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RSA 2018 The Bard's Bookshelf: Shakespeare's Use of Sources

updated: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:38am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017

William Shakespeare’s oeuvre is comprised of multiple forms, including the play, the sonnet, and the narrative poem and spans a wide variety of genres, including comedy, tragedy, history, epic, and romance. Because of his contributions to the western canon, modern scholarship tends to focus on Shakespeare the writer. Yet, we often forget another aspect of his literary life: Shakespeare the reader. In crafting his work, Shakespeare borrows heavily from Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance literature of all genres, including poetry, epic, drama, and prose fiction, and incorporates references to mythological, religious, rhetorical and philosophical texts throughout his works.

Early Modern English Domestic Tragedy

updated: 
Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 2:31pm
A special issue of Early Modern Literary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 1, 2017

Essays of c. 7000 words are invited for a special issue of Early Modern Literary Studies on domestic tragedy.  Possible topics might include individual plays (e.g. Arden of Faversham, A Warning for Fair Women, The English Traveller, A Woman Killed with Kindness, The Miseries of Enforced Marriage, Two Lamentable Tragedies); lost domestic tragedies (e.g.

Women and the Rituals of Death in the Early Modern World

updated: 
Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 2:31pm
Emily Fine/ RSA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, May 18, 2017

This panel will explore women’s involvement in the death and memorial practices of the early modern world. While early modern women were actively involved in the processes that surround death and dying, they are curiously absent from prescriptive advice in ars moriendi treatises of the late sixteenth and seventeenth century, which typically feature a dying man surrounded by a retinue of male advisors and friends. This exclusion creates a disjunction between the representation and the reality of women’s involvement in the rituals of death. This panel will begin to piece apart this disjunction by examining the following questions: What roles did women perform in the rituals of dying, and how were their actions represented in literature or art?

Early Modern Spectacles

updated: 
Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 2:35pm
Journal for the Study of British Cultures (special issue)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Call for Papers

JSBC 2018/1

Early Modern Spectacles

(edited by Susanne Gruss & Lena Steveker)

 

CFP Extension: Migration(s): Body, Word, Spirit

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:37pm
Medieval and Early Modern Field Committee at the University of Maryland
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Extended Call for Papers

 

University of Maryland

Medieval and Early Modern Field Committee

                                                                                                      Annual Conference

10-11 November 2017

College Park, Maryland

 

Migration(s): Body, Word, Spirit

 

UVA-Wise Medieval/Renaissance, Sept. 21-23, 2017 (Undergrad) (proposals by July 1, 2017)

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:58pm
University of Virginia's College at Wise
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

Medieval-Renaissance Conference XXXI
Undergraduate Sessions
The University of Virginia’s College at Wise
September 21-23, 2017

Keynote Address:  “Historiated Bruts: How Manuscript Illustration Twisted History in the fifteenth-Century English Chronicle”—Elizabeth J. Bryan, Brown University

RSA: Spenser's Pleasures

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:59pm
Spenser Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, May 25, 2017

Spenser's Pleasures: We seek papers on pleasure in Spenser's poetry: erotic, aesthetic, voyeuristic, indecorous, unlikely, limited, unruly, healthy and unhealthy.  Possible frameworks may include the Horatian pairing of instruction and delight, the didactic or anti-didactic value of pleasure, the relation of pleasure to action (as in a Ciceronian commitment to moving, for example), the relation of pleasure to questions of value (variously conceived), as well as pleasure's antitheses—disgust, pain, or loathing.  What is the place of pleasure in attacks on early modern poetry?  In poetry's defense?   We are interested in thinking about Spenser's verse in relation to the history of aesthetics but we are also interested in reversing

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