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REMINDER: Due June 1: SAMLA Special Session: Hybrid Networks: Literature and Science in Early Modern England

updated: 
Monday, May 18, 2015 - 1:21pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference

This panel welcomes papers on the various social, intellectual, or textual networks among authors and consumers of early modern literature and science. This panel seeks to understand what new networks of influence or collaboration we can discover by pairing disparate genres/fields of inquiry in the early modern period. Essentially, this panel asks: how can disparate or shared methods of signification within literary and scientific genres challenge our understanding of the early modern production of knowledge?

Ecologies in Early Modern English Drama

updated: 
Monday, May 18, 2015 - 8:15am
Renaissance Society of America

Recent theoretical approaches to early modern literature ranging from ecocriticism to cognitive science have applied the term ecology to discuss the collective relations of persons, beings, and things. This panel seeks to explore the ways in which these collective experiences and portrayals manifest in dramatic works and the spaces in which they were performed, beginning with the establishment of the first commercial theatres and ending with the closure of the playhouses in 1642.

Paper abstracts (under 150 words) and truncated CVs of 300 words (maximum) are due by 4 June 2015. Please submit these materials to Mark Kaethler (mkaethle@uoguelph.ca).

Reading the Queer in Literature, Film, Culture and Theory [Journal Issue & Ed. Vol.]

updated: 
Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 5:31pm
The Apollonian: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies [http://theapollonian.in]

The Apollonian: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies
[http://theapollonian.in]
Vol. 2, Issue 2

Reading the Queer in Literature, Film, Culture and Theory
[Journal Issue & Ed. Vol.]

Submissions are invited for the forthcoming issue of "The Apollonian" on the representations of the 'queer' in the various genres and sub-genres of literature, art, cinema, culture, critical theory, philosophy and history. The papers are expected to be scholarly in nature, and yet accessible to a fairly general readership.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

[UPDATE] SAMLA 87, 13-15 Nov. 2015--Shared Politics: Political Adaptations, Appropriations, and Influences

updated: 
Saturday, May 16, 2015 - 5:03pm
Phillip Zapkin

This panel seeks interesting and innovative papers in the field of adaptation studies. As Linda Hutcheon writes in A Theory of Adaptation, adapters "are just as likely to want to contest the aesthetic or political values of the adapted text as to pay homage." Our panelists will explore the political uses to which adaptation is put, considering why and how authors adapt specific texts for political purposes. We will consider the possibilities and limitations of using adaptation as a political tool.

Montaigne in Early Modern England and Scotland

updated: 
Friday, May 15, 2015 - 7:06pm
Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Durham University, England

Montaigne in Early Modern England and Scotland

Confirmed speakers:

Warren Boutcher (Queen Mary)
Will Hamlin (Washington State)
Katie Murphy (Oxford)
John O'Brien (Durham)
Richard Scholar (Oxford)
David Louis Sedley (Haverford)

Dates: Fri.-Sat. 6-7 Nov. 2015

Sexual Violence on the Early Modern English Stage

updated: 
Friday, May 15, 2015 - 4:42pm
RSA Boston 2016

This session seeks to explore the representation of sexual violence on the English stage as both a trope and as an articulation of early modern patriarchal systems of authority and governance. From the threatened rape of Mariana in Pericles to Heywood's Rape of Lucrece and Fletcher's Bonduca, sexual violence permeated the London stage. By considering the role of sexual violence within early modern theatrical culture, this session will investigate how anxieties regarding gender norms were literally performed, how individual playwrights resisted, complied with, or complicated prevailing notions of gendered behaviour, and how the threat of sexual violence functioned as a strategy of gendered governance in the period.

RSA 2016 Panel: Receptions of Classical Texts on the Early Modern English Stage

updated: 
Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 3:54pm
Benjamin Beier / Washburn University

Generations of scholars have worked to uncover the presence of classical sources in early modern English drama. And Shakespeare studies, in particular, has labored to undo the impression that Shakespeare had 'small Latin and less Greek.' Recent work not only has revealed classical antecedents, but also has argued about the function of such sources within plays. This panel seeks papers that add to our understanding of the role of classical texts on the early modern stage. For example, are there instances in which the function of classical texts has been misunderstood by critics? In what ways did early modern playwrights productively misunderstand sources?

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