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Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The Reception of Geoffrey of Monmouth in Medieval and Early Modern Britain, ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:53am
Victoria Shirley, Cardiff University

Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'Historia regum Britanniae' was one of the most popular versions of insular 'British' history in the medieval and early modern Britain. Over 200 extant manuscripts of the 'Historia' survive today (Crick, 1989), and there were also a number of re-writings of Geoffrey's text in a variety of languages, including Latin, Anglo-Norman, Middle Welsh, Middle English, and Old Scots.

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

"Catch if you can your country's moment": The Poetry of Current Events, NeMLA, Mar. 17-20, 2016, Hartford. Proposals by Sept. 30

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:04pm
William Waddell

If literature is, as Pound said, "news that stays news," then perhaps poetry is always a matter of current events, but recently, books like Claudia Rankine's Citizen or Brian Turner's Here, Bullet, to name just two, have taken on contemporary public moments, current events in common parlance, and in the process sparked a different kind of conversation.

[UPDATE] Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation (Nov 19-20, 2015)

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 8:37am
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference


Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference
November 19-20, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Susan Phillips, Northwestern University
Associate Professor of English and Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professor

Faculty Roundtable:
-Prof. Natasha Barnes, University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor of African American Studies and English

-Prof. Peter Coviello, University of Illinois at Chicago
Professor of English

-Prof. Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of English

-Prof. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University
Frances Willard Professor of Screen Cultures

The Gender-Free Being, Kalamazoo ICMS 12-15 May 2016 SMFS Sponsored Session

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 6:20am
Dorothy Kim, Associate Professor of English at Vassar College / Phoebe C. Linton, University of Edinburgh

One of the SMFS sponsored series, this session on 'The Gender-Free Being' invites papers to consider portrayals of characters in medieval history, literature and art of any period or language that explore the extent to which an individual's identity is distinct from their socially gendered, or sexual being.

Rediviva: Reception of Classical Texts

Wednesday, August 5, 2015 - 9:04pm
Classical Association of the Middle West and South (Panel proposal)

This panel proposal for the 2016 annual CAMWS meeting (to be held in Williamsburg, Virginia March 16-19) is seeking papers on a variety of topics involving original research or creative treatment of texts from the following disciplines: religious studies, rhetoric, literature, history, art history, lexicography, translation, and theater. Topics should be composed within or inspired by the classical tradition. Papers treating works composed in Latin or Greek are especially welcome. Individual presentations will last no more than 20 minutes, with time for discussion between papers.

[UPDATE] Panel on Lexicography and the Classics

Wednesday, August 5, 2015 - 4:57pm

CFP: Panel on Lexicography and the Classics
This is a call for papers for the annual CAMWS conference to be held in Williamsburg, VA, March 16th-19th 2016. The panel aims to explore both innovative developments in the field of lexicography and the history of lexicography within the larger field of Classics. Papers on the following topics are particularly welcome:
• Innovation in electronic lexica
• Lexica and word lists of languages and dialects of the Classical period beyond Latin and Greek (e.g., Oscan, Etruscan, etc.)
• Ancient lexicography and lexicographical notes in scholia
• Medieval lexica and their reception
• Lexica of the early modern period

Fairy Tales in Society and Culture

Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 1:56pm

This panel session will feature the manner in which fairy tales reflect and influence values and ideals of their respective society and culture. In The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales, Bruno Bettelheim emphasizes on how the fairy tale that an individual has read or listened to during childhood impacts him/her both consciously and subconsciously throughout life.

Old age and aging in British theatre and drama - An edited collection

Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 10:43am
dr Katarzyna Bronk

In contrast to the ongoing childhood studies, humanistic gerontology is still largely an unexplored research area, despite more and more attention being paid to old age by historians, sociologists and literary scholars. The latter have taken up the subject of aging and the elderly, trying to create something like an all-encompassing literary "meta-narrative old age" (Johnson and Thane, eds., Old age from antiquity to post-modernity, 17). Johnson and Thane suggest that this may be a fallacy and that one should rather focus on more contained historical and socio-cultural research areas when studying the processes and meaning of aging. This way, for instance, one can avoid interpretative mistakes attributed to Georges Minois.