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Re-transcribing Hindu religion; locating gender in the literature of the Upanishads and the Vedas.

updated: 
Friday, July 31, 2015 - 4:08am
Tapati Bharadwaj

Re-transcribing Hindu religion; locating gender in the literature of the Upanishads and the Vedas.

This is a call for papers for a collection that will construe Hindu religious texts as literature, and examine them within a gendered analytical framework. What prevents us from examining the Upanishadic or the Vedic texts within a literary or a gendered perspective? If the basis of religion is "revealed knowledge," which was made evident to men – then is it not obvious that these notions of the Absolute Being would but be defined within gender inflected terminologies?

Let me explain with an example from an Upanishad. In the Aitareya Upanishad, the first stanza reads in the following manner:

Experimentations in the Postcolonial Novel: Writing and Re-writing Gender Panel

updated: 
Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 8:12pm
NeMLA 2016

Experimentations in the Postcolonial Novel: Writing and Re-writing Gender Panel (9/30/2015; 3/17-3/20 2016) NeMLA Hartford, CT

Experimentations in the Postcolonial Novel: Writing and Re-writing Gender Panel
Chair: Tara Harney-Mahajan

47th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 17-20, 2016; Hartford, CT
Host Institution: University of Connecticut

[Deadline extended 1 week] Beauty and Belief (deadline for abstracts: August 7; conference: November 5-6, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 4:54pm
Literature and Belief, a semiannual publication of the Office for the Study of Christian Values in Literature, Brigham Young University

The conference will include a wide variety of sessions and topics on possible connections among (and tension between) literature, aesthetics, theory, and belief, broadly defined. Sessions will include—but not limited to—

•Creative writers discussing connections among (or possible conflicts between) aesthetics and faith in either their own work or the work of others.

•The analysis of literary texts or cultural artifacts that in some way explore or embody one or more aspects of religious belief or practice, broadly defined.

Special Issue: Christianity in Contemporary Native America (Sept. 30, 2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 5:04pm
Editors: Kimberly G. Wieser (University of Oklahoma), Rachel R. Luckenbill (Duquesne University)

Contemporary perspectives on Christianity's role in American Indian communities are diverse and often ambiguous, partly due to this religion's involvement in colonization. While some grassroots traditionalists and many in the activist and academic communities frequently reject Christianity for its role in dismantling American Indian traditions and identities, the past is complex, and the American Indian Christian community is strong and growing. The last two decades have seen its resurgence. Recent works such as Mona Susan Power's Sacred Wilderness Sterlin Harjo's This May Be the Last Time, and The Cherokee Hymnbook: New Edition for Everyone reflect ongoing practices of Christianity in Indian Country today.

The Bible and 19th-Century American Women Writers (NeMLA, March 17-20, 2016 Connecticut)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 8:48am
Amy Easton-Flake/Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

Direct references and allusions to Christianity or the Bible are an integral part of much 19th-century literature. This panel takes seriously this oft-neglected aspect of women's writing. Papers will likely explore questions such as how did women use Biblical allusions to advance stories or causes, how did they make scriptures relevant to contemporary society, or how did they use literature to comment on and take part in shaping religious doctrines and practices. Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words through the NeMLA site https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/User/SessionManage/15609 by September 30, 2015.

Dealing with the Dead: Mortality and Community in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

updated: 
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 - 11:55am
Thea Tomaini, Explorations in Medieval Culture Series, Brill Publishers

Call for Papers

Dealing With The Dead: Mortality and Community in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Call for abstracts for chapters to be included in an upcoming volume on Death and culture in Medieval and Early Modern art, history, and culture.

CFP: Love and the Word, Melbourne, 7th-9th December 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 - 7:35am
Australasian Universities Languages and Literature Association (AULLA)

Love & the Word - AULLA Conference 2016

DEADLINE: Monday the 29th February 2016

Hosted by Victoria University, the Australasian Universities Languages & Literature Association Conference will be held in Melbourne, Australia from 7th-9th December 2016.

The conference theme draws on AULLA's origins as an association of scholars working in fields of philology. Thus we examine both philos (love) and logos (word). How does affection affect words? What do people mean by 'love' and its counterparts in the world's languages? Or perhaps: how does it 'do' those meanings?

Women's Words: Female Instruction in the Medieval British Isles, Kalamazoo 2016, May 16th-20th

updated: 
Monday, July 27, 2015 - 11:25am
International Congress on Medieval Studies Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

We invite you to participate in our session "Women's Words: Female Instruction in the Medieval British Isles" at the 2016 meeting of the International Congress of Medieval Studies, May 12 – 16, Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI.

Our session invites papers which explore the relationship between teaching texts and learning women in conjunction with the language, locations, and spaces of female education. Submissions may include discussions of vernacular and Latin learning, spiritual and non-religious feminine instruction, the iconography and depiction of female learning, and the presentation and exchange of educational materials in a manuscript culture.

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