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Playing With Source Materials: Alterations and Shakespeare's Creative Fabric -- NeMLA 2018

updated: 
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 12:25pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Shakespeare is preeminent among English authors, but, by today's standards, for all of his fame, little is known about Shakespeare the man. This has lead some to create an authorship controversy, though among scholars this is a non-issue as there is ample evidence linking "the man from Stratford" to the London playwright. Stylometry studies have found that Shakespeare and his fellow playwrights collaborated much more than had ever been guessed at, but such findings shed little light on his creative processes. Perhaps the best currently available avenue to gain insight into his creative strategies is by examining what at first glance appears to indicate lack of creativity—his inveterate unabashed "borrowing" of plots, characters, phrases, and more.

Food and Feast in Premodern Outlaw Tales (edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:41am
Editors: Melissa Ridley Elmes and Kristin Bovaird-Abbo
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

We seek papers to round out an exciting collection of essays on the subject of “food and feast in premodern outlaw tales.” Although we are happy to consider abstracts on Middle English outlaws, we are especially interested in work that considers topics related to food and/or feasting in the following areas: pre-Conquest English, medieval Scandinavian, medieval continental, or early modern outlaws in history, literature, and/or culture. We welcome essays from any discipline. Please send an author bio and abstract for a 6,000-8,000 word essay to Melissa Ridley Elmes at MElmes@lindenwood.edu by August 1, 2017.

Milton (SAMLA 89, Atlanta, November 3-5, 2017)

updated: 
Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 6:08pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 21, 2017

This panel welcomes scholarly papers on any subject pertaining to John Milton. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme, “High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture,” are especially welcome. Potential topics include Milton and popular culture, Milton in performance, Milton’s prose as high or low art, Milton and multimedia or digital humanities, artistic renderings of Milton or his works, and musical or literary reinterpretations. By June 21, please submit a 250-word abstract, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dr. Matt Dolloff, Georgia State University, at mdolloff@gsu.edu or Dr. Olin Bjork, University of Houston – Downtown, at bjorko@uhd.edu.

Landscapes of Emotions in Italian Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:21pm
NeMLA April 12-15, 2018, Pittsburgh (PA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

In light of expanding literary theories contributing to a better understanding of emotions and affects in literary texts, this panel will provide participants with an opportunity to discuss various new and important perspectives on the representation of emotions in Italian literature and art.

Proposals that analyze early modern through contemporary Italian literary production are welcome. We seek papers exploring the manner in which writers convey emotions to their readers, to the literary community of their day and, to their society at large.

Terra Digita: Digital Humanities Approaches to Medieval Mapping

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:32pm
Cornell University Library
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 15, 2017

Call for Papers and Workshops

 

Terra Digita:

Digital Humanities Approaches to Medieval Mapping

 

Cornell University

November 4-5

 

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Performing The Early Modern English Woman (1500-1710): Seeing and Being Seen on the Domestic, Civic, and Dramatic Stage.

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:36pm
PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

or Early Modern Women, the very act of seeing or being seeing was fraught. Whether in their domestic roles or later as they first appeared on English stages, much was talked about the gaze of the early modern woman and the sway she held over others' gazes. Whether she was catching the eye of a potential lover or looking longingly after her children, her freedom, her future, the language of sight surrounds these women. This panel will look for papers exploring the theatrical power within these depictions of women seeing and being seen. The performative nature of being a woman who must appear chaste while remaining sexually desirable.

CFP: Performing the Early Modern English Woman (1500-1700) for PAMLA Conference 2017 Honolulu, Hawaii (11/10-12/2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:39pm
Shane Wood, University of California, Irvine
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

Whether in the domestic sphere or on the Early Modern Stage, the performance of seeing and being seen is one the surrounds the women of this time. This panel seeks explorations of the performativity of women seeing and being seen in their time and context. Papers that specifically marry the themes of female performance and sight are most welcome.

Individual paper presentations will be between 15 and 20 minutes long. Please submit proposals via the online system by June 26, 2017. The PAMLA 2017 Conference will be held at the lovely Chaminade University of Honolulu (with the official conference hotel being the Ala Moana) from Friday, November 10 to Sunday, November 12.

Paper proposals must be made via our online system found here:

CFP: The Visibility of Knowledge: Spanish Culture at the Council of Trent for PAMLA Conference 2017 Honolulu, Hawaii (11/10-12/2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:40pm
Marta Albalá Pelegrín, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

The council of Trent marked a milestone for Spanish diplomats and Churchmen. What has been often perceived as a change of paradigm in the theological and political protocols, was also a site for the creation of knowledge. As Spanish diplomats and churchmen gathered at Trent with their pairs from all the continent, medical, literary and philosophical ideas traveled hundreds of miles across borders and seas -- in the form of adaptations from antiquity, illustrated codices from the New World or revolutionary texts. This panel aims at examining the ways in which the council fostered early modern science and the liberal arts. 

NeMLA 2018: (Im)possible Bodies: Spaces and the Body in Early Modern Europe

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:59pm
Stephanie Shiflett (BU) and Ashley M. Voeks (UT Austin)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

This panel explores the spatial limits of bodies in early modern Europe. The spatial limits of bodies, broadly conceived, refer to the determinant role that real or abstract boundaries play on the physical and/or imagined body. These limits can take many forms, including aesthetic conventions, battlefields, domestic confines, geographic boundaries, and religious sites. Notions of the body may be equally diverse, extending to animals, communities, environments, and genders. Panel discussion will provide a rich examination of intersections between spatial perspectives and studies of early modern bodies.

 

Imagining Other Worlds: Setting in Early Modern English Drama

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:41pm
Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Every play imagines its own world—but the worlds they imagine must in some way connect with their audience. This panel invites perspectives on early modern English drama that considers the balance between these two poles: the imagined world of the setting and its connection to the surrounding culture in early modern England. This balance is particularly important in early modern English drama for both historical reasons—an increased awareness of other worlds and their different reality within the expanding cultural purview of the early modern English—and literary ones—since so much criticism of these plays has focused on their relation to early modern England itself to the exclusion of their frequently quite disparate settings.

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