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[UPDATE] CFP: Early Modern Utopian Literature

Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 2:20pm
Southeast Renaissance Conference, SAMLA Affiliate

2016 marks the 500th anniversary of the first printing of Thomas More's Utopia, the text that created and provided the name for its own genre. Since the appearance of More's text, utopias have been imagined as unreal realities and worlds where people exist according to a specific vision of an author, whose aim might be justice, art, or an imagined reality with a specific agenda.

We request abstracts that address any aspect of early modern utopianism. Please submit 250-300 word abstracts along with a brief bio or a one page C.V. by May 15, 2016 to: Dr. Ruth McIntyre,

Planned Obsolescence: Texts, Theory, Technology

Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 9:21am
Université de Liège (Belgium)

Call for papers
Planned Obsolescence: Texts, theory, technology
Université de Liège (Belgium) - December 8th and 9th, 2016

[Pour le français, voir plus bas.]

UPDATE: Extended Deadline for the 31st Annual Interdisciplinary Conference in the Humanities

Monday, May 2, 2016 - 2:06pm
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures University of West Georgia


The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, the College of Arts and Humanities, and the University of West Georgia (UWG) invite you to celebrate the 31th Annual Interdisciplinary Conference in the Humanities, September 22-September 24, 2016. We welcome submissions from across the Humanities, Fine Arts, and the Social and Natural Sciences, dealing with NATURE/CULTURE/COMMERCE and its many crossroads and intersections. Papers, exhibits, performances and screenings may be submitted by scholars, graduate students, writers, artists, and performers. Papers in French, German, or Spanish are welcome when part of a pre-organized panel.

[UPDATE] Urban Studies - MPCA/ACA 2016 Conference May 15 Extended Deadline

Monday, May 2, 2016 - 12:07pm
Megan Cannella/MPCA/ACA

Call for Papers
Urban Studies Area
2016 Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association Conference

Thursday-Sunday, 6-9 October 2016
Chicago, IL - Hilton Rosemont Chicago O'Hare
Extended Deadline: May 15, 2016

The Urban Studies Area of The Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association is now accepting proposals for its upcoming Conference in October 2016.

CFP: Critiquing Humanism (Deadline May 15, 2016)

Monday, May 2, 2016 - 8:20am
Sanglap: Journal of Literary and Cultural Inquiry Vol 3 No 1

The recent refugee crisis in Europe has brought to the fore the pressing aspects of the precarious nature of human life. This is not a sudden crisis as scholars have traced its historical roots with the exploits of "Western" capitalism, imperialism, environment, and war on terror. Such engagement has also given us different politico-philosophical points of analysis of the condition: for instance, the rise of terms such as "precariat," "new subaltern," "precarity" (Guy Standing; Simon During), the debates on "Anthropocene" and "capitalocene" (Dipesh Chakraborty; Jason W Moore), or the interest in neuro-biological or communal human affects (Catherine Malabou; Judith Butler). Added to such is the challenge of the machines and objects in our daily life.

Call for Papers - Gender and Textual Mobility, ANZAMEMS conference 7-10 February 2017

Monday, May 2, 2016 - 2:12am
Early Modern Women's Research Network

The Early Modern Women's Research Network (EMWRN) is convening panels on Gender and Textual Mobility at the upcoming ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Medieval and Early Modern Society) conference in Wellington, 7-10 February, 2017.

This is the 11th biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and three keynote speakers have an interest in gender in the medieval and early modern world: Professor Lorna Hutson (English, St Andrews, sponsored by EMWRN), Professor Martha Howell (History, Columbia), and Dr Erin Griffey (Art History, Auckland).

SLSA 2016 – Creating Accounts of Creative Bodies: the Narrative Work of Fertility

Sunday, May 1, 2016 - 9:57pm
Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts (SLSA)

Babies perform a lot of narrative work. George Eliot's Middlemarch narrator playfully quips that "where there was a baby, things were right enough," and that "error, in general, was a mere lack of that central poising force," and this is often as true for narratives themselves as for the characters therein. Babies often serve as forces of disruption or normatization in literary texts, and this panel seeks to explore the narrative work that the (pro)creative and (pro)created bodies of mothers and babies perform. This panel seeks to situate the creative work of female reproduction in the context of its narrative creation, taking seriously the textual creation and performance of fertility in literary texts.