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UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm
UCLA

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference: Shakespearean Transformations, 8-11 September 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:41am
University of Hull

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives

University of Hull, 8-11 September 2016

www.hull.ac.uk/bsa2016

Keynote speakers:

Susan Bassnett (University of Warwick)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Michael Neill (University of Auckland)
Claudia Olk (Free University of Berlin)
Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides)
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)
Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

'Facts and Fictions' - First Workshop of 'The Art of Identification' Network, University of Birmingham, Tuesday 13 October 2015

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 2:36am
The Art of Identification

The Art of Identification network, funded by a networking grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intends to bring together a range of academics and practitioners in order to explore the interconnections between practical techniques of human identification and the artistic representation of personal identity. The methods by which people have proved, or been assigned, their identities have varied over time – from Early Modern insignia to the contemporary strobe light of a retinal scanner – and the term 'identification' can also be taken to mean a number of things, including the determination of individual personhood via paperwork, bodily examination, verbal testimony, and digital recording.

Looking for Public Humanities Pieces on "America"

updated: 
Friday, July 17, 2015 - 8:55pm
'Merica Magazine: for the unlikely patriot......

It is our contention that a magazine like this has needed to exist for a while. There needs to be a home for the complicated patriot, the unlikely patriot.The sociologist Robert Bellah believed that the United States had a civil religion that was to be contrasted with that of other nations. If that's true – and we think it is – then this is a magazine for the agnostics. What can one say? America seems like a pretty good idea – we should try it some time.

To get what we're up to check out our website at mericamagazine.org (that's "Merica," not "America," lest you accidentally go to the other - though excellent - magazine of that name). Check out especially the "About" section and the "Submission" section for a fuller idea of our concept.

Loving and Hating Lydgate - Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 8:04pm
Lydgate Society

In its five hundred years of reception, responses to John Lydgate's poetry have varied between extremes. Early regard for Lydgate appears in such places as Stephen Hawes' Pastime of Pleasure, where the monk is canonized alongside Chaucer and Gower and at greater length than either of the other poets. By contrast, Joseph Ritson describes Lydgate in 1802 as a "voluminous, prosaick, and driveling monk." This comment has formed a flashpoint in Lydgate studies for both those who would dismiss and those who would defend this poet. Renoir, Schirmer, Pearsall, and Patterson provide a wide-ranging sampling of these perspectives.

Lydgate as Formal Innovator - Kalamazoo 2016 sponsored session

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 8:02pm
Lydgate Society

While historicist approaches to Lydgate have played a large role in the poet's now decades-old critical recuperation, all along this recuperation has also been alert to the formal dimensions of his work and to some of the many ways these dimensions represent innovations. Studies by, for example, Maura Nolan and Claire Sponsler have fruitfully combined historical inquiry with explorations of the ramifications of form. With many in the field of literary study seeking, in a variety of ways, to return considerations of form to the center court of the field's endeavors, it is an apt moment to extend, complicate, and/or critique accounts of Lydgate as a formal innovator.

CFP: "A Feel for the Text: Affect Theory and Literary Critical Practice" (Edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 11:57am
Stephen Ahern

Ever since Massumi posited the autonomy of affect and Sedgwick called for us to pay more attention to the felt "texture" of experience, there has been a surge of interest across the humanities and social sciences in how we are affected by and affect our environments. Affect theorists share an interest in the contingencies of being and in a model of becoming, offering an ontology that accounts for the complexities of lived experience and that promises a space for freedom resistant to the prisonhouse of discourse, to normative ideology, to state thinking.

2nd Annual Literature and Social Justice Graduate Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 2:48pm
Lehigh English Department Graduate Program

The Lehigh English Department's second annual Literature and Social Justice Graduate Conference will take place on Lehigh's campus in Bethlehem, PA, on March 4th-5th, 2016. We will be accepting proposals from Master's and Doctoral students on this year's conference theme, public humanities. Public humanities takes literature and social justice out of the confines of the classroom or academic publication by balancing theoretical concepts with practical actions and projects that benefit others in order to expand participation in and appreciation for the humanities.

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