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albeit Issue 2.1: New York and Los Angeles in the American Imaginary

updated: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 - 10:43am
albeit

The City That Never Sleeps and the City of Angels. Gotham and the Dream Factory. albeit is going bicoastal, and invites scholarly articles, detailed lesson plans, book reviews, creative pieces, and nonfiction essays exploring the place of New York City and Los Angeles in American culture. Topics for this issue can include, but are not limited to:

[UPDATE] Saint The Value of C.S. Lewis' Scholarship Half a Century after The Discarded Image, CFP Deadline: 29 December 2014

updated: 
Tuesday, December 23, 2014 - 6:45pm
Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Saint Louis University

Session for the 2015 Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Saint Louis University, June 15-17: It has been about half a century since C.S. Lewis' The Discarded Image was published (1964), and the time seems ripe to look into its legacy, past and ongoing, as well as the legacy of Lewis' literary scholarship at large. With the constantly shifting critical landscape in medieval studies, especially the recent rise in new critical perspectives (e.g. disability studies, theories of the monstrous, etc.), a past work of medieval scholarship such as Lewis' can seem like a product of its own time more than a seminal advance in medieval studies.

[Update] Submission Date Extended To January 2, 2015: TRANS-AM :: Losing/Becoming Self (February 12-13, 2015)

updated: 
Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 2:47pm
Louisiana State University English Graduate Student Association

Individuals from around the globe travel to Louisiana early in the year to participate in Mardi Gras celebrations. Masks, costumes and reverie encourage participants to shed certain prefigured aspects of identity in order to become something new. Much of the excitement these traditions allow is rooted in the idea that one can undergo a personal, transformative experience by relinquishing a prefigured sense of self.

[UPDATE] Keynote Announcement for IU English - "Breaking Futures"

updated: 
Saturday, December 20, 2014 - 1:20pm
Hosted by the Graduate Students of the IU Department of English

We are very excited to announce our 2015 keynote speaker, Dr. Jonathan Hsy of The George Washington University!

Call For Proposals: "Breaking Futures: Imaginative (Re)visions of Time"
We are issuing a Call for Proposals for scholarly and creative submissions for an international, interdisciplinary graduate student conference entitled "Breaking Futures: Imaginative (Re)visions of Time," to be held at Indiana University, Bloomington on March 26-28, 2015. Join us for the 13th annual conference hosted by the graduate students of the IU Department of English.

[UPDATE] Mentoring for Scholarly Publication at MLA Vancouver, 9–10 January 2015

updated: 
Friday, December 19, 2014 - 11:32am
The Council of Editors of Learned Journals

This is an invaluable opportunity for MLA members—especially advanced doctoral candidates and junior faculty—to develop their work for publication by meeting with editors from some of the top journals in the discipline, including PMLA, Canadian Literature, Comparative Literature Studies, Modernism/Modernity, MELUS, and Narrative among others.

[UPDATE] "Voyages" Conference - Spring 2015

updated: 
Friday, December 19, 2014 - 6:44am
Associated Graduate Students of English, CSUN

voy•age
/'voi-ij/
noun:
1. a long journey involving travel by sea or in space.
Synonyms: trip, expedition, excursion, tour

There is no mistaking the physical exploration entailed in this simple definition of a voyage, and yet the word's Latin origin, viaticum, or "provisions for a journey," calls to mind far more than embarkment alone. The origin of the word itself invites us to consider the predicate needs at our own or others' starting point(s): How will we prepare ourselves? What will allow us, inspire us, or force us to leave our present situation in pursuit of something beyond our realm of experience?

Exploring Freedom

updated: 
Friday, December 19, 2014 - 1:36am
The Arachneed Journal

The Arachneed Journal invites scholarly papers, commentaries, book reviews, interviews, multimedia presentation (audio visual) for its upcoming issue.
This issue focuses on "Freedom" as the broad theme. Thus contributions are invited from scholars, activists, professionals engaged in diverse streams of humanities and social sciences and allied arts.
We strongly encourage young and emerging scholars to submit their manuscripts for review, focusing on the above mentioned theme or an allied area.

Consequences of "the Fall": Growth and Decline in Medieval and Early Modern Literary Culture; April 10-11, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, December 18, 2014 - 1:41pm
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -- English Department

Consequences of "the Fall": Growth and Decline in Medieval and Early Modern Literary Culture

Very few aspects of late medieval and early modern literature and culture remain untouched by the Fall, concepts of original sin, and considerations of man's place in a postlapsarian world. Concerns over the state of the soul, right governance and maintenance of the commonweal, and engagement with the natural world were shaded by a need to recoup the loss incurred by the expulsion from Eden.

Fallen Animals: an interdisciplinary perspective 19th-20th March 2015, University of Aberdeen, Scotland

updated: 
Thursday, December 18, 2014 - 11:31am
Zohar Hadromi-Allouche and Aina Larkin, University of Aberdeen

Following the success of the Fall Narratives project in 2014, this workshop will explore the theme of fallen animals. The serpent in the Garden of Eden is but one example of the ambivalence which has characterized the human-animal relationship over the centuries, both across, and within, cultures, societies and traditions. With publications such as Anat Pick's Creaturely Poetics (2011), the field of post-anthropocentrism studies has in recent years become particularly vibrant and attracts scholarly attention from a variety of disciplines. We welcome proposals with research interest in fields such as, but not limited to, literature, religion, languages, history, philosophy, psychology, art, film and visual culture, cultural studies and economics.

Subjectivity in an Object World

updated: 
Wednesday, December 17, 2014 - 10:07am
St. John’s University Humanities Review (Vol. Thirteen, Issue 1/Spring 2015)

Publication: St. John's University Humanities Review (Vol. Thirteen, Issue 1/Spring 2015)

"The chief defect of humanism is that it concerns human beings. Between humanism and something else, it might be possible to create an acceptable fiction."
-Wallace Stevens

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