, Place, and Literature, a volume in the MLA's Options for Teaching series to be edited by Robert T. Tally, Jr. This volume aims to survey a broad expanse of literary critical, theoretical, and historical territory in presenting both an introduction to teaching spatial literary studies and an essential guide to scholarly research being conducted in this burgeoning field. Exploring key topics and pedagogical strategies for teaching issues of space, place, and mapping in literary and cultural studies, this volume will include valuable information for both specialists and nonspecialists in spatiality studies, and the essays should be of interest to teachers of undergraduate- and graduate-level courses.

Call for Submissions to a Special Issue of the Journal of Popular Film and Television on Holmes Onscreen (Tentative Title)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 7:32am
Tom Ue, Department of English, University College London

Heralded by The Telegraph as a 'global phenomenon,' BBC's Sherlock is now one of the most commercially and critically successful television series of all time. The global recognition of Sherlock, combined with the recent discovery of Arthur Berthelet's 1916 silent film Sherlock Holmes starring William Gillette in his only screen appearance as the famous sleuth, makes it especially timely for film scholars, students, and audiences to reassess the cultural legacy of Holmes onscreen. Forthcoming work by Hills (2016) and Poore (2016) argue strongly for Holmes as a continuing source of scholarly interest, spurring us to look at Holmes' filmic lives.

[UPDATE] Speculative Fiction – SAMLA - Deadline Extended

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 3:31pm
Lisa Wenger Bro / Middle Georgia State College

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres. The cohesive element that pulls works together is that there is some "unrealistic" element, whether it's magical, supernatural, or even a futuristic, technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way. For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction—from Gabriel García Márquez to H.P. Lovecraft to William Gibson. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.

HUMOROUS > DISRUPTIONS: Humour and Technologies of Disruption in Feminist Media Theory and Practice

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 12:56pm
Synoptique: An Online Journal of Film and Moving Image Studies

With its insightful and quirky brand of humour, Issa Rae's popular web series The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl (2011- 2013) has shown how alternative pathways for the production, circulation and reception of interactive new media also makes possible a more expansive approach to the question of who and what can be funny. Much of the humour in Awkward Black Girl arises from the social ineptitude of J, its titular character. The series' characterization of her subjectivity as multi-layered and complex also prompts interrogation of gender and racial stereotypes through humour, and the ways in which digital platforms create opportunities for women and minority media-makers to develop their projects outside of mainstream media industries.

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