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The Worlds That Plague Made: Cultures of Disease in the Medieval and Early Modern Period

updated: 
Friday, November 17, 2017 - 11:15am
Medieval and Renaissance Center (NYU)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

The Annual Conference at the Medieval and Renaissance Center will be held on April 13th and 14th. This year's theme will be "The Worlds That Plague Made: Cultures of Disease in the Medieval and Early Modern Period." Keynote speakers will be Ann Carmichael, Indiana University, and Susan Jones, University of Minnesota.

We invite submissions from any discipline in Medieval and Renaissance Studies on any aspect of the history of plague and disease.

Submissions will be accepted on a rolling basis until January 15th 2018. Please submit a 250 word abstract and a brief CV to marc.center@nyu.edu (put "Conference Submission" in the subject line).

Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

updated: 
Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 3:43pm
Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY); hosted by the Pearl Kibre Medieval Study
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Date: May 4, 2018

 

Location: CUNY Graduate Center

 

Keynote Speaker: Ardis Butterfield, Yale University

 

This event is hosted by Pearl Kibre Medieval Study at the CUNY Graduate Center

 

Monstrous Monarchs/Royal Monsters

updated: 
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 1:17pm
MEARCSTAPA
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 14, 2017

For Medieval Association of the Pacific 2018 Conference, Las Vegas Nevada (April 2018)

2018 Northern Plains Conference on Early British Literature

updated: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 11:20am
Brandon University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018

2018 Northern Plains Conference on Early British Literature

Brandon University, Manitoba, Canada

April 26-28, 2018

Call for papers

We invite abstracts for 20-minute conference presentations on any aspect of British literature from the 18th-century and earlier, for the 2018 NPCEBL annual conference.  Scholars from any academic rank (including undergraduate students) are invited to apply.

Our keynote speaker will be Dr. Randall Martin, Professor at the University of New Brunswick, and author of Shakespeare and Ecology (Oxford University Press, 2015), speaking on the subject of

“Shakespeare and the Natural World”

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Bodies and Boundaries, 1500-1800--March 9-10, 2018

updated: 
Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 1:29pm
Early Modern Center: University of California, Santa Barbara
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 31, 2017

The Early Modern Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites proposals for our annual conference, “Bodies and Boundaries, 1500-1800,” to be held on March 9 and 10, 2018. We are happy to announce our two keynote speakers: Laurie Shannon (Northwestern University) and Michelle Burnham (Santa Clara University).

CFP on “Early Modern English Literature”

updated: 
Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 4:06am
Aletria: A Journal of Literary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 30, 2018

“Early Modern English Literature”

Early modern English authors (c. 1453-1789) wrote in a period of unprecedented national and international political, cultural, social, religious, and scientific changes. Literature in English across a range of traditional and alternative genres reflected, resisted, and redefined these developments. We invite papers that identify and analyse the many forms of evidence of the literary engagement with transformative issues, events, and axes within and outside of the British Isles.

Editors of the number: Elizabeth Sauer (Brock University, Canadá) and Luiz Fernando Ferreira Sá (UFMG)

Submission deadline: April 30th 2018.

[REMINDER: ABSTRACTS DUE 11/1] Bridges to and from the Renaissance (CEA 4/5-7/2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 10:25am
Lynne M. Simpson, College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Call for Papers: “Bridges to and from the Renaissance” at CEA,  April  5-April 7, 2018

| CEA 49th Annual Conference: “Bridges”

| Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront,  333 1st St S, Saint Petersburg, Florida  33701

| Phone: (727) 894-5000

This call for papers is meant to solicit wide-ranging abstracts on the possibilities of the “bridges” in British literature of the 16th and 17th centuries for the 49th annual conference of the College English Association, a collegial gathering of scholars and teachers in English studies. 

Keynote Update: Professor David Norbrook at the Second Annual Early Modern Women Writers’ Colloquium, Nicosia, Cyprus, 25-27 March 2018

updated: 
Monday, October 16, 2017 - 12:42pm
Stella Achilleos
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 22, 2017

We are very pleased to announce that our keynote speaker at the Second Annual Early Modern Women Writers’ Colloquium will be Professor David Norbrook who will speak on Lucy Hutchinson.

 

THE SECOND ANNUAL EARLY MODERN WOMEN WRITERS’ COLLOQUIUM

At the 6th Annual Othello’s Island Conference 2018, Centre for Visual Arts and Research, Nicosia, Cyprus, 25 to 27 March 2018

Full information at www.othellosisland.wixsite.com/emww


Lead Convenors:​

Shakespeare’s Migrants and Exiles – Shakespeare Across Borders

updated: 
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 12:46pm
Shakespeare Seminar 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 30, 2017

In Shakespeare’s works characters are frequently banished from court, from the city or their country. Some move voluntary and many make their first appearance with a history of migration. Some yearn for their home, some are glad to escape persecution. Some bemoan the loss of their identity, some embrace a new identity abroad. People are exiled for various reasons, banished from another’s present, from a place, or from memory. Exile may mean a new chance or certain death. Migrants are greeted with hope, with fear, with fierce rejection. In a more abstract sense, Shakespeare’s plays and poems themselves became migrant texts as they were performed by travelling players or otherwise transmitted across time and space.

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