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[UPDATE] Public Intellectuals Lecture Series (Fall 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 8:05pm
Carleton University

DEADLINE EXTENDED: August 18

The Public Intellectuals Lecture Series has just wrapped up a successful spring lineup featuring four fantastic, well attended lectures. We are now planning a second series for the fall.

The Public Intellectuals Lecture Series aims to create a bridge between scholars in the Arts and the general public. While the complex ideas these scholars help develop have important, real world applications to the way we understand and interact with each other, they are often couched in jargon and confined to the journals and lecture halls of the academic sphere. This lecture series will offer a venue and format in which scholars can present these ideas to the public in an accessible manner.

[Update] Chronicles and Grimoires: The Occult as Political Commentary

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 6:07pm
ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

Whether seen in signs and portents, or read in grimoires or magic books, the occult in the premodern world is both marveled at and feared. A significant amount of the description of occult and sorcerous activity, however, also functions as political commentary, whether as direct criticism of secular current events or as a voice or conceptual space for the spiritual "other" in medieval society.

19th Annual Conference on the Harlem Renaissance at Paine College - Nov. 4-6, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 11:46am
Dr. Catherine Adams / Humanities Department at Paine College in Augusta, GA

2015 Theme: The Rise of Respectability and Rebelliousness: Gendered Perspectives of the New Negro Women and Men during the Renaissance

The Department of Humanities at Paine College is requesting proposals for the 19th Annual Conference on the Harlem Renaissance to be held on the campus of historic Paine College.

We are seeking presentations that draw from literature, history, philosophy, art, and music, as well as inter- and cross-disciplinary approaches from the social and political sciences, economics, and STEM.

Medievalism in Popular Culture, PCA/ACA, March 21-25, 2016, Seattle: Proposals Due 10/1/15

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 11:28am
PCA/ACA 2016 National Conference

PCA/ACA 2016 National Conference
March 21st - 25th, 2016 – Seattle, Washington

The Medievalism in Popular Culture Area (now the combined areas of Arthurian and Other Medievalism) accepts papers on all topics that explore either popular culture during the Middle Ages or transcribe some aspect of the Middle Ages into the popular culture of later periods. These representations can occur in any genre, including film, television, novels, graphic novels, gaming, advertising, art, etc. For this year's conference, I would like to encourage submissions on some of the following topics:

Shakespeare's Italy (abstract due Sept. 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 10:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel seeks participants interested in exploring the complex and multi-faceted relationship between Shakespeare and Italy. Key areas of focus will be, among other things, the impact of the Italian Renaissance on England; early modern English translations of Italian works; Shakespeare's use of Italian texts for both direct source and indirect inspiration; Italian settings and characters in Shakespeare's plays; the influence of Italian genres, such as tragicomedy, in Shakespeare's drama; early modern English attitudes towards Italy in general and certain Italians (such as Machiavelli) in particular; and later Italian adaptations of Shakespeare, particularly for the opera and for the cinema.

CFP: CCLA Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively 28-30 May, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:09pm
Canadian Comparative Literature Association

CFP: Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively

Knowledge and understandings of shared values are created based on our respect for difference and diversity and our engagement with the communities we live in. A focus on connections between the individual, the local and the global can provoke new ways of thinking.

Labyrinth as Paradigm in Late Medieval and Early Modern Cultures (ACLA 2016)

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 12:26pm
Victor Sierra Matute

The opening session of La métaphore du labyrinthe, an interdisciplinary seminar organized by Roland Barthes during 1978 and 1979, reached two principal conclusions: first, that despite the apparent chaos always linked to its semantics, the notion of 'labyrinth' actually implies "a factor of intentional and systematic construction"; second, that the labyrinthine structures have essentially a hermeneutic function. The wear and tear of the labyrinth as a metaphoric trope drove Barthes to conclude that maybe the labyrinth is but a "pseudo" metaphor, where the letter is richer than the symbol and thus, the labyrinth would engender narratives rather than images.

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The Reception of Geoffrey of Monmouth in Medieval and Early Modern Britain, ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:53am
Victoria Shirley, Cardiff University

Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'Historia regum Britanniae' was one of the most popular versions of insular 'British' history in the medieval and early modern Britain. Over 200 extant manuscripts of the 'Historia' survive today (Crick, 1989), and there were also a number of re-writings of Geoffrey's text in a variety of languages, including Latin, Anglo-Norman, Middle Welsh, Middle English, and Old Scots.

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

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