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[UPDATE] SAMLA 87, 13-15 Nov. 2015--Shared Politics: Political Adaptations, Appropriations, and Influences

Saturday, May 16, 2015 - 5:03pm
Phillip Zapkin

This panel seeks interesting and innovative papers in the field of adaptation studies. As Linda Hutcheon writes in A Theory of Adaptation, adapters "are just as likely to want to contest the aesthetic or political values of the adapted text as to pay homage." Our panelists will explore the political uses to which adaptation is put, considering why and how authors adapt specific texts for political purposes. We will consider the possibilities and limitations of using adaptation as a political tool.

Montaigne in Early Modern England and Scotland

Friday, May 15, 2015 - 7:06pm
Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Durham University, England

Montaigne in Early Modern England and Scotland

Confirmed speakers:

Warren Boutcher (Queen Mary)
Will Hamlin (Washington State)
Katie Murphy (Oxford)
John O'Brien (Durham)
Richard Scholar (Oxford)
David Louis Sedley (Haverford)

Dates: Fri.-Sat. 6-7 Nov. 2015

Sexual Violence on the Early Modern English Stage

Friday, May 15, 2015 - 4:42pm
RSA Boston 2016

This session seeks to explore the representation of sexual violence on the English stage as both a trope and as an articulation of early modern patriarchal systems of authority and governance. From the threatened rape of Mariana in Pericles to Heywood's Rape of Lucrece and Fletcher's Bonduca, sexual violence permeated the London stage. By considering the role of sexual violence within early modern theatrical culture, this session will investigate how anxieties regarding gender norms were literally performed, how individual playwrights resisted, complied with, or complicated prevailing notions of gendered behaviour, and how the threat of sexual violence functioned as a strategy of gendered governance in the period.

RSA 2016 Panel: Receptions of Classical Texts on the Early Modern English Stage

Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 3:54pm
Benjamin Beier / Washburn University

Generations of scholars have worked to uncover the presence of classical sources in early modern English drama. And Shakespeare studies, in particular, has labored to undo the impression that Shakespeare had 'small Latin and less Greek.' Recent work not only has revealed classical antecedents, but also has argued about the function of such sources within plays. This panel seeks papers that add to our understanding of the role of classical texts on the early modern stage. For example, are there instances in which the function of classical texts has been misunderstood by critics? In what ways did early modern playwrights productively misunderstand sources?

In More's Footsteps: Utopia and Science Fiction

Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 7:33am
Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction

Call for Papers
In More's Footsteps: Utopia and Science Fiction
Foundation #124 (summer 2016)

Next year marks the 500th anniversary of Sir Thomas More's seminal work, Utopia. Although the text has been of importance within Renaissance Studies and political philosophy, it has also occupied a special place within science fiction for helping to popularize the notion of 'the Great Good Place' to which society should strive to perfect. Whether directly or indirectly, More's text has been of huge significance for the utopian strand that runs through much science fiction.

Sovereignty and Metaphor, Abstracts due this Friday, May 15

Wednesday, May 13, 2015 - 9:29am
NYU English

September 24-25, 2015

Speakers: Victoria Kahn (UC, Berkeley), Paul Strohm (Columbia), John Rogers (Yale), Kathleen Davis (U of Rhode Island), Brandon Chua (U of Queensland), Jacques Lezra (NYU)

The graduate students of the Department of English and MARC at NYU invite proposals for papers that explore the reciprocity between sovereignty and metaphor in English and continental (Latin and vernacular) writing from the medieval to early modern period.

Comparative Drama Special Issue Deadline 10/1/15

Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 5:39pm
Comparative Drama

Call for Papers: The Actor in the Interval

Comparative Drama will publish a special issue exploring the interval (understood as a space that distinguishes, connects, or performs) between theater and literary studies, with a focus on the actor. We seek submissions that engage both disciplines, either by combining methodologies or by taking the relationship between fields as a subject. Possible topics include (but are not limited to):

Public Intellectuals Lecture Series (Fall 2015)

Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 12:04pm
Carleton University

The Public Intellectuals Lecture Series has just wrapped up a successful spring lineup featuring four fantastic, well attended lectures. We are now planning a second series for the fall.

The Public Intellectuals Lecture Series aims to create a bridge between scholars in the Arts and the general public. While the complex ideas these scholars help develop have important, real world applications to the way we understand and interact with each other, they are often couched in jargon and confined to the journals and lecture halls of the academic sphere. This lecture series will offer a venue and format in which scholars can present these ideas to the public in an accessible manner.