Subscribe to renaissance

renaissance

Melusine's Footprint: Tracing the Legacy of a Medieval Myth

updated: 
Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 9:49am
full name / name of organization: 
Misty Urban
contact email: 

Matriarch, monster, muse, and myth: While the late 14th c French prose romance by Jean d'Arras arguably remains the earliest and most-translated version of the story of Melusine—in which he envisions her as a foundress of the powerful Lusignan family—the figure of the fairy woman cursed with a half-human, half-serpent form traveled widely through the legends of medieval and early modern Europe. From Thüring von Ringoltingen's German iteration of 1456, which gave rise to the popular chapbook, and related folktales that brought Melusine decisively to the European medieval imaginary, Melusine's variants surface in countries and centuries beyond.

CFP: UC Berkeley Graduate Student Conference "Leaps of Faith" Deadline: 09/15/14

updated: 
Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 6:04pm
full name / name of organization: 
Department of Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley

Call for Papers

Deadline September 15, 2014

Leaps of Faith: Figurations of Belief in Literature and Critical Thought

Hosted by The Department of Comparative Literature
University of California, Berkeley
November 21-22, 2014.

This conference aims to explore diverse acts of faith and their significance in both secular and religious contexts. We welcome submissions from graduate students from all disciplinary backgrounds. Abstracts due to ucbleapsoffaith@gmail.com by September 15, 2014.

Leaps of Faith: Figurations of Belief in Literature and Critical Thought

Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference, UC Berkeley

ANZAMEMS 10th Biennial Conference 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 2:30am
full name / name of organization: 
Australian and New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies
contact email: 

Australian and New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies
10th Biennial Conference
The University of Queensland
14-18 July 2015

Sponsored by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, The University of Queensland

Keynote speakers:

- Professor Alexandra Walsham (Cambridge)
- Professor Laura Knoppers (Notre Dame)
- Professor Jessie Ann Owens (UC Davis)

We invite proposals for papers and panels for ANZAMEMS 2015.

Poem Unlimited: New Perspectives on Poetry and Genre (Augsburg, Germany, Oct 1-3, 2015)

updated: 
Monday, August 18, 2014 - 1:26pm
full name / name of organization: 
University of Augsburg, Germany

Call for Papers

Poem Unlimited: New Perspectives on Poetry and Genre
International Conference, Augsburg, October 1-3, 2015

When Polonius, in the second act of Hamlet, announces the theater company as the "best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral, scene individable, or poem unlimited," he points to several problems that have pervaded scholarship on poetry and genre.

Food and Sustainability: Towards a Culinary Ecology

updated: 
Saturday, August 16, 2014 - 3:52pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 

Interest in the fields of food and sustainability studies within the humanities is rapidly growing, in part due to their ability to investigate our perceived relationship with ecology. Food is a text that conveys identity, reflecting historically grounded or socially constructed attitudes through what is produced and consumed, both gastronomic and printed. Likewise, the connection between nature and culture as manifested in narratives allow us to recognize the discourse and disconnect between society and our environment, marking us through this relationship. Central to both fields is the interplay of humanity and environment, depicted in rural and urban ecologies, e.g. food deserts versus urban food jungles.

Adaptation Section of the 2015 PCA/ACA National Conference in New Orleans, April 1-4

updated: 
Friday, August 15, 2014 - 3:41pm
full name / name of organization: 
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association
contact email: 

Adaptation and Intertextuality

Papers on any and all aspects of adaptation will be considered, including but not limited to novel to film/play/TV adaptations, short story to film/TV adaptations, film to novel adaptations, stage play to radio adaptations, painting to novel/film adaptations, theme park attraction to film adaptations, video game to opera adaptations, or any other kind of adaptation you can think of!

Medieval Drama: Expanding the Canon--Period, Performance, and Pedagogy

updated: 
Friday, August 15, 2014 - 9:21am
full name / name of organization: 
Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (MRDS)

Because of the resurgence of medieval drama scholarship, 2015 is a fitting point at which to reassess our notions of a "medieval drama canon." Recent work has shown that medieval drama, like medieval literature in general, traverses multiple genres and historical periods. We also know that individual and communal audiences witnessed the drama in several sites, public and private. Moreover, the recent publications of several new "classroom" texts—in the forms of stand-alone editions and anthologies—show that instructors are moving beyond the traditional teaching texts, such as Mankind and the Towneley Second Shepherds Play, of the last several decades.

Roundtable on Perspectives in Historicist Pedagogy • NeMLA Convention (April 30-May 3, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 4:36pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

How has the historicist turn in literary studies changed undergraduate teaching? What do historicist and/or materialist scholars teach, how, and with (or without) what kinds of materials? Inviting perspectives from the range of languages and fields represented by the MLA, this roundtable session invites proposals for presentations that either theorize principles in historicist pedagogy or present examples of syllabi, course texts, classroom practices, and assignments informed by historicist approaches to scholarship. Submit a 300-word abstract by Sept. 30 to the NeMLA website (registration required):

College Literature: A Journal of Critical Literary Studies

updated: 
Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 10:04am
full name / name of organization: 
Graham MacPhee / College Literature: A Journal of Critical Literary Studies
contact email: 

College Literature is an international, peer-reviewed academic journal published in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Press. CL is dedicated to publishing high quality, original, and innovative scholarly research from across the discipline of literary studies. The journal is currently considering manuscripts for publication in our general issues forthcoming in 2015 (Volume 42). We welcome submissions from across the various periods, intellectual fields, and topics of Anglophone and comparative literary studies for inclusion in our forthcoming general issues. We particularly encourage submissions that interrogate the terms of their own critical practice and reflect on the current parameters of literary study.

NeMLA 2015: Unexpected Affect in Shakespearean Drama

updated: 
Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 4:59pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This panel will explore the ways in which Shakespearean drama delivers emotional intensity (passions, affectations, embodiment, etc.) in unexpected places. When might certain emotional reactions be surprising in Shakespeare's plays? Are there particular characters that share their feelings unexpectedly, yet with astonishing resonance?

The significance of this session is to explore whether, after four centuries of exposure, these can still be capable of emotionally shocking. In today's academic climate, do Shakespeare's words have the potential to be so emotionally disturbing that students might/can/should expect a "trigger warning" on syllabi?

Lydgate and London at Kalamazoo 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 12:28pm
full name / name of organization: 
Lydgate Society
contact email: 

The session proposes to trace Lydgate's importance as a poet of the city. Within the space between social classes and their respective expectations, Lydgate's poetry traced the outline of London: the urban heart of England and the moral mirror of its people. Lydgate was not just a court poet, but a civic poet – a poet whose writings shaped the public sentiments of London's people, mediated between the desires of the aristocracy and the power of the citizenry, and, in doing so, articulated the experience of London life.

Pages