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call for journal articles/book reviews

updated: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 5:33am
Çankaya University Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (http://cujhss.cankaya.edu.tr/index_en.php)

Çankaya University Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, a refereed international academic journal, published twice yearly in May and November, is currently seeking articles/book reviews for future issues.
We welcome articles/research notes from various branches of the humanities and social sciences.
Book reviews between 1500 and 2000 words must be academic in nature, giving information about the work's significance and contextualizing it to highlight its strengths and weaknesses without criticizing the author.
Authors may refer to the journal webpage for further information:
http://cujhss.cankaya.edu.tr/index_en.php

Wreck Park Journal is Accepting Essays and Reviews for Winter Issue [UPDATE]

updated: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 12:32am
Wreck Park Journal

Wreck Park is a double-blind, peer reviewed publication run out of Binghamton, New York. The journal publishes prose, poetry, criticism, and interviews, and is particularly interested in conceptual frameworks and developments that set to disrupt canonical and standardized discourses of the contemporary academic and literary landscapes. Wreck Park is a member of the Council of Editors of Learned Journals and welcomes authors, poets, researchers, and thinkers whose work reflects an interrogation of engendered norms and traditions within societies, cultures, intellectual circles, and beyond.

[UPDATE] Abstract Deadline Extended: 11/15/15 21st Southwest English Symposium

updated: 
Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - 9:16pm
Southwest English Symposium

Date: February 20th, 2015

Theme: Objects & Commodities

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Ian Bogost, Ivan Allen College Distinguished Chair in Media Studies and Professor of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology

We are excited to close out this year's symposium with a poetry reading at a local pub! Attendees are also invited to share their works there, please check out our website or contact us at swes.asu@gmail.com for more information. There will also be a social on Friday

[UPDATE] Boundaries and Intersections: Space, Time, Discipline (MadLit) – Proposals by 12/18/15; Conference 2/25/16-2/27/16

updated: 
Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - 6:37pm
UW-Madison MadLit Graduate Student Conference

Boundaries and intersections -- two contrasting metaphors and yet not quite a binary. On the one hand, these words spatially remind us of Venn diagrams: two bound circles with a space of intersection where they overlap. On the other hand, intersections can be places of traffic, movement over time, streams of cars or pedestrians crossing boundaries. Spatial overlap or temporal crossing--the stability of categories or their rupture. The humanities are constantly defined and redefined by the churning of boundaries and intersections.

Folk and Indigenous Religions in American Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - 4:11pm
American Religion and Literature Society

The American Religion and Literature Society, affiliated with the American Literature Association, invites papers exploring how folk and indigenous religious traditions serve to unsettle or redefine conventional assumptions about religion's engagement with literature, about the secularity of American literature, or about the way literary scholarship traditionally delineates disciplinary boundaries between American literature and world literature. We welcome studies pertaining to all indigenous and folk religious traditions, broadly defined, and from all theoretical perspectives.

Please submit a 500-word abstract by January 4, 2016 to Ray Horton at rlh137@case.edu. Electronic submissions only.

The Invisible Bear, Volume Two; deadline: December 1, 2015

updated: 
Monday, November 9, 2015 - 10:14pm
The Invisible Bear

Our call for submissions is now OPEN. We are currently accepting visual art and poetry submissions for our next issue from September, 18, 2015 to December 1st, 2015.

Submission Guidelines:

Poetry

Send 3-5 poems to thebearinvisible [at] gmail [dot] com in a .doc, .docx, or .pdf in an attachment. Do not include any identifying information on your submission. In the subject line of your e-mail, include your full author name and the type of submission. Example: "Frank O'Hara, Poetry." All submissions are blind read by three, independent readers. Including a bio with your submission is not necessary, but you will be requested for a short bio if your piece is selected. Please do not include your submission in the body of the e-mail.

The Imaginary -Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference (3/4/16-3/5/16; abstracts due 12/21/15)

updated: 
Monday, November 9, 2015 - 6:24pm
Northeastern University English Graduate Student Association

"The imaginary" invokes spectres, memories, what is sensed, felt, and wanted, the fanciful, visionary, shadowy, illusory, what is not visible or legible, a past and a future we can not perceive.

For Lacan, the imaginary is the beginning: "I began with the Imaginary, I then had to chew on the story of the Symbolic ... and I finished by putting out for you this famous Real." For sociologist John B.Thompson, the social imaginary is "the creative and symbolic dimension of the social world, the
dimension through which human beings create their ways of living together and their ways of representing their collective life."

Metaphor: Retrospect and Prospects - May 20th - May 22nd 2016

updated: 
Monday, November 9, 2015 - 6:21am
Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Genoa

The so-called "Cognitive Revolution" brought with it, among other features, Cognitive or Conceptual Metaphor (CM) (Reddy, Lakoff and Johnson), refining and expanding theories of comparison and property attribution. In the period 1970-1990 circa, CM gradually came to dominate the metaphor scene, consolidating its position in the twenty years that followed, also bolstered by relevance theory and Gricean pragmatics. Naturally, there were "offshoots" and complementary strands - developments such as blending theory − which enriched the scene. Unsurprisingly, inadequacies were also identified and "alternatives" or "integrations", such as perceptual simulation (Gibbs, Barsalou), framing (Schoen, Reddy) offered.

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