Subscribe to RSS - religion

religion

Special Session: Creative Writing inspired by All Things Medieval DL: Nov 1st

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:30am
Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought

Abstracts are invited for creative writing related to the medieval period. Please submit your 250- to 300-word proposal for your short story, poem, or novel excerpt set during the Middle Ages or addressing topics unique to the medieval period, including contemporary works inspired in some way by medieval ideas. Attach to your abstract a 100-word excerpt of your proposed creative work.

Deadline for proposals: Nov. 1, 2015.
Send proposals and excerpts for this special session on creative writing to the Conference Director, Dr. Darci Hill, or to the Special Session Coordinator, Reina Shay Broussard. Notifications of acceptance will be delivered by December 15, 2015.

Papers on Language and Literature: Call for Special Issue Proposals

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:10am
PLL: Papers on Language and Literature

Papers on Language and Literature is seeking proposals for special issues on subjects including but not limited to

Digital Humanities

Film

Literary Translation

Print Culture

PLL is a generalist publication that is committed to publishing work on a variety of literatures, languages, and chronological periods. We accept proposals year-round. We are a quarterly and expect to publish a special issue once a year, every year. The specific volume and issue will be determined later, depending on the editors' schedule.

[UPDATE] - Deadline Extended - OCTAVIA E. BUTLER: CELEBRATING LETTERS, LIFE, and LEGACY - February 26-28, 2016

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 10:17am
Octavia E. Butler Society

February 24, 2016 will mark the tenth anniversary of the passing of Octavia E. Butler. To commemorate her contributions to the world of letters, the Octavia E. Butler Society solicits papers for a special conference to be hosted by Spelman College February 26-28, 2016. The Society welcomes proposals of 250 words focused on any aspect of Butler's life, work, and influence. Because a major goal of the Society is to encourage the teaching of her works in the academy and beyond, we also invite submissions addressing approaches to teaching Butler in any pedagogical environment. Panel proposals are also encouraged.

The (Native) American University (9/30/15)

updated: 
Sunday, September 20, 2015 - 12:18pm
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

The colonial appropriation of indigenous place names has been an abiding concern of postcolonial studies. The severing of names from their semantic, grammatical, and linguistic ties within the native language and their re-contextualization within the language of the settler creates, in a variety of ways for both colonizer and colonized, a gap between the experience and meaning of a place and the name used to describe it, complicating the colonial boundary.

The Teaching of Literature across Two-Year and Four-Year Colleges: Comparative Perspectives @ACLA, Mar 17-20, 2016, Cambridge MA

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2015 - 1:41pm
American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) 2016

Organizer: Dominique Zino, LaGuardia Community College (CUNY)

This seminar seeks to bring into conversation a range of faculty – tenured and tenure-track professors, adjunct lecturers, and graduate students – teaching at two-year and four-year institutions.

We will aim to discuss the following pedagogical questions: What ways of reading, writing, and thinking should students be introduced to in their first two years of college, especially if they plan to study literature at a four-year college or university? What do we value most as teachers of literature? What concepts, skills, or texts do we find most fundamental to helping students to read literature deeply and to apply it to other realms of learning?

Touching the Body in Pieces: Affective Ecologies of the Modern Body (NeMLA- March 2016, Hartford, CT) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2015 - 8:44am
North East Modern Language Association

From artist Hans Bellmer's distorted dolls, to Rupert Brooke's "dust" in a "corner of a foreign field," to Virginia Woolf's "orts, scraps, and fragments," bodies – textual, phenomenological, cultural, political, and physical – seem to fall to pieces in modernism. How can we conceptualize the modern body in light of its affective and ecological surrounds?

The Wenshan Review (ISSN: 2077-1218): Launch of its new website & call for submissions

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2015 - 7:01am
The Wenshan Review of Literature and Culture

The Wenshan Review of Literature and Culture, issued both in print and online versions, is excited to announce the launch of its new website: www.wreview.org . Authors are warmly invited to submit articles and book reviews via "Online Submissions." Also, the call remains open for submissions to the special issue on Affective Perspectives from East Asia (which can be found in News). Members of the editorial board are based at top universities in the UK, US, and East Asia and cover almost all research areas of literary and cultural studies. Normally, reviews of articles are completed in 3 months.

Contact Email:
wsreview@nccu.edu.tw

[UPDATE] ACLA 2016, Harvard: Images of Science in Literature

updated: 
Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 7:59pm
Catalina Florina Florescu, Pace University

This seminar investigates the views man has expressed about the impact of technology and science across recorded history. Questions that might be addressed include: What is the relationship between religion and technology? Has man always viewed technological innovations as positive? What relationship is there between man's vision of utopian society and technology? The seminar promotes awareness of the importance of literature in creating and maintaining the social, political, ethical and religious systems by which we live. The seminar also considers how humans have discussed the impact of technology and science on society. Suggested primary works may include, but are not limited to, T. More's Utopia; A.Huxley's Brave New World; H.

Secularization and the Novel, a Seminar for ACLA 2016 at Harvard, March 17-20 - Proposals Due Sept 23rd [UPDATE]

updated: 
Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 6:31pm
American Comparative Literature Association

The history of the novel is also, it would appear, a history of secularization. For Ian Watt, Michael McKeon, Franco Moretti, and many others, the novel is a product of what Max Weber called rationalization. More recently, in Martha Nussbaum's _Love's Knowledge_ and Lynn Hunt's _Inventing Human Rights_, the novel is seen as participating in the production of secular modernity—-through the elaboration of modernity's ethics and the encouragement of empathy across socio-economic boundaries, respectively. How then should we characterize the relationship between the novel and secularization? Is the novel an effect or a cause of secularization? Or, if the relationship between the two is more dialectical, how should that dialectic be described?

Pages