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CFP: Milton and Paradise Lost (1/6/06; 2/24/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, December 13, 2005 - 2:15pm
Donna M. Souder

A Symposium in Rhetoric: "Milton's Paradise Lost"

Open to Faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars

 

The Federation Rhetoric Committee of the Federation of North Texas Area
Universities

 

Texas Woman's University - Denton, Texas

Where: ACT Bldg. 2nd Floor

When: February 24, 2006

 

We are seeking proposals for papers addressing the scholarship and life of
John Milton, specifically his epic poem, Paradise Lost and its applications
to today's world. In what ways is Paradise Lost beneficial to today's
scholar? What current issues can benefit from the study of PL or Milton? How
could Milton's work be taught to the modern student? Issues could include:

CFP: Milton (3/1/06; RMMLA, 10/12/06-10/14/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, December 13, 2005 - 1:39pm
Dr. Clay Daniel

CFP: Milton (3/1/06; RMMLA, 10/12/06-10/14/06)

Milton, a special session at the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain
Modern Language Association, October 12-14, 2006, Tuscon, AZ. Papers on any
aspect of Milton are welcome.

You do not have to be a member of RMMLA to propose a paper, but you must
become a member by April 1, 2006 to be listed in the program.

Email one-page proposals by March 1, 2006 to daniel_at_panam.edu

CFP: Spanish Golden Age and the Small College (3/15/06; MLA '06)

updated: 
Friday, December 9, 2005 - 8:21pm
Michael Joy

I invite submissions for a panel I am proposing for the 2006 MLA
conference in Philadelphia. The topic is "The Spanish Golden Age and
the Small College." The panel will center on life as the Golden Age
specialist (broadly defined to include both medievalists and
Renaissance specialists) at a smaller college or university: attracting
students, curricular and extracurricular innovations, connections
between research and teaching, and other topics of interest to the
Golden Age community. 250-word abstracts are due by March 15, 2006 to
the following address: Michael W. Joy, Department of Modern Foreign
Languages, Presbyterian College, Clinton, SC 29325. E-mail address
for submissions: mjoy_at_presby.edu.

CFP: English Seventeenth-Century Lyric Poetry (3/1/06; RMMLA, 10/12/06-10/14/06)

updated: 
Friday, December 9, 2005 - 8:19pm
Eileen Abrahams

I am soliciting proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of English
Seventeenth-Century lyric poetry for a session at the Rocky Mountain Modern
Language Association (RMMLA).

The annual meetings of the RMMLA will take place from October 12 until
October 14, 2006 in Tucson, Arizona.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words either as WORD or RTF
attachments via e-mail or via regular mail. All submissions must be
received by midnight on March 1, 2006. I'll e-mail notification of
acceptance by March 15, 2006.

Please send proposals to Eileen Abrahams at ei_at_vownet.net
or to

CFP: Shakespeare Envisioned (1/20/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Friday, December 9, 2005 - 8:18pm
Helen Whall

Special edition of Interfaces:a Journal of Word and Image, guest editor =
Helen Whall. Call for essays on Shakespeare as envisioning/envisioned, =
e.g., Shakespeare referencing the visual arts; important visualizations =
on screen or stage, historical or contemporary; book illustrations; =
artists' responses to the texts etc. English and French submissions =
welcome. Send inquiries to hwhall_at_holycross.edu. Essays due 1/20/06 may =
be 8,000-13,000 words; images desired, including 15 second video clips =
(CD published with volume).

CFP: Permeability and Rivalry in the Early Modern Arts (grad) (1/5/06; McGill, 3/11/06-3/12/06)

updated: 
Friday, December 9, 2005 - 8:18pm
Meredith J. Donaldson

Panel Proposal for:

=93Permeability and Selfhood=94=20
McGill University, Montreal=20
12th Annual Graduate Conference on Language and Literature=20

=20

Painting about Poetry, Singing about Sculpture:=20

Permeability and Rivalry in the Early Modern Arts

=93If you assert that painting is dumb poetry, then the painter may call =
poetry blind painting=85

Music is not to be regarded as other than the sister of painting=85

The poet remains far behind the painter with respect to the =
representation of corporeal things, and with respect to invisible =
things, he remains behind the musician.=94

(Leonardo, On Painting)

=20

CFP: Permeability and Rivalry in the Early Modern Arts (grad) (1/5/06; McGill, 3/11/06-3/12/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 9:27pm
Meredith J. Donaldson

Panel Proposal for:

=93Permeability and Selfhood=94=20
McGill University, Montreal=20
12th Annual Graduate Conference on Language and Literature=20

=20

Painting about Poetry, Singing about Sculpture:=20

Permeability and Rivalry in the Early Modern Arts

=93If you assert that painting is dumb poetry, then the painter may call =
poetry blind painting=85

Music is not to be regarded as other than the sister of painting=85

The poet remains far behind the painter with respect to the =
representation of corporeal things, and with respect to invisible =
things, he remains behind the musician.=94

(Leonardo, On Painting)

=20

CFP: Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature Regular Session, Open Topic (3/15/06; SCMLA, 10/26/06-10/28/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 9:26pm
Caroline E. Kimberly

CFP: Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature Regular Session,
Open Topic, to be held at the South Central MLA 2006, Fort Worth, TX.

Please submit a one-page abstract by March 15th, 2006 to Caroline Kimberly,
Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Literature, Language, and Culture,
Atlanta, GA 30332-0165, caroline.kimberly_at_lcc.gatech.edu. Email submissions
preferred.

CFP: Court Culture 1642-1660 (UK) (2/28/06; 6/29/06-6/30/06)

updated: 
Sunday, November 27, 2005 - 9:44pm
Jerome de Groot

The University of Manchester invites papers for
Court Culture 1642-1660
at
Hampton Court Palace and Kingston University, London, 29-30 June 2006

Keynote speakers:
Karen Britland, Ann Hughes, Julie Sanders, Nigel Smith

In the summer of 1642 Charles I and his governing entourage left Whitehall.
This conference investigates what happened next to one of the most important
institutions of his reign, the court. How did court life change? What did
the movement of the courts mean for government? Indeed, how useful is the
term 'court' after 1642?

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