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[UPDATE - Deadline 01/09/2015] Reading Risk in Contemporary U.S. Fiction and Culture

Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 4:56am
A Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Colloquium, University of Birminham

Five days after 9/11, Republican Party activist James Pinkerton proclaimed that 'the World Trade Center has been destroyed, but this has also been a crushing defeat for irony, cynicism and hipness. Here in New York, the city that gave the world Seinfeld, Sex and the City and Studio 54, the victors now are sincerity, patriotism and earnestness' (Newsday, September 16th, 2001). Has Pinkerton's claim come true? If traditional values like sincerity, patriotism and earnestness are ascendant, what space is left for texts that risk to contest or query the status-quo? Should we abhor risk as the cause of the financial crash, or pine for risky artistic practices that might instigate change? Do we need the texts we study to be risky?

CFP: Native American Literature (47th Annual CEA Conference, March 31-April 2, 2016, Denver, CO)

Friday, August 21, 2015 - 3:29pm
Benjamin Carson / Bridgewater State University

Call for Papers, CEA 2016

Conference Theme: creation

47th Annual Conference | March 31-April 2, 2016 | Denver, CO

Native American Literature Panel(s)

This year's conference theme is particularly relevant to Native American/Indigenous/First Nations peoples. While all topics related to Indigenous literatures will be considered, including Indigenous poetics, Indigenous rhetorics, as well as issues of sovereignty, separatism, and transnationalism, papers that address the conference theme will be especially welcome.

Proposals will be accepted online at beginning August 15,

Submission deadline: November 1, 2015

[UPDATE] Southern Studies Conference 5-6 Feb. 2016

Friday, August 21, 2015 - 9:59am
Auburn University at Montgomery

Now in its eighth year, the AUM Southern Studies Conference invites panel and paper proposals on any aspect of Southern literature. The conference will be held 5-6 February 2016. Topics may include but are not limited to:

Fictional Religions (ACLA 2015)

Friday, August 21, 2015 - 9:31am
American Comparative Literature Association

Fantasy, science fiction, horror, and even more mimetic fiction in various media such as texts and graphic novels have long permitted the sort of free experimentation often celebrated (or bemoaned) in the American religious environment, though constrained by genre conventions, social contexts, market forces, and other factors. Thus, especially the "estranged" genres of fiction (pace Suvin) permit not only the utopian depiction of traditional religions as they ought to be and the dystopian depiction of religions as they ought not to be, but also the representation of novel religious forms—a space in which new fictional religions may be invented.

Connections: The Threads, Roots, and Pathways That Bind Us

Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 5:49pm
New Voices Graduate Student Conference

The New Voices Planning Committee is proud to announce that we are now accepting proposals for the 2016 New Voices Conference. This year's annual conference will be held February 4-6, 2016, at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and will feature papers, panels, workshops, creative writing readings, and a poster session.

[UPDATE]: Consuming and Consumption (Columbia, SC): abstract due October 20, 2015

Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 2:11pm
Association of Carolina Emerging Scholars

Consumption sustains and undermines modern life, from popular culture to our most privileged art. The Association of Carolina Emerging Scholars is seeking abstracts that address consumption in any of its many forms, including but not limited to the following: eating, buying, obsession, the reception of media, and the status-seeking public use of resources first called "conspicuous consumption" by Thorstein Veblen in 1899.

Edited anthology of Conjure, Hoodoo and Voodoo in African-American Literature

Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 11:03am
James Mellis/ William Paterson University

Articles are sought for a collection of essays on representations of Conjure, Hoodoo and Voodoo in African-American literature. This collection seeks to explore how African-American writers have used, referenced, engaged and disengaged with Conjure, Hoodoo and Voodoo in their writing through various cultural and historical movements.