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Women's Words: Female Instruction in the Medieval British Isles, Kalamazoo 2016, May 16th-20th

updated: 
Monday, July 27, 2015 - 11:25am
International Congress on Medieval Studies Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

We invite you to participate in our session "Women's Words: Female Instruction in the Medieval British Isles" at the 2016 meeting of the International Congress of Medieval Studies, May 12 – 16, Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI.

Our session invites papers which explore the relationship between teaching texts and learning women in conjunction with the language, locations, and spaces of female education. Submissions may include discussions of vernacular and Latin learning, spiritual and non-religious feminine instruction, the iconography and depiction of female learning, and the presentation and exchange of educational materials in a manuscript culture.

Women's Words: Female Instruction in the Medieval British Isles, May 12¬-15, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, July 26, 2015 - 11:30am
International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

We invite you to participate in our session "Women's Words: Female Instruction in the Medieval British Isles" at the 2016 meeting of the International Congress of Medieval Studies, May 12 – 16, Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI.

Our session invites papers which explore the relationship between teaching texts and learning women in conjunction with the language, locations, and spaces of female education. Submissions may include discussions of vernacular and Latin learning, spiritual and non-religious feminine instruction, the iconography and depiction of female learning, and the presentation and exchange of educational materials in a manuscript culture.

Submission Call : The Sunflower Collective

updated: 
Sunday, July 26, 2015 - 6:21am
The Sunflower Collective

The Sunflower Collective is looking for submissions. We celebrate the personal and the political - which we believe to be one and the same thing - in art.

We would like to mention at the outset that we are not interested in art that does not take risks. We do not mind if you have a degree but we are unlikely to be impressed by it. Nor do we care which journals have published your work before. All we are interested in is something that sings for itself without any props, something that grabs us by our throat and refuses to let go, something that shakes us out of our complacent stupor. Give us something hungry, not bellyful; something beat, if you get our drift.

Call for Essay Proposal for Volume on Teaching Young Adult Literature (1 November 2015)

updated: 
Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 2:49pm
MLA Publications

Proposals are invited for a volume entitled Teaching Young Adult Literature to be edited by Karen Coats, Mike Cadden, and Roberta Seelinger Trites. This volume in the MLA's Options for Teaching series aims to bring together a range of articles describing innovative and successful approaches to designing and teaching stand-alone Young Adult Literature courses at the post-secondary level, as well as incorporating YA texts into other undergraduate and graduate courses relevant to MLA members and Education and Library Science faculty.

Eleventh Native America Symposium, November 5-6, Durant, Oklahoma, Keynote Speaker Richard Green

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 7:21pm
Southeastern Oklahoma State University

The Eleventh Native American Symposium will held on November 5-6, 2015 at Southeastern Oklahoma State University. Papers, presentations, panels, creative projects, and films addressing all aspects of Native American life and studies are welcome, including but not limited to archaeology, history, literature, law, medicine, education, religion, politics, social science, and the fine arts. The keynote speaker will be Richard Green, tribal historian for the Chickasaw Nation. All papers presented at the symposium will be eligible for inclusion in a volume of published proceedings, which will also be posted on our website at http://homepages.se.edu/nas/.

UPDATE: Extended Deadline: Monstrous Messengers 17 Aug. 2015

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 4:45pm
Leslie Ormandy

For this collection, three more papers from any discipline are welcome; however, advantaged are those focusing on a gendered or religious moral message. And I am looking for ONE paper which is willing to argue that the monsters represented are simply that, monsters, and that utilizing them as a tool toward acceptance of diversity is not a good thing. The latter is, I understand, a controversial view. This book wishes to explore all views and not promote one view by excluding another.

What Devils Say

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 4:34pm
Texas Medieval Association (TEMA): International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan: May 12-15, 2016

Devils are everywhere in medieval literature, disturbing, challenging, and violating conventional spatio-temporal constraints as they move freely between worlds in order to torment the holy, spread disease, and tempt good Christians by making sin seem sweet. They appear as enchanters, tempters, playful tricksters, masked tormentors, terrifying beasts, mankind's lawyerly accusers, and on occasion, as sympathetic figures who happened to be on the losing side of a cosmic war. Although much has been written about how devils are staged, their appearance, and their interaction with those they torment, very little has been written about what devils actually say. How do devils represent themselves and their spaces of punishment?

'Hit iseie aboc iwrite': Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century Vernacular Devotional Manuscripts (Kzoo 2016--deadline Sept. 15, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 1:25pm
Early Middle English Society

The Early Middle English Society invites paper proposals for our session, "'Hit iseie aboc iwrite': Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century Vernacular Devotional Manuscripts," at the 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo, 12-15 May 2016. Vernacular texts of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries in England often fall in the gap between the two major fields of literary study, Old English and Middle English. While these texts have begun to receive the scholarly attention they deserve, religious and devotional texts are too often marginalized as not "literary."

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