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(Un)stable Identities: How the Self is Forged and Found - March 19, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 8:05pm
English Graduate Student Association, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: (Un)Stable Identities: How the Self is Forged and Found

"There will be time / to prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet."­ Eliot, Prufrock
"We know what we are, but now what we may be."­ Shakespeare, Hamlet
"I am not an angel...and I will not be one till I die. I will be myself." ­ Bronte, Jane Eyre

Registration now open! CFP: Jan. 20th for this Texas Spring Conference on Medieval/Renaissance Thought

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 2:13pm
Sam Houston State University's Second International Conference on Med/Ren Thought

Attention: All Scholars!!

Don't miss this opportunity to have your work considered to be on the program at this unique Texas conference of medieval and renaissance scholars celebrating beauty!

Send your 250-300 word abstract to Dr. Darci Hill, Conference Director via email to dr.darci.hi@gmail.com. Papers exploring any aspect relating to the medieval and renaissance time period are welcome. Disciplines typically represented at this conference are, art, music, history, philosophy, linguistics, literature, theater, and dance.

Our plenary speaker is Dr. Caroline Bruzelius, art historian from Duke University, whose fascinating research focuses on medieval cathedrals.

Heresy, Belief, and Ideology: Dissent in Politics and Religion

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Monday, December 28, 2015 - 7:32pm
Second Conference of the International Society for Heresy Studies

The International Society for Heresy Studies announces a Call for Papers for its second biennial conference at New York University, June 1-3, 2016. The conference theme will broadly focus on ideological aspects of heresy in both religion and politics. Throughout history, definitions of "heresy" have been crucial to defining "orthodox" belief, worship, and practice. Indeed, every faith, ideology, and institution must struggle over what is deemed heretical as part of defining what is deemed normative, and it is hard to imagine any ideology (even an anti-ideology ideology) that does not draw a boundary to mark what is subversive or unacceptable.

CFPanelists: "Black Narratives of Home/Property in American Literature" [DUE 1.25.16]

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Sunday, December 27, 2015 - 6:01pm
American Studies Association

Toni Morrison writes in her first novel 'The Bluest Eye' (1970): "Knowing that there was such a thing as outdoors bred in us a hunger for property, for ownership. The firm possession of a yard, a porch, a grape arbor. Propertied black people spent all their energies, all their love, on their nests" (18). This passage brings immediately to mind the thematic preoccupation with property and landholding throughout American literary history—from Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'House of the Seven Gables' to William Faulkner's Sutpen's Hundred, Willa Cather's Blue Mesa to Arthur Miller's Willy Loman—and the place of Black narrative within that tradition.

Special Issue on Robert Frost and Wallace Stevens

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Friday, December 25, 2015 - 3:05pm
Wallace Stevens Journal

The Wallace Stevens Journal invites submissions of full-length essays for a Spring 2017 special issue on Wallace Stevens and Robert Frost. Any aspect of the poets' works or lives may be proposed. Editors welcome innovative twists on traditional topics, and they are equally interested in understudied topics that have urgency in the contemporary world of theory and criticism, such as colonialism and postcoloniality, disability studies, ecocriticism, technopolitics, gender studies, and popular/mass culture.

10th Annual Landscape, Space, and Place Conference March 3-5, 2016, Abstracts DUE: Jan. 11, 2016

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Thursday, December 24, 2015 - 7:42pm
Indiana University Landscape Studies and Department of Geography

Landscape studies is multidisciplinary and has far-reaching academic connections and a diverse array of approaches that give the field its strength. The goal of the Landscape, Space and Place (LSP) conference is to bring together scholars across various disciplinary backgrounds to exchange ideas and consider novel intellectual perspectives. We also hope to encourage a more integrative framework upon which to build the future of the field. As part of the 10th anniversary of this rich and diverse conference, we are inviting faculty and graduate students to contribute abstracts that will comprise workshop-type panels and foster generative discussions about the role of space and place in our research.

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