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UVA-Wise Medieval/Renaissance, Sept. 15-17, 2016 (Undergrad) (proposals by July 15, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:57am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Virginia's College at Wise
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

The University of Virginia's College at Wise’s Medieval-Renaissance Conference is pleased to accept abstracts for our thirtieth conference.  The conference is an open event that promotes scholarly discussion in all disciplines of Medieval and Renaissance studies.  Papers by undergraduates covering any area of medieval and renaissance studies—including literature, language, history, philosophy, science, pedagogy, and the arts—are welcome.  Abstracts for papers should be around 300 words in length and should be accompanied by a brief letter of recommendation from a faculty sponsor (the latter can be mailed or emailed separately).  A branch campus of the University of Virginia, the University of Virginia’s College at Wise is a public four-year liberal arts c

Shakespeare's Ashes

updated: 
Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:53am
full name / name of organization: 
Supriya Chaudhuri/ Shakespeare Society of India
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

Shakespeare’s Ashes

An International Conference, organized by the Shakespeare Society of India

New Delhi, October 21st-22nd, 2016

 

Witchcraft & Catholicism in the Early Modern Period

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:11am
full name / name of organization: 
Rocky Mountain Medieval & Renaissance Association at the RSA
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

This panel seeks proposals which address works (artistic, literary, historical, etc.) at the intersection of Catholicism and witchcraft (demons, devils, witches, magic, etc.) between 1500 and 1700 in England and/or Continental Europe. Of particular interest are works which link witchcraft and Catholicism; critique governmental or religious responses to witchcraft and/or Catholicism; and/or representations in literature or drama which compare witchcraft and/or Catholicism.

“I do love these ancient ruins”-- Ruinophilia in Early Modern Literature and Culture / RSA 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Margaret Owens, Nipissing University
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 28, 2016

 

Ruinophilia, Ruin Porn, Ruin Lust – the roots of post-modernity’s recent enthralment with ruins are often traced back to the eighteenth-century cult of the sublime. However, Antonio’s remark, “I do love these ancient ruins,” in John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi, suggests that versions of ruinophilia were very much alive in the early seventeenth century. This proposed panel for the Renaissance Society of America conference (30 March-1 April 2017 in Chicago) seeks papers that explore the fascination with ruins in sixteenth and seventeenth-century literary and cultural venues.  

 

The Ancient Novel in the Renaissance RSA 2017 Chicago

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

 Though many modern scholars place the invention of the novel in the 18th century, the genre arose much earlier. Early Modern works such as those by Sidney, Rabelais, and Cervantes may be classified as novels. However, the genre has its origins in the ancient Greek and Roman novels of the second and third centuries. While these works are often forgotten in the present day, they were translated during the Renaissance and were among the most widely read texts of the Early Modern period. Their popularity stemmed from their content and their structures, as they synthesized and examined several genres in a single prose work. As a result, echoes of the ancient novel are present in Renaissance romance, satire, poetry, and theatre.

Forms of Imperfection in the English Renaissance (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Andrew Carlson, Thomas Fulton / Rutgers University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

While early modern writers sought “the perfect perfection of poesy” (to borrow the words of William Webbe), forms of imperfection have become central to our understanding of the period and its literary accomplishments. Scholars have lately looked to categories such as eccentricity, errancy, and incoherence as they have tried to understand the rise of English vernacular eloquence and the distinction of poetic making over the course of the early modern period.

Unreasonable, Speculative, Fantastic: Women’s Parapolitical Creativity During the English Civil Wars (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Jantina Ellens, McMaster University; Chantelle Thauvette, Siena College
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 20, 2016

This panel proposes to explore English Civil War writing outside of its traditionally historical and male-focused frames. Research by Diane Purkiss, Mihoko Suzuki, and Susan Wiseman draws attention to gendered ways of understanding history and politics in the literatures of the Civil Wars, but there remain many more “areas of excess and gaps and silences where unreason flourishes” (Purkiss 4) that have yet to be explored.  

The Body and Spiritual Experience: 1500-1700 (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Monday, May 9, 2016 - 3:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
Victoria Brownlee
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 20, 2016

Abstracts are invited for a proposed series of sessions on the body and spiritual experience in Europe 1500-1700, intended for the next Renaissance Society of America meeting (30 March–1 April 2017, Chicago). Possible questions might include: In what ways does biblical reading shape understanding of the relationship between physical and spiritual matter?  Which body parts or material processes are implicated in spiritual experience?

New Approaches to Early Modern Skepticism / RSA 2017

updated: 
Sunday, May 8, 2016 - 9:22am
full name / name of organization: 
Brent Dawson, Cassie Miura, Amanda Kellogg
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 20, 2016

 

    Over the past 30 years, scholars have written extensively on the influence of skepticism in the early modern period, frequently characterizing the philosophical school as a threat to the era’s epistemology, ethics, and religion. But could skepticism also work to generate meaning, create stability, or provide a sense of tranquility? This panel series seeks to build on and compliment earlier readings by examining how ancient philosophical models-- such as Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Pyrrhonism-- as well as the skeptical texts available to early modern readers might complicate our current understanding of skepticism as a fundamentally destabilizing or disruptive force.

Shakespeare's Londons/London's Shakespeare

updated: 
Sunday, May 8, 2016 - 9:21am
full name / name of organization: 
Literary London Journal
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2016

To tie in with the forthcoming Literary London Conference (6 - 8 July 2016) on the theme of 'London and the Globe', the Literary London Journal invites contributions for a special issue on 'Shakespeare's Londons/London's Shakespeares'.
The deadline for submissions is 31 August 2016 and articles (between 5,000 - 7,000 words long) might broadly address one or more of the following topics or questions:
·       How are ‘Londoners’ (Henry VIII, 1.2.155) constructed in Shakespeare’s plays?
·       What role did – or do – London audiences play in constructing Shakespeare?
·       In what ways can we rethink Shakespeare’s anatopism, ie. his staging of London as other cities?

Reprobate Humanisms in Early Modern England

updated: 
Friday, May 6, 2016 - 2:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Daniel R. Gibbons, Catholic University of America; Ben Beier, Washburn University
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

It would be difficult to disentangle fully the various strands of religious reform in early modern England from the educational, aesthetic, and philosophical movements that fall under the broad term 'humanism'.  Nevertheless, the relationship between religious reform and new developments in various humanist projects was not always peaceful. The tensions between humanism and religious reform provoke many questions:  Where were the lines of fracture in the symbiotic relationship between religious reform and the humanisms of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England? Did religious reform restrict the development of humanism in England, or did it promote a new flourishing of humanism?

Ben Jonson First Folio Quadricentennial Conference

updated: 
Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 7:08am
full name / name of organization: 
University of North Georgia
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Our first bi-annual conference on early modern verse drama by Shakespeare’s contemporaries will commemorate the 400th anniversary of the 1616 folio publication of Ben Jonson’s Workes. We’re calling for papers that examine some aspect of one or more of the playtexts found within this volume, but we also welcome topics involving Jonson’s works in performance or Jonson’s influence on seventeenth-century print culture. The conference will be held at the Gainesville campus of the University of North Georgia on September 23 and 24, 2016.

[UPDATE] CFP: Early Modern Utopian Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 2:20pm
full name / name of organization: 
Southeast Renaissance Conference, SAMLA Affiliate

2016 marks the 500th anniversary of the first printing of Thomas More's Utopia, the text that created and provided the name for its own genre. Since the appearance of More's text, utopias have been imagined as unreal realities and worlds where people exist according to a specific vision of an author, whose aim might be justice, art, or an imagined reality with a specific agenda.

We request abstracts that address any aspect of early modern utopianism. Please submit 250-300 word abstracts along with a brief bio or a one page C.V. by May 15, 2016 to: Dr. Ruth McIntyre, rmcinty1@kennesaw.edu.

[UPDATE] International Conference: Film Adaptation: Theory, Practices, Reception - May 2017 Thessaloniki

updated: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 6:52am
full name / name of organization: 
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Film Adaptation: Theory, Practices, Reception

School of Film Studies and School of English
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

May 25-27, 2017
Thessaloniki

Keynote Speaker: Deborah Cartmell

Site: http://filmadaptationthessaloniki2017.web.auth.gr/

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