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CFP - Digital Humanities in Biblical Studies and Theology

updated: 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 10:08am
Lucas Gworek DE GRUYTER
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 31, 2019

EDITED BY

Dr. Claire Clivaz, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (Lausanne, CH), Vital-IT
Dr. Garrick V. Allen
, Dublin City University (Ireland)

 

DESCRIPTION

"Open Theology" (http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/opth) invites submissions for the topical issue "Digital Humanities in Biblical Studies and Theology".

Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 9:29am
Dr. Joshua King/ Baylor University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 15, 2019

This flightless, multi-site conference (Sept. 18-21, 2019) invites interdisciplinary attention to confluences between environmental and religious perspectives and practices in the long Anglophone nineteenth century (1780-1900). Since that century, anthropogenic climate change has rapidly accelerated, and in response to this legacy we will avoid air travel by digitally connecting events at several conference sites in the United States and the United Kingdom. In addition, this method of networking, by lowering barriers of cost and transportation, promises to enable a more diverse and inclusive range of participation than is often possible at international conferences.

CFP "Existential Conceptions of the Relationship between Philosophy and Theology"

updated: 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 9:27am
Lucas Gworek DE GRUYTER
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 10, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS
for a topical issue of "Open Theology" journal
EXISTENTIAL CONCEPTIONS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY

 

Edited by:
Steven DeLay (Wake Forest University)
Nikolaas Deketelaere (University of Oxford)
Elizabeth Li (University of Oxford)

 

DESCRIPTION

Life Writing and the Life of Faith

updated: 
Thursday, February 21, 2019 - 9:00am
Conference on Christianity and Literature / MLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 22, 2019

Session Hosted by the Conference on Christianity and Literature at the 2020 MLA Convention,

Seattle, WA, 9-12 January 2020

 

SEMA 2019 - Medieval Gateways: Threshold, Transition, Exchange

updated: 
Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:45am
Southeastern Medieval Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 3, 2019

Southeastern Medieval Association Conference

November 14-16, 2019

Greensboro, NC

~~~~~

Medieval Gateways: Threshold, Transition, Exchange

 

The Southeastern Medieval Association is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its 2019 Conference to be held at UNC-Greensboro, co-sponsored by UNCG, North Carolina Wesleyan College and Wake Forest University.

 

"Existential Conceptions of the Relationship between Philosophy and Theology"

updated: 
Monday, February 11, 2019 - 4:12am
Open Theology (De Gruyter)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 10, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

For a special issue of Open Theology: “Existential Conceptions of the Relationship between Philosophy and Theology”

 

Edited by:                   

Nikolaas Deketelaere (BalliolCollege, University of Oxford) 

Dr. Steven DeLay (Wake Forest University)

Elizabeth Li (Mansfield College, University of Oxford)

 

Invited contributors: Dr. Kate Kirkpatrick (author of Sartre and TheologySartre on Sinand The Mystical Sources of Existentialist Thought)            

 

DESCRIPTION

Barbarous Tongues: Middle English and Beyond

updated: 
Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 12:25pm
MLA Middle English Forum
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 3, 2019

Middle English language and literature’s status is a perennial matter of debate, whose immediate political subtexts include race, class, gender, and nation. Middle English texts themselves categorize barbarous tongues, mother tongues, lay and learned languages. How do medieval linguistic taxonomies politicize identity and territory, medieval or postmedieval? Can we locate concepts like the vulgar tongue and vernacular eloquence in our current critical lexicon? What is at stake in contemporary deployments of categories like classical, vernacular, or sacred language and world, national, provincial, or cosmopolitan language? How do these and other linguistic terms participate in the broader cultural politics of labels like barbarism and civilization?

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