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Call for papers Journal of Digital Humanities

Saturday, March 26, 2016 - 4:39pm
Journal of Humanities and Cultural Studies R&D

submission via website

or email:

The Journal of Digital Humanities is a comprehensive, peer-reviewed, open access journal that features scholarship, tools, and conversations produced, identified, and tracked by members of the digital humanities community through Digital Humanities Now.

[UPDATE] Early Modern Women Writers

Saturday, March 26, 2016 - 4:16am
Professor James Fitzmaurice (University Northern Arizona) and Othello's Island (CVAR)

Early Modern Women Writers (approx. 1550-1700)
at Othello's Island CVAR, Nicosia, Cyprus
5 to 9 April 2017

Early Modern Women Writers is a semi-autonomous conference strand within the annual interdisciplinary conference on medieval, renaissance and early modern studies, held annually since 2013, in Cyprus, called Othello's Island.

As a whole, Othello's Island attracts approximately 100 delegates, whose topics include archaeology, art history, history, and literary studies, to name but a few. Since its inception a significant section of the conference has covered early modern women writers, such as Mary Wroth, Aphra Behn and Margaret Cavendish.

Translating Genre, Language, Power

Friday, March 25, 2016 - 9:04am
Midwest Modern Language Association

In the Middle Ages, there existed a concept known as translatio studii. Broadly speaking, this term refers to the transfer of cultural knowledge from one language and literature to another, often in the context of political and cultural conquest. These adaptations are often representative of the individual contributing components but manage to create new knowledge through overlap or expanding boundaries of culture, and authority.

In the spirit of translatio studii, this panel seeks to explore the adaptation of texts and concepts across time, language, media, history, gender, and socio-political power structures. All papers from any time period or culture addressing this interweaving and adaptation of meaning via language are welcome.