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Feminist Pedagogy: Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association in Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 1:10pm
Kathleen Alves/CUNY

Feminist Pedagogy in the Two-Year College

How do two-year college instructors put feminist theory into pedagogical practice? This roundtable discusses forms of feminist pedagogy in the community college classroom. Participants are invited to share methods and ideas of pedagogy for teaching in women and gender studies and/or feminist approaches to learning and classroom strategies across the disciplines. Papers should aim to address gender and sexuality issues, along with race and class, within and outside the rapidly transforming academic space of the two-year college.

[UPDATE]

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 6:58am
Gabriel Egan / De Montfort University

Online registration is now open for the following conference at:

http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/ESTS

"Users of Scholarly Editions: Editorial Anticipations of
Reading, Studying and Consulting"

The 12th Annual Conference of the European Society for
Textual Scholarship (ESTS) will be held at the Centre
for Textual Studies, De Montfort University, Leicester
England 19-21 November 2015

New Orleans Review: 2016 Shakespeare Issue

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:18pm
Hillary Eklund / New Orleans Review / Loyola University New Orleans

Four centuries after William Shakespeare's death, his name ennobles a variety of cultural institutions, from libraries and endowed chairs to summer camps and rubber duckies. Even as these structures—both lofty and lowly—rise and fall, we bear witness to the greatest power Shakespeare described: that of poetry itself to preserve without rigidity, to endure without sameness, and to inspire without dominance. Beyond the array of institutions that bear his name, what conversations do Shakespeare's eternal lines animate now?

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Shakespeare's Things

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 1:12pm
ACLA, March 17-20, Cambridge, MA

This seminar invites presentations on the liveliness, actual or apparent sentience, and uncanny autonomy of objects in Shakespeare's plays. The surge of new materialisms across disciplines, including thing theory, actor-network theory, speculative realism, and object-oriented ontology, opens up new possibilities for understanding the latent forcefulness of things—from stage props to statues to dead bodies to coastlines—and the social, economic, and ecological assemblages of human and non-human matter that collude in the creation of Shakespeare's theatrical worlds.

Feminist Singularities [UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:31am
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

Co-organizers: Jacquelyn Ardam, UCLA; Ronjaunee Chatterjee, CalArts

2015 marked the 30-year anniversary of the publication of Donna Haraway's "A Cyborg Manifesto," whose radical questioning of the divisions between human and machine, matter and meaning, and gendered and "postgendered" existence continues to animate our social reality. Recent discussions in the field of new materialism, which grapple with questions of embodiment and materiality, have opened up new avenues for theorizing femininity outside of conventional frameworks.

[UPDATE] CFP: What Devils Say, Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:16am
Texas Medieval Association (TEMA): International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan: May 12-15, 2016

Devils are everywhere in medieval literature, disturbing, challenging, and violating conventional spatio-temporal constraints as they move freely between worlds in order to torment the holy, spread disease, and tempt good Christians by making sin seem sweet. They appear as enchanters, tempters, playful tricksters, masked tormentors, terrifying beasts, mankind's lawyerly accusers, and on occasion, as sympathetic figures who happened to be on the losing side of a cosmic war. Although much has been written about how devils are staged, their appearance, and their interaction with those they torment, very little has been written about what devils actually say. How do devils represent themselves and their spaces of punishment?

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