Subscribe to renaissance

renaissance

Beowulf to Shakespeare Area

updated: 
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 - 11:31am
Mid-Atlantic Popular American Culture Association (MAPACA), November 3-5, Atlantic City, NJ
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 7, 2016

The Medieval/Renassiance area of MAPACA ("Beowulf to Shakespeare") seeks papers concerning the use of medieval and Renaissance materials in modern productions.  Topics include, but are not limited to, the incorporation of medieval or Renaissance elements in modern artistic productions such as films, t.v. series, novels and music; the creation of medieval and Renaissance "themed" festivals, restaurants, etc., and the use of medieval or Renaissance elements in video games.   The area also seeks panelists interested in presenting on the ways in which contemporary theories and pedagogies influence our perceptions of these eras.

Two Shakespeare Panels for ICMS Kalamazoo 2017

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:52am
Shakespeare at Kalamazoo
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Shakespeare at Kalamazoo

International Congress for Medieval Studies 2017

 

Shakespeare at Kalamazoo invites submissions for two sessions at the 2017 Congress, which will be held at Western Michigan University on May 11-14, 2017.

 

‘For they are the abstract and brief chronicles of the time’: Negotiating Shakespearean Characters in Performance from Past to Present

updated: 
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 - 11:14am
One of the Seminars of Asian Shakespeare Association, Biennial International Conference, New Delhi, 1-3 December, 2016
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

In criticism, relying on character study or treating Shakespearean characters as real
people, has often been censured. But, in performance, where actors especially need to
get under the skin of the characters they portray, Shakespearean personae do exhibit
some kind of biographical reality.

Rethinking Early Modern Subjectivity (NeMLA 2017)

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:31am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Modernity is often defined as a series of political, social, and economic shifts related to the emergence of an autonomous subject. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus of how to measure the underlying forces driving this supposed change of paradigm. In light of recent approaches to subjectivity, we invite participants to circulate 5-8 pages papers (with theoretical or empirical foci on the topic) and discuss them after a brief presentation. The goal of the seminar is therefore to interrogate the condition of the “early modern subject” through the analysis of established binaries such as (but not limited to) unity/plurality, transcendence/immanence, individual/communal, East/West, local/global, medieval/modern, etc.

Fourteenth Annual Graduate Conference at the Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:13am
Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 4, 2016

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst will host its fourteenth annual graduate student conference on Saturday, October 1st, 2016. We are delighted to welcome Diana Henderson of MIT as our keynote speaker.

 

Pre-Modernisms

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:13am
Pearl Kibre Medieval Study
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Pre-Modernisms: Friday, October 28th, The Graduate Center, CUNY

12th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference

Encountering Shakespeare

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:09am
Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 15, 2016

Inviting proposals for

ENCOUNTERING SHAKESPEARE

The 40th Annual Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference

October 20–22, 2016

Wright State University Dayton, Ohio

Proposals accepted until August 15, 2016

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Ayanna Thompson, Professor of English at George Washington University  

Dr. Curtis Perry, Professor of English at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 

Is There A Working Class In This Literature Class?

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:08am
Dan Bender/neMLA 2017 Baltimore
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

While labor economics and political theory regularly engage the phenomenon of class conflict, literary study often glosses over it. This roundtable seeks to resuscitate the vexed question of class-bias in the academy, as reflected in the absence of or meager attention given to literary representations of working class consciousness. Papers drawing from any literary chronology and any genres are welcomed.  The purpose of this roundtable is  first to explore the marginalization of working class life but then to  propose a remedy. How can literary studies acquire cross-class agency, recognizing  working class experience within a traditional literary canon?  This will be the roundtable's culminating question for presenters and attendees.

Space, Place and Image in Early Modern English Literature (Lausanne, 11-13 May 2017)

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 8:54am
Kader Hegedüs and Sonia Pernet / University of Lausanne
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 19, 2016

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Dr. Mary Morrissey (University of Reading)

Professor Andrew McRae (University of Exeter)

Expanding on our ongoing research project on the spatial and visual dimensions of the poetry and prose of John Donne, we are organising a conference seeking to investigate issues of ‘Space, Place and Image in Early Modern English Literature’ (c. 1500-1700). The conference will take place on the beautiful campus of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, on 11-13 May 2017.

Call for Scholarly Articles

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 9:47am
The Shakespeare Newsletter
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2016

The Shakespeare Newsletter seeks submissions of a scholarly nature and scope (4000-6000 words) on contemporary engagements with Shakespeare/Early Modern English Drama and/or Theater. We expect “contemporary engagements” to be understood in the most general of ways, including but not limited to the following: contemporary appropriations, approximations, and adaptations; film; performance; digital media; new theoretical approaches; new pedagogies; popular culture; global Shakespeare; archival encounters. Submissions will undergo double-blind peer-review.  One accepted essay will appear in each issue as “The Pendleton Essay,” named after the late SN editor, Thomas Pendleton.

Sport in Italian Literature and Arts: NEMLA 2017, Baltimore MD

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 9:45am
Francesco Brenna
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The panel is dedicated to the relationship between sport and Italian literature. How is sport portrayed in Italian literature? How does it function within a literary work? Is sport employed only as metaphors and to add a touch of color, or does it have deeper meanings? What can it tell us about an author? Papers on literary and artistic aspects of sport in journalism or various media, as well as on sport and the visual arts, cinema, etc., are welcome.

 

Please submit your abstract online by September 30, 2016:

 

https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16216

The Great Fire: Reconsidered

updated: 
Monday, June 13, 2016 - 4:23pm
Gabriella Infante & Rebecca Rideal
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

The Great Fire: Reconsidered – Call for Papers

3 September 2016 – Wren Suite, St Paul’s Cathedral

 

The Great Fire of London has long been held as a watershed moment in London’s history. Over the course of four days in September 1666, an infernal blaze claimed over 13,000 houses, 87 churches and 52 livery halls, and rendered an estimated 70,000 people homeless. Yet while cellars still burned there were whispers at court that the conflagration might actually be ‘the greatest blessing that God ever conferred’ upon King Charles II because it had crippled the ‘rebellious’ City of London; forever opening its gates to royal power.

Pages