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A Woman Well Reputed? Porcia/Portia from Antiquity to the Renaissance

updated: 
Monday, May 23, 2016 - 9:08am
full name / name of organization: 
Renaissance Society of America
deadline: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Cato’s daughter; Brutus’ wife.  This panel will consider the figure of Porcia in the Renaissance, where she is to be found in a wide range of cultures and genres.  From the earliest accounts, Porcia has been something of a a paradox: heroic and vulnerable; the masculine soul who is also the devoted wife.   No woman in history can have passed into legend more closely defined by her menfolk; let’s give her some room of her own.

 

Topics might include, but are certainly not limited to:

 

National traditions (eg. Spanish lyrical Porcias; French tragic Porcias)

Exemplary Porcias

Porcia in the visual arts

Female suicide: strength or weakness?

Gender transgression

The Medieval “Freak Show”: Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 11:27am
full name / name of organization: 
MEARCSTAPA
contact email: 
deadline: 
Monday, May 30, 2016

SEMA 2016 Proposal

 

Call for Papers for SEMA 2016

The Medieval “Freak Show”: Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages

 

People and creatures perceived as monstrous or wondrous are often put on display for profit or exploitation. At times, this exhibitionism presents itself as “education.” What has popularly been called the “freak show” achieved its height via the emergence of working class entertainments that transformed visual cultures in the nineteenth century, as exemplified in P.T. Barnum’s circus and its sideshows, but also including innovations such as the stereoscope and the panorama, which prepared the rise of cinema and, later, television.

English and Italian Hybridity

updated: 
Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 11:27am
full name / name of organization: 
Michael Saenger / Sergio Costola
deadline: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016

English and Italian Hybridity

CFP for Renaissance Society of America, March 30-April 1, 2017, Chicago, IL.

ANAFORA journal – Call for Papers

updated: 
Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 11:26am
full name / name of organization: 
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Osijek
contact email: 
deadline: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Anafora, an international journal published by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Osijek, invites contributions for the upcoming volume. 

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Spenser's Jargon

updated: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 3:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Renaissance Society of America (International Spenser Society)
deadline: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

DEADLINE EXTENDED

Spenser at RSA 2017: Spenser's Jargon

Sponsored by the International Spenser Society

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Spenser's Sustaining Fictions

updated: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 3:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Renaissance Society of America (International Spenser Society)
deadline: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

DEADLINE EXTENDED

Spenser at RSA 2017: Spenser's Sustaining Fictions

Sponsored by the International Spenser Society

 

UVA-Wise Medieval/Renaissance, Sept. 15-17, 2016 (Undergrad) (proposals by July 15, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:57am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Virginia's College at Wise
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

The University of Virginia's College at Wise’s Medieval-Renaissance Conference is pleased to accept abstracts for our thirtieth conference.  The conference is an open event that promotes scholarly discussion in all disciplines of Medieval and Renaissance studies.  Papers by undergraduates covering any area of medieval and renaissance studies—including literature, language, history, philosophy, science, pedagogy, and the arts—are welcome.  Abstracts for papers should be around 300 words in length and should be accompanied by a brief letter of recommendation from a faculty sponsor (the latter can be mailed or emailed separately).  A branch campus of the University of Virginia, the University of Virginia’s College at Wise is a public four-year liberal arts c

Shakespeare's Ashes

updated: 
Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:53am
full name / name of organization: 
Supriya Chaudhuri/ Shakespeare Society of India
deadline: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

Shakespeare’s Ashes

An International Conference, organized by the Shakespeare Society of India

New Delhi, October 21st-22nd, 2016

 

Witchcraft & Catholicism in the Early Modern Period

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:11am
full name / name of organization: 
Rocky Mountain Medieval & Renaissance Association at the RSA
contact email: 
deadline: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

This panel seeks proposals which address works (artistic, literary, historical, etc.) at the intersection of Catholicism and witchcraft (demons, devils, witches, magic, etc.) between 1500 and 1700 in England and/or Continental Europe. Of particular interest are works which link witchcraft and Catholicism; critique governmental or religious responses to witchcraft and/or Catholicism; and/or representations in literature or drama which compare witchcraft and/or Catholicism.

“I do love these ancient ruins”-- Ruinophilia in Early Modern Literature and Culture / RSA 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Margaret Owens, Nipissing University
contact email: 
deadline: 
Saturday, May 28, 2016

 

Ruinophilia, Ruin Porn, Ruin Lust – the roots of post-modernity’s recent enthralment with ruins are often traced back to the eighteenth-century cult of the sublime. However, Antonio’s remark, “I do love these ancient ruins,” in John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi, suggests that versions of ruinophilia were very much alive in the early seventeenth century. This proposed panel for the Renaissance Society of America conference (30 March-1 April 2017 in Chicago) seeks papers that explore the fascination with ruins in sixteenth and seventeenth-century literary and cultural venues.  

 

The Ancient Novel in the Renaissance RSA 2017 Chicago

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
contact email: 
deadline: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

 Though many modern scholars place the invention of the novel in the 18th century, the genre arose much earlier. Early Modern works such as those by Sidney, Rabelais, and Cervantes may be classified as novels. However, the genre has its origins in the ancient Greek and Roman novels of the second and third centuries. While these works are often forgotten in the present day, they were translated during the Renaissance and were among the most widely read texts of the Early Modern period. Their popularity stemmed from their content and their structures, as they synthesized and examined several genres in a single prose work. As a result, echoes of the ancient novel are present in Renaissance romance, satire, poetry, and theatre.

Forms of Imperfection in the English Renaissance (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Andrew Carlson, Thomas Fulton / Rutgers University
deadline: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

While early modern writers sought “the perfect perfection of poesy” (to borrow the words of William Webbe), forms of imperfection have become central to our understanding of the period and its literary accomplishments. Scholars have lately looked to categories such as eccentricity, errancy, and incoherence as they have tried to understand the rise of English vernacular eloquence and the distinction of poetic making over the course of the early modern period.

Unreasonable, Speculative, Fantastic: Women’s Parapolitical Creativity During the English Civil Wars (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Jantina Ellens, McMaster University; Chantelle Thauvette, Siena College
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, May 20, 2016

This panel proposes to explore English Civil War writing outside of its traditionally historical and male-focused frames. Research by Diane Purkiss, Mihoko Suzuki, and Susan Wiseman draws attention to gendered ways of understanding history and politics in the literatures of the Civil Wars, but there remain many more “areas of excess and gaps and silences where unreason flourishes” (Purkiss 4) that have yet to be explored.  

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