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[UPDATE] NEMLA 2016 Panel Still Laughing: Ancient Comedy and Its Descendants DUE 9/30

Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 4:27pm
Claire Sommers (the Graduate Center, CUNY) and Barry Spence (University of Massachusetts)

Aristotle in his Poetics outlines his theory of tragedy and gives readers a framework for assessing and understanding the genre; his treatise providing the equivalent analysis of comedy has sadly been lost, and as a result, it is difficult to find a unified theory of ancient comedy. Perhaps the closest we have is Democritus' statement that "Laughter is a complete conception of the world." Centuries later, Bakhtin would elaborate upon this sentiment by claiming that the carnivalesque comedy allows for dialogue between multiple genres and voices in order to create a world in which societal structures are upended.

1616 Symposium (Rhodes College, April 21-22, 2016)

Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 11:28am
Shakespeare at Rhodes

2016 marks the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death. Rhodes College, through the bequest of Dr. Iris Annette Pearce, celebrates Shakespeare's quatercentenary anniversary with a free public symposium on the year 1616 on April 21-22, 2016:

Dramatising death and dying in British theatre

Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 7:15pm
dr Katarzyna Bronk

Medieval drama taught its audiences not only about virtuous living but, more importantly, a good death and a joyful afterlife. Miracle plays re-played the most significant and most spectacular deaths known from the Gospels, while morality plays, such as Everyman, imagined the act of dying and the prospects for posthumous happiness of their main characters.

KiSSiT: SHAKESPEARE AND THE STATE OF EXCEPTION, Kingston-upon-Thames, December 19, 2015

Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 6:52pm
Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory (KiSSiT), part of the London Graduate School, is a forum for research by postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers and early career scholars with an interest in Shakespeare, philosophy and theory. The program is committed to thinking through Shakespeare about urgent contemporary issues in dialogue with the work of past and present philosophers—from Aristotle to Žižek.

Following the success of its conference on 'Shakespeare and Waste', Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory seeks participants for a one-day conference on 'Shakespeare and the State of Exception' to be held on Saturday 19 December, 2015 at the Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames.

North American Literature and the Environment. Deadline Oct. 30, 2015

Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 2:53pm
Jim Daems

I am putting together a proposal for a collection of essays for the North American Literature and the Environment, 1600-1900 series for Ashgate. The book will focus on the 16th and 17th centuries, and particularly on how religious views of the period, be they Puritan or Church of England, for example, play a role in how the environment or the colonial enterprise is represented in the work(s) of an author or authors. I am also thinking of such representation in a way that can consider broader categories beyond just theology—gender, sexuality, race, ecocriticism, etc. Topics could include, but are not limited to:
How does a particular religious worldview influence a writer's representation of the North American environment?