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[UPDATE] Fictional Economies: Inequality and Novel, Essay collection with forward by Rami Shamir, author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 10:44am
Joseph Donica/Bronx Community College, CUNY

Fictional Economies: Inequality and the Novel

Joseph Donica is an Assistant Professor of English at Bronx Community College.

Rami Shamir is the author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE (Grove Press 2011, http://traintopokipse.com/)

Abstracts of 300 words and full CVs due November 1, 2015 to
fictionaleconomies@gmail.com
Full articles due March 1, 2015
Projected publication fall 2016

JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 5:21am
JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

JOSAAC AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON, ASSAM (ISSN 2348-0602) invites article submissions by for its January' 2016 Issue. The journal is a peer-reviewed and published annually and publishes research base articles on various subjects of Arts, Science and Commerce.
1. The contributions should be original and not published earlier or submitted elsewhere for publication simultaneously.
2. The paper should be typed in MS Word in A4 size paper, times new roman font, 12 point font size in the text and all heading should be 14 font size bold with 1.5 line spacing.

Craft Critique Culture: Bridging Divides (April 8-9, 2016: Iowa City, Iowa)

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:47pm
Kate Nesbit / Lydia Maunz-Breese / Heidi Renée Aijala (University of Iowa)

16th Annual Craft Critique Culture Graduate Conference
April 8-9, 2016
Bridging Divides
University of Iowa

CRAFT CRITIQUE CULTURE is an interdisciplinary conference focusing on the intersections of critical and creative approaches to writing both within and beyond the academy. This year's conference will encourage an examination of the "inter" of interdisciplinary—as well as the construction and deconstruction of boundaries between and within academic, public, private, personal, critical, and creative discourses—through an inquiry into bridging divides.

[Update] Chronicles and Grimoires: The Occult as Political Commentary

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 4:37pm
Medieval Assoc. of the Midwest: ICMS Kalamazoo 2016.

Whether seen in signs and portents, or read in grimoires or magic books, the occult in the premodern world is both marveled at and feared. A significant amount of the description of occult and sorcerous activity, however, also functions as political commentary, whether as direct criticism of secular current events or as a voice or conceptual space for the spiritual "other" in medieval society.

[UPDATE] NEMLA 2016 Panel Still Laughing: Ancient Comedy and Its Descendants Due 9/30

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 2:31pm
Claire Sommers (the Graduate Center, CUNY) and Barry Spence (University of Massachusetts)

Aristotle in his Poetics outlines his theory of tragedy and gives readers a framework for assessing and understanding the genre; his treatise providing the equivalent analysis of comedy has sadly been lost, and as a result, it is difficult to find a unified theory of ancient comedy. Perhaps the closest we have is Democritus' statement that "Laughter is a complete conception of the world." Centuries later, Bakhtin would elaborate upon this sentiment by claiming that the carnivalesque comedy allows for dialogue between multiple genres and voices in order to create a world in which societal structures are upended.

Gastronomy, Culture, and the Arts: A Scholarly Exchange of Epic Portions (March 12-13, 2016), University of Toronto Mississauga

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 12:42pm
Gastro Conference, Department of Language Studies

"Foodies consider food to be an art, on a level with painting or drama" (The Official Foodie Handbook, Paul Levy, Ann Barr, 1984).

From the kitchen to the classroom, the preeminence of food has brought gastronomy to the forefront of mainstream culture as well as academic conversation. Devoid of the irony that may have once infused the Handbook statement, food is, and has always been, indeed 'an art, on a level with painting or drama.'

We invite abstracts from all academic disciplines that address the following themes or other related areas:

Devils in the Details: Demonic Horrors, Devilish Afterlives, and Infernal Desires | ACLA | March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, September 5, 2015 - 10:55pm
Heather Mitchell-Buck & Heather Hayton | ACLA

This seminar aims to examine the ways that premodern depictions of devils, demons, dragons, and other infernal creatures live on beyond their original audience and time period. How and why do these creatures continue to inspire our imagination today, and what can they teach us about modern understandings of medieval ontology?

We are interested in a range of topics that consider how depictions of demonic creatures help us to interrogate -- and better theorize -- hybridity, erotic attraction and repulsion, compulsion, and performance of forbidden selves. We welcome submissions from all approaches, periods, and disciplines. For example:

--how does Beowulf's dragon hoard signify a cultural heritage that needs to remain buried?

[UPDATE] Call for submissions: Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2015 - 6:43am
Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics



The editors invite contributions to Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics, an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to pursuing fundamental questions on the forms and functions of the symbolic. Symbolism publishes high-profile research on topics related to the use of figurative language, thought and signification in artistic expression and representation. While maintaining a strong literary focus, the annual also inquires into practices of the symbolic across discourses in media ranging from the cinema and painting to opera, sculpture and other arts.

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