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CFP Extended Deadline

Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 7:09am
Semper - Seminario Permanente di Poesia di Trento

Comunichiamo che il comitato direttivo di SEMPER - Seminario permanente di poesia diretto da Pietro Taravacci e Francesco Zambon ha stabilito di prorogare di dieci giorni la deadline per l'invio di proposte per il convegno Brevitas. Percorsi estetici tra forma breve e frammento nelle letterature occidentali, che si terrà nei giorni 4-6 novembre presso l'Università di Trento.

Un breve testo di presentazione e le linee di indagine proposte possono essere consultate all'indirizzo

Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 12:34pm
Birkbeck, University of London

Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture
30th October 2015
Birkbeck, University of London

"Though it is in the first place a faculty of individual minds, it is clear that attention has also become an acute collective problem of modern life—a cultural problem." -- Matthew B. Crawford, The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction (2015)

The Medieval "Freak Show": Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages (SEMA 2015 - Oct. 22-24, Little Rock)

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 11:03am
mearcstapa -

Session sponsored by mearcstapa
SEMA (Southeast Medieval Association) Conference Oct. 22-24 in Little Rock, Arkansas

The Medieval "Freak Show": Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages

People and creatures perceived as monstrous or wondrous are often put on display for profit or exploitation. At times, this exhibitionism presents itself as "education." What has popularly been called the "freak show" achieved its height via the emergence of working class entertainments that transformed visual cultures in the nineteenth century, as exemplified in P.T. Barnum's circus and its sideshows, but also including innovations such as the stereoscope and the panorama, which prepared the rise of cinema and, later, television.

NeMLA 2016: "Food and Feast in Post-Medieval Outlaw Literature"

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:43am
Alexander L. Kaufman

This session will present new work from scholars in an emerging line of inquiry: post-medieval outlaw narratives and the textual and cultural relevance of feasting and eating. This session purposefully reaches beyond the Middle Ages to demonstrate that outlawry is a global phenomenon, one that is not only present in a variety of literatures, languages, and cultures, but also one that is inherently intertwined with food and feast. While outlawry has its formal origins in the Middle Ages, the outlaw is a figure and trope present in many post-medieval texts: several Renaissance dramas, and especially American, Native American, African American, and Australian outlaw narratives.

New Journal: The Bulletin of International Association for Robin Hood Studies

Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 1:33pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies

The International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS) is pleased to announce the creation of a new, peer-reviewed, open-access journal, The Bulletin of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies. The journal will be published bi-annually beginning in Spring 2016 and will be available on the IARHS' website, Robin Hood Scholars: IARHS on the Web: Scholars are invited to send original research on any aspect of the Robin Hood tradition.

"Remeasuring Lyrical Pain" -- Seminar CFP -- ACLA Annual Meeting, Cambridge, MA, March 17–20, 2016

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 10:30pm
Jessica Tabak / Brown University

In recent scholarship, lyric emerges as a privileged form for expressing, simulating, and circulating pain: its formal flexibility, non-narrative structure, and somatic elements allow lyric to evoke an embodied sensation whose "resistance to language," as Elaine Scarry memorably argues, "is essential to what it is." Yet these characteristics do not adhere neatly to lyric. Not all lyrics are formally free and non-narrative. Furthermore, various literary genres employ the formal invention, non-narrative digressions, and somatic elements most often identified with the lyric form.

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference: Shakespearean Transformations, 8-11 September 2016

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:41am
University of Hull

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives

University of Hull, 8-11 September 2016

Keynote speakers:

Susan Bassnett (University of Warwick)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Michael Neill (University of Auckland)
Claudia Olk (Free University of Berlin)
Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides)
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)
Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

'Facts and Fictions' - First Workshop of 'The Art of Identification' Network, University of Birmingham, Tuesday 13 October 2015

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 2:36am
The Art of Identification

The Art of Identification network, funded by a networking grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intends to bring together a range of academics and practitioners in order to explore the interconnections between practical techniques of human identification and the artistic representation of personal identity. The methods by which people have proved, or been assigned, their identities have varied over time – from Early Modern insignia to the contemporary strobe light of a retinal scanner – and the term 'identification' can also be taken to mean a number of things, including the determination of individual personhood via paperwork, bodily examination, verbal testimony, and digital recording.