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JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 5:21am
JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

JOSAAC AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON, ASSAM (ISSN 2348-0602) invites article submissions by for its January' 2016 Issue. The journal is a peer-reviewed and published annually and publishes research base articles on various subjects of Arts, Science and Commerce.
1. The contributions should be original and not published earlier or submitted elsewhere for publication simultaneously.
2. The paper should be typed in MS Word in A4 size paper, times new roman font, 12 point font size in the text and all heading should be 14 font size bold with 1.5 line spacing.

Between Vulnerability and Resilience: Representations of the Veil in Literature, Film, and Fine Arts

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 11:32pm
Umme Al-wazedi and Afrin Zeenat

The veil's ancient and modern history and its resurgence in our time is an important subject for discussion for those of us posing new questions about women and Islam in literature, film, and fine arts. In Europe and the U.S., the veil is often presented through errors of conceptualizations. The frequent and numerous discussions on the veil's role and function prove that the media, in particular, seems to be obsessed with it. Recurrently, these discussions run along essentialist and ahistorical lines associating Islam with the ideology of shame and honor. Moreover, the Muslim immigrant "problem" in Europe and the U.S. and the fear of Islam and Muslims in connection with terrorism has heightened the controversy on the issue of the veil.

Craft Critique Culture: Bridging Divides (April 8-9, 2016: Iowa City, Iowa)

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:47pm
Kate Nesbit / Lydia Maunz-Breese / Heidi Renée Aijala (University of Iowa)

16th Annual Craft Critique Culture Graduate Conference
April 8-9, 2016
Bridging Divides
University of Iowa

CRAFT CRITIQUE CULTURE is an interdisciplinary conference focusing on the intersections of critical and creative approaches to writing both within and beyond the academy. This year's conference will encourage an examination of the "inter" of interdisciplinary—as well as the construction and deconstruction of boundaries between and within academic, public, private, personal, critical, and creative discourses—through an inquiry into bridging divides.

Violence in Contemporary European Cinema--ACLA 2016

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:02pm
Kingsborough CC

This seminar seeks to examine the representation of violence, in its public and private manifestations, in contemporary European cinema. Brutality, cruelty, and aggressiveness permeate not only the lives of victims of war (as in Grbavica [2006], Caché [2005], etc.), of totalitarian regimes (4 luni, 3 saptamani si 2 zile [2007], etc.), or of crime syndicates (Gomorrah [2008], etc.), but also that of the ordinary individual confronted with racial and ethnic injustice, poverty, or familial conflict (Gegen die Wand [2004], Lilja 4-ever [2004], L'enfant [2005], Entre les murs [2008], Fish Tank [2009], La Pianiste [2001], Pozitia copilului [2013], Leviafan [2014], Urok [2014], etc.).

[Update] Chronicles and Grimoires: The Occult as Political Commentary

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 4:37pm
Medieval Assoc. of the Midwest: ICMS Kalamazoo 2016.

Whether seen in signs and portents, or read in grimoires or magic books, the occult in the premodern world is both marveled at and feared. A significant amount of the description of occult and sorcerous activity, however, also functions as political commentary, whether as direct criticism of secular current events or as a voice or conceptual space for the spiritual "other" in medieval society.

Gastronomy, Culture, and the Arts: A Scholarly Exchange of Epic Portions (March 12-13, 2016), University of Toronto Mississauga

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 12:42pm
Gastro Conference, Department of Language Studies

"Foodies consider food to be an art, on a level with painting or drama" (The Official Foodie Handbook, Paul Levy, Ann Barr, 1984).

From the kitchen to the classroom, the preeminence of food has brought gastronomy to the forefront of mainstream culture as well as academic conversation. Devoid of the irony that may have once infused the Handbook statement, food is, and has always been, indeed 'an art, on a level with painting or drama.'

We invite abstracts from all academic disciplines that address the following themes or other related areas:

Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, September 6, 2015 - 1:11pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

Queer Theory in French DUE 09/30

updated: 
Sunday, September 6, 2015 - 1:03pm
NeMLA

47th Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
17 March - 20 March 2016

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Sept. 30, 2015

UPDATE: Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Sunday, September 6, 2015 - 7:26am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

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