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Student conference: Julius Caesar, Shakespeare, and the Legitimacy of Rule

updated: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 10:57am
Ohio State University, Mansfield campus
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 26, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS for "Julius Caesar, Shakespeare, and the Legitimacy of Rule," a multi-disciplinary conference for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students.

Conference: Friday, November 4, 2016 at the Mansfield campus of Ohio State (Mansfield, OH).

Proposals due: September 26, 2016.

Papers, panels, roundtables, paired presentations, short performances, multi-­media experiences, static displays, and other entries of the widest possible submission style are encouraged for this academic conference. One session will include faculty-led discussion tables for work-­in-­progress.

Braniff Conference in the Liberal Arts: On Friendship

updated: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 11:08am
Braniff Graduate Student Association, University of Dallas
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 31, 2016

3rd Annual Braniff Conference in the Liberal Arts

 

On Friendship

 

Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts

University of Dallas, Irving, TX

January 28, 2017

 

Keynote Speaker: TBA

 

Collecting The Monstrous

updated: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 11:21am
MEARCSTAPA (Monsters: the Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Collecting the Monstrous

MEARCSTAPA (Monsters: the Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application)

Panel for the 2017 MAP (Medieval Association of the Pacific) Conference at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA 

Vagantes Conference on Medieval Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 11:21am
University of Notre Dame
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 2, 2016

March 9–11, 2017 at the University of Notre Dame.

Vagantes, North America’s largest graduate student conference for medieval studies, is seeking submissions for its 16th annual meeting at the University, of Notre Dame, March 9–11.

NeMLA 2017 The Godly and the Grotesque: The Monstrous Body in Antiquity and Beyond

updated: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 11:21am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

In the modern era, the word “monster” has taken on a negative implication, frequently referring to an entity that is fearsome or even harmful. The term has its origins in the Latin monstrum, which meant demonstration or divine sign, and the Greek word teras, which may be translated as strange, wonderful, or marvelous and can signify any entity composed of multiple parts. The “monstrous” figures prominently in descriptions of hybrid creatures originating in Greco-Roman mythology, but these images were often deployed in order to render philosophical, religious, and political ideas.

Shakespeare and Africa

updated: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 11:37am
Cahiers Shakespeare en devenir
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, April 30, 2017

This issue would like to explore the relationship between Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, that of Shakespeare but also his contemporaries, and the representation of Africa, or, from a contextual viewpoint, the perception of the African continent in early modern England. The issue will also discuss 19th-21st c. re-writings, appropriations and adaptations of Shakespeare by African and African-American writers, stage directors and film directors.

Proposals may discuss, among other issues:

Slings & Arrows: Performing Shakespeare as Canada

updated: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 11:49am
Kailin Wright (St. Francis Xavier University), Don Moore (University of Guelph), Andrew Bretz (Wilfrid Laurier University)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 1, 2017

Request for Papers
Edited collection for submission to the University of Toronto Press.

Slings & Arrows: Performing Shakespeare as Canada

Edited by Kailin Wright (St. Francis Xavier University), Don Moore (University of Guelph), Andrew Bretz (Wilfrid Laurier University)

 

Body Language, Bawdy Talk: Sex and Form in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 11:53am
University of Michigan Early Modern Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Early Modern Colloquium at the University of Michigan
invites abstracts for papers for their interdisciplinary graduate student conference,
"Body Language, Bawdy Talk: Sex and Form in Medieval and Early Modern Culture"
at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, March 9-11, 2017.

With keynote lectures by:

Jeffrey Masten (Northwestern) and
Zrinka Stahuljak (UCLA)

And panel responses from the medieval
and early modern faculty at the University of Michigan.

 

New Politics in Early Modern English Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2016 - 1:25pm
Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Since the advent of new historicism and the later development of cultural materialism, politics have been a topic of interest in early modern literature, and recent studies have asked us to conceive of them in new and broader ways, whether they be environmental, ecological, or cognitive, and to focus on different and overlooked outlets, such as pamphlets, free speech, or emotions.

This panel defines politics as an implementation or projection of governance—by a monarch in a kingdom, the head of a household in a domicile, etc.—and aims to assess early modern literature’s ability to present a wide scope of competing politics or political relations by offering the interpretation and/or voicing of plural or alternate realities.

Coriolanus in Focus -- NeMLA 2017 Baltimore

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2016 - 2:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Shakespeare's late play Coriolanus at first glance seems to be a straightforward case of a haughty patrician whose own pride leads to his loss of stature and life—a tragedy in the classic mold. The majority opinion echoes Olivier who likened him to "a very straightforward, reactionary son of a so-and-so" whose "thoughts are not deep" and Curry who labelled him as "one of the hardest characters to like." However, interesting characters—Shakespeare raised many—resist categorizing.

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